categorical imperative


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Related to categorical imperative: hypothetical imperative, utilitarianism

categorical imperative

n.
In the philosophical system of Immanuel Kant, the requirement on any moral law that it apply unconditionally and equally to all rational beings.

categorical imperative

n
(Philosophy) (in the ethics of Kant) the unconditional moral principle that one's behaviour should accord with universalizable maxims which respect persons as ends in themselves; the obligation to do one's duty for its own sake and not in pursuit of further ends. Compare hypothetical imperative

categor′ical imper′ative


n.
the rule of Immanuel Kant that one's actions should be capable of serving as the basis of universal law.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.categorical imperative - the moral principle that behavior should be determined by duty
moral principle - the principle that conduct should be moral
References in classic literature ?
Neither did Kant when he devised the Categorical Imperative.
C is inadmissible because it cannot be a categorical imperative.
The role of hypothetical acts, as opposed to actual acts, has been neglected in understanding the nature of what is required by the respect for persons formulation of the categorical imperative in concrete moral relations between persons.
In ethics, Balzac's fiction charts in France a middle course between rationalism and utilitarianism, whereas in Germany and England Kant's categorical imperative exerts influence.
Imagine asking a Kantian to add just a bit of utilitarian calculation to the categorical imperative.
In chapter one, he begins by introducing the basic themes of Kant's ethics, including an overview of the formulations of the categorical imperative and a brief but clear discussion of human freedom (25-32).
The chapters cover the categorical imperative and the moral law, the relationship between reason and the will, and how the "highest good" requires God, the immortality of the soul, and the freedom of the will.
After tracing the GR to the Presocratics, Confucius, Mozi, Aristotle, and Seneca, he fast-forwards to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, particularly Kant's categorical imperative.
They fail the deontological test because they cannot be reconciled either with Kant's categorical imperative or the American Library Association's (ALA) "Code of Ethics" (http://www.
For Demenchonok (Chapter 10) human rights are the categorical imperative of peace, achievable not so much by individual democratic states or a world republic led by a hegemonic superpower, but by a pacific federation of free states in a cosmopolitan order.
How could he stay out of the supreme confrontation when we have Nicolas Sarkozy in front of us and a categorical imperative to beat him?
These universal canons of conceptualization consist of three norms of thought and conduct, which Wiredu named as the principles of non-contradiction, induction and the categorical imperative (Wiredu 1996:22).