causative


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caus·a·tive

 (kô′zə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Functioning as an agent or cause.
2. Expressing causation. Used of a verb or verbal affix.

caus′a·tive n.
caus′a·tive·ly adv.

causative

(ˈkɔːzətɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar) grammar relating to a form or class of verbs, such as persuade, that express causation
2. (and foll by: of) producing an effect
n
(Grammar) the causative form or class of verbs
ˈcausatively adv
ˈcausativeness n

caus•a•tive

(ˈkɔ zə tɪv)

adj.
1. acting as a cause; producing (often fol. by of): a causative agent.
2. expressing causation, as the verb fell “to cause to fall” or the suffix -en in sharpen “to cause to become sharp.”
n.
3. a word or form expressing causation.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
caus′a•tive•ly, adv.
caus′a•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.causative - producing an effect; "poverty as a causative factor in crime"
noncausal, noncausative - not causative
Translations

causative

[ˈkɔːzətɪv] ADJcausativo

causative

adj factorverursachend; (Gram) → kausativ
n (Gram) → Kausativ nt

causative

[ˈkɔːzətɪv] adjcausativo/a

causative

a. causal, etiológico-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
Learning the structure of causative verbs: a study in the relationship of cognitive, semantic, and syntactic development.
Present-day English let belongs to that small group of causative verbs that take what I shall refer to as the "bare infinitive" as a complement, as illustrated in (1):
The Pajaroello (pa-ha-WAY-lo) tick, Ornithodoros coriaceus, is responsible for transmitting the causative agent (a deltaproteobacterium) when it feeds on a pregnant cow.
Western Blot method to obtain solid (Treponema WB) confirmatory test kits required for testing of the causative agent of syphilis (Treponema pallidum).
Their study reveals similar trends in causative agents over both two decades, which are comparable with trends in other developing nations.
Before that, the Finnish causative derivation is discussed briefly in section 2.
Although the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed, the ranking of causative organisms has not.
Among her perspectives are variation in causatives and applicatives, inchoative-causative alternation in Georgian, causative predicates in the related languages of Mengrelian and Svan, reflexive applicatives, and four-place predicates in low applicative constructions.
De's discovery of cholera toxin was almost three quarters of a century after Robert Koch first cultured Vibrio cholerae (known as comma bacillus at that time) in Calcutta and 105 years after the microscopic observation of the causative agent of cholera by an Italian anatomist Filippo Pacini and the classic epidemiologic studies of John Snow, a British physician describing the waterborne nature of the disease.
However, as clinicians, we would like to comment on epidemiologic studies on cancer, in particular those concerning the possible effects of complex causative factors such as environmental pollution.
Speed is the least important causative factor in most accidents and speed in excess of the speed limit is even less of a causative factor so NWP's statistics of a 53% reduction in serious injuries (taking credit for airbags, NCAP 5* ratings, road improvements, milder winters, tougher driving tests, DSP, DSC and ABS brakes too no doubt) is fishy to say the least.
And for those underwriters who say it is impossible to discover the causative difference, may I suggest that those underwriters re-read Napoleon: "Impossibility is only a word in the dictionary of fools.