caveman

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cave·man

 (kāv′măn′)
n.
1. A prehistoric or primitive human living in caves.
2. Informal A man who is crude or ill-mannered, especially toward women.

caveman

(ˈkeɪvˌmæn)
n, pl -men
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a man of the Palaeolithic age; cave dweller
2. informal facetious a man who is primitive or brutal in behaviour, etc

caveman

A prehistoric human being who lived in a cave, especially in the Paleolithic Age.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caveman - someone who lives in a cavecaveman - someone who lives in a cave    
primitive, primitive person - a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
Translations
ساكِنُ الكُهوف
jeskynní člověk
hulemand
barlanglakó
steinaldarmaîur, hellisbúi
jaskynný človek
grottmänniska
mağara adamı

caveman

[ˈkeɪvmæn] N (cavemen (pl))
1. (Anthropology) → hombre m de las cavernas, cavernícola m, troglodita m; (more loosely) → hombre m prehistórico
2. (aggressively masculine) → machote m

caveman

[ˈkeɪvmæn] nhomme m des cavernescave painting npeinture f rupestre

caveman

[ˈkeɪvˌmæn] n (-men (pl)) → cavernicolo, uomo delle caverne

cave

(keiv) noun
a large natural hollow in rock or in the earth. The children explored the caves.
ˈcaveman (-mӕn) noun
in prehistoric times, a person who lived in a cave. Cavemen dressed in the skins of animals.
cave in
(of walls etc) to collapse.
References in classic literature ?
If you can come, you will see the cave-man, in evening dress, snarling and snapping over a bone.
He sketched the economic condition of the cave-man and of the savage peoples of to-day, pointing out that they possessed neither tools nor machines, and possessed only a natural efficiency of one in producing power.
One would conclude from this that under a capable management of society modern civilized man would be a great deal better off than the cave-man.
If modern man's producing power is a thousand times greater than that of the cave-man, why then, in the United States to-day, are there fifteen million people who are not properly sheltered and properly fed?
I pointed out that modern man's producing power through social organization and the use of machinery was a thousand times greater than that of the cave-man.