caught


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Related to caught: caught a cold

caught

 (kôt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of catch.

catch

(kætʃ)

v. caught, catch•ing,
n., adj. v.t.
1. to seize or capture, esp. after pursuit: to catch a thief.
2. to trap or ensnare: to catch fish.
3. to take and hold (something thrown, falling, etc.): to catch the ball.
4. to surprise or detect, as in some action: I caught them cheating.
5. to receive, incur, or contract: to catch a cold.
6. to be in time to get aboard (a train, boat, etc.).
7. to lay hold of; clasp: He caught her in an embrace.
8. to grip, hook, or entangle: The closing door caught my arm.
9. to allow to become gripped, hooked, snagged, or entangled: He caught his coat on a nail.
10. to attract or arrest: to catch our attention.
11. to check or restrain suddenly (often used reflexively).
12. to see or attend: to catch a show.
13. to strike; hit: The blow caught him on the head.
14. to become inspired by or aware of: to catch the spirit.
15. to fasten with or as if with a catch.
16. to deceive: No one was caught by his sugary words.
17. to attract the attention of; charm: caught by his winning smile.
18. to grasp with the intellect; comprehend: I caught the meaning.
19. to hear clearly.
20. to record; capture: The painting caught her expression.
v.i.
21. to become gripped, hooked, or entangled.
22. to take hold: The lock won't catch.
23. to play the position of catcher in baseball.
24. to become lighted; ignite.
25. catch at, to grasp at eagerly; accept readily.
26. catch on,
a. to become popular.
b. to fathom the meaning; understand.
27. catch out, to catch or discover in deceit or an error.
28. catch up,
a. to overtake someone or something moving (often fol. by with or to).
b. to lift up or snatch suddenly.
c. to do enough so that one is no longer behind: to catch up on one's work.
d. to involve or interest intensely (usu. in the passive): caught up in the moment.
n.
29. the act of catching.
30. anything that catches, esp. a device for checking motion, as a latch on a door.
31. any tricky or concealed drawback: There must be a catch somewhere.
32. a slight, momentary break or crack in the voice.
33. something caught, as a quantity of fish.
34. a person or thing worth getting, esp. a person regarded as a desirable matrimonial prospect.
35. a game in which a ball is thrown from one person to another.
36. a fragment: catches of a song.
37. the catching and holding of a batted or thrown ball before it touches the ground.
38. a musical round for male voices with the words in overlapping parts contrived to produce humorous or bawdy effects.
adj. Idioms:
catch it, Informal. to receive a reprimand or punishment.
[1175–1225; Middle English cacchen to chase, capture < Old North French cachier < Vulgar Latin *captiāre, for Latin captāre to grasp at, seek out, try to catch, frequentative of capere to take]
catch′a•ble, adj.
Translations

catch

(kӕtʃ) past tense past participle caught (koːt) verb
1. to stop and hold (something which is moving); to capture. He caught the cricket ball; The cat caught a mouse; Did you catch any fish?; I tried to catch his attention.
2. to be in time for, or get on (a train, bus etc). I'll have to catch the 9.45 (train) to London.
3. to surprise (someone) in the act of. I caught him stealing (my vegetables).
4. to become infected with (a disease or illness). He caught flu.
5. to (cause to) become accidentally attached or held. The child caught her fingers in the car door.
6. to hit. The punch caught him on the chin.
7. to manage to hear. Did you catch what she said?
8. to start burning. I dropped a match on the pile of wood and it caught (fire) immediately.
noun
1. an act of catching. He took a fine catch behind the wicket.
2. a small device for holding (a door etc) in place. The catch on my suitcase is broken.
3. the total amount (of eg fish) caught. the largest catch of mackerel this year.
4. a trick or problem. There's a catch in this question.
ˈcatching adjective
infectious. Is chicken-pox catching?
ˈcatchy adjective
(of a tune) attractive and easily remembered.
ˈcatch-phrase, ˈcatch-word nouns
a phrase or word in popular use for a time.
catch someone's eye
to attract someone's attention. The advertisement caught my eye; I couldn't catch the waiter's eye and so we were last to be served.
catch on
1. to become popular. The fashion caught on.
2. to understand. He's a bit slow to catch on.
catch out
1. to put out (a batsman) at cricket by catching the ball after it has been hit and before it touches the ground.
2. to cause (someone) to fail by means of a trick, a difficult question etc. The last question in the exam caught them all out.
catch up
to come level (with). We caught him up at the corner; Ask the taxi-driver if he can catch up with that lorry; We waited for him to catch up; She had a lot of schoolwork to catch up on after her illness.

caught

pret & pp de catch
References in classic literature ?
It caught in the window, the tower tottered, leaned forward, fell with a crash, and buried the unhappy lovers in the ruins.
Among the sheep was a lamb that had been born out of season, and this David and his grandfather caught and tied so tightly that it looked like a little white ball.
Damon, as he caught sight of Tom and Ned in the flickering light of the smudge fire between the two canvas shelters.
While my grandmother was busy about supper, I settled myself on the wooden bench behind the stove and got acquainted with the cat-- he caught not only rats and mice, but gophers, I was told.
Arobin caught the contagion of excitement which drew him to Edna like a magnet.
One, and she was the more juvenile in her appearance, though both were young, permitted glimpses of her dazzling complexion, fair golden hair, and bright blue eyes, to be caught, as she artlessly suffered the morning air to blow aside the green veil which descended low from her beaver.
But when it came to breaking in, that was a bad time for me; several men came to catch me, and when at last they closed me in at one corner of the field, one caught me by the forelock, another caught me by the nose and held it so tight I could hardly draw my breath; then another took my under jaw in his hard hand and wrenched my mouth open, and so by force they got on the halter and the bar into my mouth; then one dragged me along by the halter, another flogging behind, and this was the first experience I had of men's kindness; it was all force.
So strange and uncharacteristic was Tom's conduct that people noticed it, and turned to look after him when he passed on; and when he glanced back--as he could not help doing, in spite of his best resistance--and caught that puzzled expression in a person's face, it gave him a sick feeling, and he took himself out of view as quickly as he could.
She caught the shaggy little terrier up in her arms and kissed him next.
Suddenly, as the child rolled downward on its mother's knees, all wet with snow, its eyes were caught by a bright glancing light on the white ground, and, with the ready transition of infancy, it was immediately absorbed in watching the bright living thing running towards it, yet never arriving.
I told him, too, where they were, and how one of them had fallen into a stream and lay there on its back drowned, with its forefoot caught in a forked root.
Now when the King's army had gone back and told the King that they couldn't find the Doctor, the King sent them out again and told them they must stay in the jungle till they caught him.