cathedral


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ca·the·dral

 (kə-thē′drəl)
n.
1. The principal church of a bishop's diocese, containing the episcopal throne.
2. A large, important church.
3. Something that resembles a cathedral, as in grandeur or authority.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or containing a bishop's throne: a cathedral church.
2. Relating to or issuing from a chair of office or authority; authoritative.
3. Of, relating to, or resembling a cathedral: tall trees whose branches met to form cathedral arches over the path.

[Short for cathedral church, from Middle English cathedral, of a diocese, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cathedrālis, of a bishop's see, from Latin cathedra, chair; see cathedra.]

cathedral

(kəˈθiːdrəl)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms)
a. the principal church of a diocese, containing the bishop's official throne
b. (as modifier): a cathedral city; cathedral clergy.
[C13: from Late Latin (ecclesia) cathedrālis cathedral (church), from cathedra bishop's throne, from Greek kathedra seat]

ca•the•dral

(kəˈθi drəl)

n.
1. the principal church of a diocese, containing the bishop's throne.
2. (in nonepiscopal denominations) any of various important churches.
adj.
3. pertaining to or containing a bishop's throne.
4. authoritative.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Late Latin cathedrālis (ecclesia) a cathedral (church). See cathedra, -al1]

cathedral

A Christian church which is also the seat of a bishop and hence the center of a diocese.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cathedral - any large and important churchcathedral - any large and important church  
bishop's throne, cathedra - a throne that is the official chair of a bishop
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
minster - any of certain cathedrals and large churches; originally connected to a monastery
2.cathedral - the principal Christian church building of a bishop's diocese
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
Adj.1.cathedral - relating to or containing or issuing from a bishop's office or throne; "a cathedral church"
Translations
كاتِدرائيه، كَنيسَةٌ كَبيرَةٌكَاتِدْرَائِيَّة
katedrála
katedraldomkirke
katedraalituomiokirkko
katedrala
székesegyházdómkatedrális
dómkirkja
大聖堂
대성당
katedra
katedrāle
katedrála
katedralastolnica
katedraldomkyrka
มหาวิหาร
katedralbaş kilise
nhà thờ lớn

cathedral

[kəˈθiːdrəl]
A. Ncatedral f
B. CPD cathedral church Niglesia f catedral
cathedral city Nciudad f episcopal

cathedral

[kəˈθiːdrəl] ncathédrale fcathedral choir nchœur m de cathédralecathedral city n (= city that has a cathedral) → ville f épiscopaleCatherine wheel catherine wheel [ˈkæθərɪnhwiːl] nsoleil m

cathedral

nDom m; (esp in England, France, Spain) → Kathedrale f; cathedral town/cityDomstadt f

cathedral

[kəˈθiːdrl] ncattedrale f, duomo

cathedral

(kəˈθiːdrəl) noun
the principal church of a district under a bishop.

cathedral

كَاتِدْرَائِيَّة katedrála katedral Kathedrale καθεδρικός ναός catedral katedraali cathédrale katedrala cattedrale 大聖堂 대성당 kathedraal katedral katedra catedral собор katedral มหาวิหาร katedral nhà thờ lớn 大教堂
References in classic literature ?
As they came up onto the stone plateau that crowns the hill, Amy waved her hand as if welcoming him to her favorite haunt, and said, pointing here and there, "Do you remember the Cathedral and the Corso, the fishermen dragging their nets in the bay, and the lovely road to Villa Franca, Schubert's Tower, just below, and best of all, that speck far out to sea which they say ils Corsica?
Father Fochel of the Cathedral had attempted to explain it; but he had not done so to her satisfaction.
Her ancient decks were worn and wrinkled, like the pilgrim-worshipped flag-stone in Canterbury Cathedral where Beckett bled.
There was a fireplace big enough to camp in; and its projecting sides and hood, of carved and pillared stonework, had the look of a cathedral door.
Near an old cathedral, under a shed, were three crosses of stone--moldy and damaged things, bearing life-size stone figures.
They tripped along the murky aisles with the rest of the com- pany, visiting the familiar wonders of the cave -- wonders dubbed with rather over- descriptive names, such as "The Draw- ing-Room," "The Cathedral," "Aladdin's Palace," and so on.
I have seen their grave; it formed part of the pavement of a huge churchyard surrounding the grim, soot-black old cathedral of an overgrown manufacturing town in - shire.
The night wore out, and, as he stood upon the bridge listening to the water as it splashed the river-walls of the Island of Paris, where the picturesque confusion of houses and cathedral shone bright in the light of the moon, the day came coldly, looking like a dead face out of the sky.
Opening one of the windows after that, he looked out into the moonlight, and told me that the pavement was a solemnly empty as the pavement of any Cathedral at that same hour.
I withdrew at once with the Morisco into the cloister of the cathedral, and begged him to turn all these pamphlets that related to Don Quixote into the Castilian tongue, without omitting or adding anything to them, offering him whatever payment he pleased.
Peter Hawkins, from under the shadow of your beautiful cathedral at Exeter, which is far from London, buys for me through your good self my place at London.
Docks, hospitals, wharves, a Gothic cathedral, a government house, macadamised streets, give to Hong Kong the appearance of a town in Kent or Surrey transferred by some strange magic to the antipodes.