catharsis


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ca·thar·sis

 (kə-thär′sĭs)
n. pl. ca·thar·ses (-sēz)
1. Medicine Purgation, especially for the digestive system.
2. A purifying or figurative cleansing of the emotions, especially pity and fear, described by Aristotle as an effect of tragic drama on its audience.
3. A release of emotional tension, as after an overwhelming experience, that restores or refreshes the spirit.
4. Psychology
a. A technique used to relieve tension and anxiety by bringing repressed feelings and fears to consciousness.
b. The therapeutic result of this process; abreaction.

[New Latin, from Greek katharsis, from kathairein, to purge, from katharos, pure.]

catharsis

(kəˈθɑːsɪs)
n, pl -ses
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in Aristotelian literary criticism) the purging or purification of the emotions through the evocation of pity and fear, as in tragedy
2. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal the bringing of repressed ideas or experiences into consciousness, thus relieving tensions. See also abreaction
3. (Medicine) purgation, esp of the bowels
[C19: New Latin, from Greek katharsis, from kathairein to purge, purify]

ca•thar•sis

(kəˈθɑr sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-siz)
1. the purging of the emotions or relieving of emotional tensions, esp. through a work of art, as of tragedy or music.
2. Med. purgation.
3. Psychiatry. a discharge of repressed or pent-up emotions resulting in the alleviation of symptoms or the elimination of the condition.
[1795–1805; < New Latin < Greek kátharsis a cleansing, derivative of katharós pure]

catharsis

(in the Aristotelian concept of art, especially with reference to tragic drama) the purging of the emotions, traditionally said to be those of pity and fear. See also psychology.
See also: Drama

catharsis

The release of pent-up feelings and repressed emotions after a subject has begun to talk about problems during analysis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catharsis - (psychoanalysis) purging of emotional tensionscatharsis - (psychoanalysis) purging of emotional tensions
purging, purge - an act of removing by cleansing; ridding of sediment or other undesired elements
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
2.catharsis - purging the body by the use of a cathartic to stimulate evacuation of the bowels
purging, purge - an act of removing by cleansing; ridding of sediment or other undesired elements

catharsis

noun release, cleansing, purging, purification, purgation, abreaction Writing acted as a catharsis for all his painful feelings.

catharsis

noun
Medicine. The act or process of discharging bodily wastes or foreign substances:
Translations

catharsis

[kəˈθɑːsɪs] N (catharses (pl)) → catarsis f

catharsis

[kəˈθɑːrsɪs] ncatharsis f

catharsis

n
(Med) → Darmreinigung f, → Darmentleerung f
(Liter, Philos) → Katharsis f, → Läuterung f

ca·thar·sis

n. catarsis.
1. acción purgativa;
2. análisis con el fin terapéutico de liberar al paciente de un estado de ansiedad.

catharsis

n (psych) catarsis f
References in periodicals archive ?
He argues that the speech derives its rhetorical appeal from its enactment of Burke's redemption drama, in which pre-existent guilt is symbolically purified through victimage and mortification; transcendence; and images of change, movement, and dramatic catharsis.
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Published some nineteen year's after the death of Chris, Moving Toward Still point is a work of compassion, inspiration and catharsis which is especially recommended reading for anyone having to deal with the illness, injury, or loss of a loved one.
Structuring, in the context of Viennese Actionism, means first and foremost exposure--nakedness among pigments and edible produce, laden with sex and brutality, with repression challenged to the point where a temporary catharsis is joyfully welcomed: the violent reaction of the public and the intervention by the police and justice system the instant the actions no longer took place in private.
Yet for the Japanese, change and newness has come to be seen as an important catharsis, a means of renewing cultural an social identity.
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Finally, it was only the act of writing that provided him with the catharsis he sought.
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Of particular interest is his discussion of the first Latin translation of Aristotle's Poetics, which was being prepared for the printer in Venice by Giorgio Valla between January 1492 and January 1494: Kruger points out that the structure of Durer's Apocalypse series is specifically "poetic" in a way not recognized before, and sees the Apocalypse as the one part of the Bible most readily adaptable to Aristotelian principles of tragedy and catharsis, and to the modern Italian sense of dramatic istoria as praised by Alberti and practiced by Donatello and Mantegna.
Everyone is in expectation to see whether the moment for catharsis has come.
It delves so deep into the personal costs of both betrayed innocence and calculated revenge that the usual genre catharsis never arrives -- and would feel sinful if it did.