cave


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cave

 (kāv)
n.
1. A hollow or natural passage under or into the earth, especially one with an opening to the surface.
2. A storage cellar, especially for wine.
v. caved, cav·ing, caves
v.tr.
1. To dig or hollow out.
2. To cause to collapse or fall in. Often used with in: The impact caved in the roof of the car.
v.intr.
1. To fall in; collapse. Often used with in: The walls caved in during the earthquake.
2. To give up all opposition; yield. Often used with in: The school committee caved in to the demands of parents.
3. To explore caves.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cava, from neuter pl. of cavus, hollow; see keuə- in Indo-European roots.]

cave

(keɪv)
n
1. (Physical Geography) an underground hollow with access from the ground surface or from the sea, often found in limestone areas and on rocky coastlines
2. (Historical Terms) history Brit a secession or a group seceding from a political party on some issue. See Adullamite
3. (modifier) living in caves
vb
(tr) to hollow out
[C13: from Old French, from Latin cava, plural of cavum cavity, from cavus hollow]

cave

(ˈkeɪvɪ)
n
guard or lookout (esp in the phrase keep cave)
sentence substitute
watch out!
[from Latin cavē! beware!]

cave

(keɪv)

n., v. caved, cav•ing. n.
1. a hollow in the earth, esp. one opening more or less horizontally into a hill, mountain, etc.
2. a storage cellar, esp. for wine.
v.t.
3. Mining. to cause (overlying rock) to collapse into a stope or sublevel; undermine.
v.i.
4. to collapse (often fol. by in).
5. cave in,
a. to fall in; collapse.
b. to cause to fall in or collapse.
c. to yield; surrender.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Late Latin cava (feminine singular), Latin cava, neuter pl. of cavum hole]

cave

(kāv)
A hollow or natural passage under the earth or in the side of a hill or mountain with an opening to the surface. Caves can form in many ways, but especially from the dissolving of limestone.

Cave

 a small group of politicians who break away from the main party; a splinter party.
Example: cave of Adullam, 1866.

cave


Past participle: caved
Gerund: caving

Imperative
cave
cave
Present
I cave
you cave
he/she/it caves
we cave
you cave
they cave
Preterite
I caved
you caved
he/she/it caved
we caved
you caved
they caved
Present Continuous
I am caving
you are caving
he/she/it is caving
we are caving
you are caving
they are caving
Present Perfect
I have caved
you have caved
he/she/it has caved
we have caved
you have caved
they have caved
Past Continuous
I was caving
you were caving
he/she/it was caving
we were caving
you were caving
they were caving
Past Perfect
I had caved
you had caved
he/she/it had caved
we had caved
you had caved
they had caved
Future
I will cave
you will cave
he/she/it will cave
we will cave
you will cave
they will cave
Future Perfect
I will have caved
you will have caved
he/she/it will have caved
we will have caved
you will have caved
they will have caved
Future Continuous
I will be caving
you will be caving
he/she/it will be caving
we will be caving
you will be caving
they will be caving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been caving
you have been caving
he/she/it has been caving
we have been caving
you have been caving
they have been caving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been caving
you will have been caving
he/she/it will have been caving
we will have been caving
you will have been caving
they will have been caving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been caving
you had been caving
he/she/it had been caving
we had been caving
you had been caving
they had been caving
Conditional
I would cave
you would cave
he/she/it would cave
we would cave
you would cave
they would cave
Past Conditional
I would have caved
you would have caved
he/she/it would have caved
we would have caved
you would have caved
they would have caved

cave

1. A Latin word meaning beware.
2. A hole in the Earth’s crust, produced by water erosion or lava.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the seacave - a geological formation consisting of an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea
cavern - a large cave or a large chamber in a cave
cove - small or narrow cave in the side of a cliff or mountain
floor - the lower inside surface of any hollow structure; "the floor of the pelvis"; "the floor of the cave"
geological formation, formation - (geology) the geological features of the earth
grot, grotto - a small cave (usually with attractive features)
roof - the inner top surface of a covered area or hollow space; "the roof of the cave was very high"; "I could see the roof of the bear's mouth"
stalactite - a cylinder of calcium carbonate hanging from the roof of a limestone cave
stalagmite - a cylinder of calcium carbonate projecting upward from the floor of a limestone cave
wall - a vertical (or almost vertical) smooth rock face (as of a cave or mountain)
Verb1.cave - hollow out as if making a cave or opening; "The river was caving the banks"
core out, hollow out, hollow - remove the interior of; "hollow out a tree trunk"
sap - excavate the earth beneath
2.cave - explore natural caves
explore - travel to or penetrate into; "explore unknown territory in biology"

