caught


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to caught: caught a cold

caught

 (kôt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of catch.

catch

(kætʃ)

v. caught, catch•ing,
n., adj. v.t.
1. to seize or capture, esp. after pursuit: to catch a thief.
2. to trap or ensnare: to catch fish.
3. to take and hold (something thrown, falling, etc.): to catch the ball.
4. to surprise or detect, as in some action: I caught them cheating.
5. to receive, incur, or contract: to catch a cold.
6. to be in time to get aboard (a train, boat, etc.).
7. to lay hold of; clasp: He caught her in an embrace.
8. to grip, hook, or entangle: The closing door caught my arm.
9. to allow to become gripped, hooked, snagged, or entangled: He caught his coat on a nail.
10. to attract or arrest: to catch our attention.
11. to check or restrain suddenly (often used reflexively).
12. to see or attend: to catch a show.
13. to strike; hit: The blow caught him on the head.
14. to become inspired by or aware of: to catch the spirit.
15. to fasten with or as if with a catch.
16. to deceive: No one was caught by his sugary words.
17. to attract the attention of; charm: caught by his winning smile.
18. to grasp with the intellect; comprehend: I caught the meaning.
19. to hear clearly.
20. to record; capture: The painting caught her expression.
v.i.
21. to become gripped, hooked, or entangled.
22. to take hold: The lock won't catch.
23. to play the position of catcher in baseball.
24. to become lighted; ignite.
25. catch at, to grasp at eagerly; accept readily.
26. catch on,
a. to become popular.
b. to fathom the meaning; understand.
27. catch out, to catch or discover in deceit or an error.
28. catch up,
a. to overtake someone or something moving (often fol. by with or to).
b. to lift up or snatch suddenly.
c. to do enough so that one is no longer behind: to catch up on one's work.
d. to involve or interest intensely (usu. in the passive): caught up in the moment.
n.
29. the act of catching.
30. anything that catches, esp. a device for checking motion, as a latch on a door.
31. any tricky or concealed drawback: There must be a catch somewhere.
32. a slight, momentary break or crack in the voice.
33. something caught, as a quantity of fish.
34. a person or thing worth getting, esp. a person regarded as a desirable matrimonial prospect.
35. a game in which a ball is thrown from one person to another.
36. a fragment: catches of a song.
37. the catching and holding of a batted or thrown ball before it touches the ground.
38. a musical round for male voices with the words in overlapping parts contrived to produce humorous or bawdy effects.
adj. Idioms:
catch it, Informal. to receive a reprimand or punishment.
[1175–1225; Middle English cacchen to chase, capture < Old North French cachier < Vulgar Latin *captiāre, for Latin captāre to grasp at, seek out, try to catch, frequentative of capere to take]
catch′a•ble, adj.
Translations

catch

(kӕtʃ) past tense past participle caught (koːt) verb
1. to stop and hold (something which is moving); to capture. He caught the cricket ball; The cat caught a mouse; Did you catch any fish?; I tried to catch his attention.
2. to be in time for, or get on (a train, bus etc). I'll have to catch the 9.45 (train) to London.
3. to surprise (someone) in the act of. I caught him stealing (my vegetables).
4. to become infected with (a disease or illness). He caught flu.
5. to (cause to) become accidentally attached or held. The child caught her fingers in the car door.
6. to hit. The punch caught him on the chin.
7. to manage to hear. Did you catch what she said?
8. to start burning. I dropped a match on the pile of wood and it caught (fire) immediately.
noun
1. an act of catching. He took a fine catch behind the wicket.
2. a small device for holding (a door etc) in place. The catch on my suitcase is broken.
3. the total amount (of eg fish) caught. the largest catch of mackerel this year.
4. a trick or problem. There's a catch in this question.
ˈcatching adjective
infectious. Is chicken-pox catching?
ˈcatchy adjective
(of a tune) attractive and easily remembered.
ˈcatch-phrase, ˈcatch-word nouns
a phrase or word in popular use for a time.
catch someone's eye
to attract someone's attention. The advertisement caught my eye; I couldn't catch the waiter's eye and so we were last to be served.
catch on
1. to become popular. The fashion caught on.
2. to understand. He's a bit slow to catch on.
catch out
1. to put out (a batsman) at cricket by catching the ball after it has been hit and before it touches the ground.
2. to cause (someone) to fail by means of a trick, a difficult question etc. The last question in the exam caught them all out.
catch up
to come level (with). We caught him up at the corner; Ask the taxi-driver if he can catch up with that lorry; We waited for him to catch up; She had a lot of schoolwork to catch up on after her illness.

caught

pret & pp de catch
References in classic literature ?
Anybody can come in and say, "Oh, I caught fifteen dozen perch yesterday evening;" or "Last Monday I landed a gudgeon, weighing eighteen pounds, and measuring three feet from the tip to the tail.
Sea Catch had just finished his forty-fifth fight one spring when Matkah, his soft, sleek, gentle-eyed wife, came up out of the sea, and he caught her by the scruff of the neck and dumped her down on his reservation, saying gruffly: "Late as usual.
Also, one gruesome vision he caught of his own head, sun-dried and smoke-cured, ornamenting the canoe house of a cannibal village.
Thus Demetrios Contos ran away from us, and we did no more than try our best to overtake him; and, in turn, if our boat proved faster than his, or was sailed better, he would, we knew, make no resistance when we caught up with him.
And, do you know, he sought for it continually, for months and months, and never caught even a glimpse of it.
Pinocchio is caught by a Farmer, who uses him as a watchdog for his chicken coop
1-2) Strangers, a contrary wind has caught you: but even now take me aboard and you shall make your voyage.
A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to be spared his life.
A RAT that was about to emerge from his hole caught a glimpse of a Cat waiting for him, and descending to the colony at the bottom of the hole invited a Friend to join him in a visit to a neighbouring corn-bin.
Now when the King's army had gone back and told the King that they couldn't find the Doctor, the King sent them out again and told them they must stay in the jungle till they caught him.
The aide-de-camp, an adept in his art, grasping his partner firmly round her waist, with confident deliberation started smoothly, gliding first round the edge of the circle, then at the corner of the room he caught Helene's left hand and turned her, the only sound audible, apart from the ever-quickening music, being the rhythmic click of the spurs on his rapid, agile feet, while at every third beat his partner's velvet dress spread out and seemed to flash as she whirled round.
The morning dew was still lying on the thick undergrowth of the grass, and that he might not get his feet wet, Sergey Ivanovitch asked his brother to drive him in the trap up to the willow tree from which the carp was caught.