causation

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cau·sa·tion

 (kô-zā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of causing.
2. A cause.
3. Causality.

causation

(kɔːˈzeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or fact of causing; the production of an effect by a cause
2. the relationship of cause and effect
cauˈsational adj

cau•sa•tion

(kɔˈzeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or fact of causing.
2. the relation of cause to effect; causality.
3. anything that produces an effect; cause.
[1640–50; < Medieval Latin]
cau•sa′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causation - the act of causing something to happen
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)
trigger, initiation, induction - an act that sets in motion some course of events
coercion, compulsion - using force to cause something to occur; "though pressed into rugby under compulsion I began to enjoy the game"; "they didn't have to use coercion"
influence - causing something without any direct or apparent effort
inducing, inducement - act of bringing about a desired result; "inducement of sleep"
Translations

causation

[kɔːˈzeɪʃən] Ncausalidad f

causation

nKausalität f; (of particular event)Ursache f; the law of causationdas Kausalgesetz or -prinzip
References in periodicals archive ?
What's troubling to Taylor about some of the Republican proposals on tax policy as it relates to charitable giving is that they draw a causational line between tax cuts and increases in charitable giving simply as a result of tax cuts.
While a causational relationships between depression and anxiety and somatic complaints (even when they are unexplained) has not been established in the literature, the fact that they are correlational is unquestioned (Agiiera, Failde, Cervilla, DtazFernandez, & Mico, 2010; Gerrits et al.
Gates acknowledges there is little research on this topic-the association could be correlational but not causational.
He focuses on the escapades of several people in Kansas who merely used Iowa as a pass-through, thus causing the state to become the setting for history in this book but not intricately involved or causational.
The proposed approach is to reveal the causational factors by focusing on the process of accident development, thus overcoming the main weakness of the traditional accident data based approach that might find correlations between various factors and accident frequency, but not show the causation chains.
In short, what Miller found inspiring in Ibsen is the latter's strict adherence to the dramatic affirmation of clearly verifiable causational relations between past and present actions.
He argued that "we must not use the causational construct as it has often been applied in physical science," and that "causative explanations of crime have tended .
I believe," she writes in one instance, "that in many cases an author's intention to revise is knowable, rational, and explicable, but I am not trying to claim any one textual state as superior in principle to the others; nor do I believe that early and late stages are necessarily connected in a teleological or even causational way" (57).
We assumed that religiosity and class would give way to a causational relationship for support of women's rights.