cave

noun hollow, cavern, grotto, den, cavity creatures such as bats and moths which shelter in caves
Quotations
"Caves: Usually inhabited by thieves. Always full of snakes" [Gustave Flaubert The Dictionary of Received Ideas]

cave

noun
A hollow beneath the earth's surface:
phrasal verb
cave in
1. To fall in:
Idiom: give way.
2. To suddenly lose all health or strength:
Informal: crack up.
Slang: conk out.
Idiom: give way.
Translations
пещера
jeskyně
hule
غار
luolamurtuaporausjätesiipisoppi
pećinaspilja
barlang
gua
hellir
ほら穴
동굴
cavernaspelunca
įkristiurvinis žmogus
ala
cavernăgrotăpeşteră
jamavotlina
grotta
ถ้ำ
hanghang động

cave

1 [keɪv]
A. Ncueva f, caverna f
B. CPD cave dweller Ncavernícola mf, troglodita mf
cave painting Npintura f rupestre
cave in VI + ADV
1. [ceiling] → derrumbarse, desplomarse; [ground] → hundirse
2. (fig) (= submit) → ceder, rendirse

cave

2 (o.f.) [ˈkeɪvɪ] EXCL (Brit) (Scol) cave!¡ojo!, ¡ahí viene!
to keep caveestar a la mira

cave

[ˈkeɪv]
ncaverne f, grotte f
vi
to go caving → faire de la spéléologie, faire de la spéléo
cave in
vi
[roof] → s'effondrer
(= give in) [person] → céder

cave

:
cave dweller
cave-in
nEinsturz m; (= place)Einsturzstelle f
caveman
nHöhlenmensch m; (fig)Tier nt (inf), → Urmensch m; cave instinctsUrinstinkte pl
cave painting

cave

1
n to keep cave (dated Brit Sch sl) → Schmiere stehen (inf)

cave

2
nHöhle f
vi to go cavingauf Höhlenexpedition(en) gehen; he did a lot of caving in his youthin seiner Jugend hat er viel Höhlenforschung betrieben

cave

[keɪv]
1. ngrotta, caverna
2. vi to go cavingfare speleologia
cave in vi + adv (ceiling, roof) → sfondarsi, crollare; (ground) → franare, cedere

cave

(keiv) noun
a large natural hollow in rock or in the earth. The children explored the caves.
ˈcaveman (-mӕn) noun
in prehistoric times, a person who lived in a cave. Cavemen dressed in the skins of animals.
cave in
(of walls etc) to collapse.

cave

كَهْف jeskyně hule Höhle σπηλιά cueva luola grotte pećina grotta ほら穴 동굴 grot hule jaskinia caverna пещера grotta ถ้ำ mağara hang động 洞穴

cave

n. depresión;
caverna.
References in classic literature ?
A gloomy wood," according to the one playbill, was represented by a few shrubs in pots, green baize on the floor, and a cave in the distance.
For several hundred feet there was nothing remarkable about the cave.
If they're nice people, I hate to think of them spending the winter in that cave of Krajiek's,' said grandmother.
Then, holding the brand, he crossed a deep, narrow chasm in the rocks which ran at right angles with the passage they were in, but which, unlike that, was open to the heavens, and entered another cave, answering to the description of the first, in every essential particular.
I wish it didn't look so cussedly like a robber's cave," said George Kearney, when they were taking a quiet preliminary survey of the unclassified treasures, before the Carrs took possession.
She at length withdrew her eyes from the dark countenance of the Colonel's portrait, heaved a sigh, --indeed, her breast was a very cave of Aolus that morning, --and stept across the room on tiptoe, as is the customary gait of elderly women.
As well might those tablets stand in the cave of Elephanta as here.
Let us now with whatever levers and steam-engines we have at hand, cant over the sperm whale's head, so that it may lie bottom up; then, ascending by a ladder to the summit, have a peep down the mouth; and were it not that the body is now completely separated from it, with a lantern we might descend into the great Kentucky Mammoth Cave of his stomach.
The veselija has come down to them from a far-off time; and the meaning of it was that one might dwell within the cave and gaze upon shadows, provided only that once in his lifetime he could break his chains, and feel his wings, and behold the sun; provided that once in his lifetime he might testify to the fact that life, with all its cares and its terrors, is no such great thing after all, but merely a bubble upon the surface of a river, a thing that one may toss about and play with as a juggler tosses his golden balls, a thing that one may quaff, like a goblet of rare red wine.
As a next move, I paid a private visit to that old cave of Merlin's -- not the small one -- the big one --"
Two miles below Hornberg castle is a cave in a low cliff, which the captain of the raft said had once been occupied by a beautiful heiress of Hornberg--the Lady Gertrude-- in the old times.
Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich.