categorical


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Related to categorical: categorical imperative, Categorical data, Categorical syllogism

cat·e·gor·i·cal

 (kăt′ĭ-gôr′ĭ-kəl, -gŏr′-) also cat·e·gor·ic (-ĭk)
adj.
1. Being without exception or qualification; absolute: a categorical refusal.
2.
a. Of or relating to a category or categories.
b. According to or using categories: a categorical arrangement of specimens.

cat′e·gor′i·cal·ly adv.
cat′e·gor′i·cal·ness n.

categorical

(ˌkætɪˈɡɒrɪkəl) or

categoric

adj
1. unqualified; positive; unconditional: a categorical statement.
2. relating to or included in a category
3. (Logic) logic another word for categorial
ˌcateˈgorically adv
ˌcateˈgoricalness n

cat•e•gor•i•cal

(ˌkæt ɪˈgɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈgɒr-)

also cat`e•gor′ic,



adj.
1. without exceptions or conditions; absolute: a categorical denial.
2. Logic.
a. (of a proposition) analyzable into a subject and an attribute related by a copula, as in the proposition “All humans are mortal.”
b. (of a syllogism) having categorical propositions as premises.
3. belonging to a category.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin catēgoric(us) (< Greek katēgorikós; see category, -ic) + -al1]
cat`e•gor′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.categorical - relating to or included in a category or categories
2.categorical - not modified or restricted by reservationscategorical - not modified or restricted by reservations; "a categorical denial"; "a flat refusal"
unqualified - not limited or restricted; "an unqualified denial"

categorical

categorical

adjective
Clearly, fully, and sometimes emphatically expressed:
Translations
kategorický

categorical

[ˌkætɪˈgɒrɪkəl] ADJcategórico, terminante; [refusal] → rotundo

categorical

[ˌkætɪˈgɒrɪkəl] adj (= unequivocal) [denial, assurance] → catégorique
to be categorical that → être catégorique sur le fait que

categorical

adj statement, denialkategorisch; he was quite categorical about iter hat das mit Bestimmtheit gesagt; categorical imperativekategorischer Imperativ

categorical

[ˌkætɪˈgɒrɪkl] categoric [ˌkætɪˈgɒrɪk] adjcategorico/a
References in classic literature ?
A direct and categorical negative has something in the appearance of it more harsh, and more apt to irritate, than the mere suggestion of argumentative objections to be approved or disapproved by those to whom they are addressed.
He had been struck again and again by the hang-dog, abominable looks of the ruffians who came to him before the dawn; and putting things together clearly in his private thoughts, he perhaps attributed a meaning too immoral and too categorical to the unguarded counsels of his master.
Of course such a direct question, put in a very categorical way, caused the questioned to blush, if it did not induce her to smile.
Again I was surprised that such a categorical question should come from such a reserved individual.
Neither did Kant when he devised the Categorical Imperative.
Mr Supple is a man of sense, and gives you the best advice; and the whole world, I believe, will concur in his opinion; but I must tell you I expect an immediate answer to my categorical proposals.
Let us go there and have drink while we discuss the unavailability of the categorical.
A related theme is the importance of incremental, rather than categorical, decision making: The crucial question, often ignored in policy debates, is not whether something is good but how much of it is desirable and affordable.
Some researchers argue that list-learning studies illuminate more about the power of categorical memory than about any fundamental flaws in information recall.
Our job carries the same categorical imperative as our CEO's job: Grow the business.
Kant used logic and reason to propose the existence of the categorical imperative, which impels us to "act as if the maxim of our action were to become .
This data feeds into the second chapter, which examines both the rationale behind the trend of converting categorical grants into block grants and how states and localities have responded to this trend.