causation

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Related to causations: causal factor

cau·sa·tion

 (kô-zā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of causing.
2. A cause.
3. Causality.

causation

(kɔːˈzeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or fact of causing; the production of an effect by a cause
2. the relationship of cause and effect
cauˈsational adj

cau•sa•tion

(kɔˈzeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or fact of causing.
2. the relation of cause to effect; causality.
3. anything that produces an effect; cause.
[1640–50; < Medieval Latin]
cau•sa′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causation - the act of causing something to happen
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)
trigger, initiation, induction - an act that sets in motion some course of events
coercion, compulsion - using force to cause something to occur; "though pressed into rugby under compulsion I began to enjoy the game"; "they didn't have to use coercion"
influence - causing something without any direct or apparent effort
inducing, inducement - act of bringing about a desired result; "inducement of sleep"
Translations

causation

[kɔːˈzeɪʃən] Ncausalidad f

causation

nKausalität f; (of particular event)Ursache f; the law of causationdas Kausalgesetz or -prinzip
References in periodicals archive ?
This foundation, together with physician-based clinical data, of course, has since identified many other causations that, when taken together and counteracted, usually bring about complete disease reversal.
He practiced his own advice, as clearly demonstrated in what amounts to a fantastic tour de force in his The Causation of Rheumatoid Disease and Many Human Cancers, a 350-page book that evaluates disparately named diseases and repeatedly demonstrates how they're related systemically--one arbitrarily classified disease grading nicely and continuously into another category.
Yet, it is hardly sufficient just to assert historical causations.