cavalier


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Related to cavalier: Cavalier poets

cav·a·lier

 (kăv′ə-lîr′)
n.
1. A gallant or chivalrous man, especially one serving as escort to a woman of high social position; a gentleman.
2. A mounted soldier; a knight.
3. Cavalier A supporter of Charles I of England in his struggles against Parliament. Also called Royalist.
adj.
1. Showing arrogant or offhand disregard; dismissive: a cavalier attitude toward the suffering of others.
2. Carefree and nonchalant; jaunty.
3. Cavalier Of or relating to a group of 17th-century English poets associated with the court of Charles I.

[French, horseman, from Old Italian cavaliere, from Late Latin caballārius, from Latin caballus, horse.]

cav′a·lier′ly adv.

cavalier

(ˌkævəˈlɪə)
adj
showing haughty disregard; offhand
n
1. (Historical Terms) a gallant or courtly gentleman, esp one acting as a lady's escort
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) archaic a horseman, esp one who is armed
[C16: from Italian cavaliere, from Old Provençal cavalier, from Late Latin caballārius rider, from caballus horse, of obscure origin]
ˌcavaˈlierly adv

Cavalier

(ˌkævəˈlɪə)
n
(Historical Terms) a supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War. Compare Roundhead

cav•a•lier

(ˌkæv əˈlɪər, ˈkæv əˌlɪər)

n., adj. n.
1. a horseman, esp. a mounted soldier; knight.
2. one having the spirit or bearing of a knight; a courtly gentleman; gallant.
3. the male escort or dancing partner of a woman.
4. (cap.) an adherent of Charles I of England in his dispute with Parliament.
adj.
5. haughty, disdainful, or supercilious.
6. casual; lighthearted.
7. (cap.) of or pertaining to Cavaliers or Cavalier poets.
[1590–1600; < Middle French: horseman, knight < Italian cavaliere < Old Provençal < Late Latin caballārius, derivative of Latin caball(us) horse]
cav`a•lier′ism, cav`a•lier′ness, n.
cav`a•lier′ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cavalier - a gallant or courtly gentlemancavalier - a gallant or courtly gentleman  
male aristocrat - a man who is an aristocrat
2.Cavalier - a royalist supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War
monarchist, royalist - an advocate of the principles of monarchy
Adj.1.cavalier - given to haughty disregard of others
domineering - tending to domineer

cavalier

adjective offhand, lordly, arrogant, lofty, curt, condescending, haughty, scornful, disdainful, insolent, supercilious He has always had a cavalier attitude towards other people's feelings.
Translations
فارِس
jezdeckavalírrytíř
ridder
reiîmaîur, riddari
raitelisriteris
jātniekskavalērists

cavalier

[ˌkævəˈlɪəʳ]
A. Ncaballero m (archaic) → galán m (Brit) (Hist) partidario del Rey en la Guerra Civil inglesa (1641-49)
B. ADJ (pej) (= offhand) → desdeñoso

cavalier

[ˌkævəˈlɪər]
adj [attitude, behaviour] → cavalier/ère, désinvolte
n (= knight) → cavalier m

cavalier

n (= horseman, knight)Kavalier m; Cavalier (Hist) → Kavalier m
adj
the Cavalier resistance (Hist) → der Widerstand der Kavaliere
(= offhand) person, nature, attitude, approachunbekümmert; disregard, overruling alsoungeniert, kalt lächelnd; … he said in his cavalier fashionsagte er leichthin; treat it seriously, don’t be so cavaliernehmen Sie das ernst, und gehen Sie nicht so leichthin darüber hinweg

cavalier

[ˌkævəˈlɪəʳ]
1. n (knight) → cavaliere m
2. adj (pej) (offhand, person) → brusco/a; (attitude) → non curante

cavalier

(kӕvəˈliə) noun
in former times, a horseman or knight.
References in classic literature ?
Get up, and don't be a goose, Jo," was the cavalier reply to her petition.
The necessity of changing hands at times with their burdens brought a corresponding change of cavalier at the lady's side, although it was observed that the younger Kearney, for the sake of continuing a conversation with Miss Jessie, kept his grasp of the handle nearest the young lady until his hand was nearly cut through, and his arm worn out by exhaustion.
She rewarded her cavalier with a smile, the cheery glow of which was seen reflected on his own face as he reentered the vehicle.
That he might make his appearance before his mistress in the true style of a cavalier, he borrowed a horse from the farmer with whom he was domiciliated, a choleric old Dutchman of the name of Hans Van Ripper, and, thus gallantly mounted, issued forth like a knight- errant in quest of adventures.
In cavalier attendance upon the school of females, you invariably see a male of full grown magnitude, but not old; who, upon any alarm, evinces his gallantry by falling in the rear and covering the flight of his ladies.
When I saw my charmer thus come in accompanied by a cavalier, I seemed to hear a hiss, and the green snake of jealousy, rising on undulating coils from the moonlit balcony, glided within my waistcoat, and ate its way in two minutes to my heart's core.
Cruncher, and finding him of her opinion, Miss Pross resorted to the Good Republican Brutus of Antiquity, attended by her cavalier.
Nor was that wonderful, seeing how cavalier had been the captain's answer.
A cavalier, mounted on a large steed, might be about ninety feet high.
The incomprehensible language and the unpromising looks of our cavalier only increased the ladies' laughter, and that increased his irritation, and matters might have gone farther if at that moment the landlord had not come out, who, being a very fat man, was a very peaceful one.
In short, the ruins, hitherto so cleverly hidden, now showed through the cracks and crevices of that fine edifice, and proved the power of the soul over the body; for the fair and dainty man, the cavalier, the young blood, died when hope deserted him.
The gentleman raised his eyes slowly from the nag to his cavalier, as if he required some time to ascertain whether it could be to him that such strange reproaches were addressed; then, when he could not possibly entertain any doubt of the matter, his eyebrows slightly bent, and with an accent of irony and insolence impossible to be described, he replied to D'Artagnan, "I was not speaking to you, sir.