caveat emptor


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Related to caveat emptor: Caveat lector

caveat emp·tor

 (ĕmp′tôr′)
n.
The axiom or principle in commerce that the buyer alone is responsible for assessing the quality of a purchase before buying.

[From Latin caveat ēmptor, let the buyer beware : caveat, third person sing. present subjunctive of cavēre, to beware + ēmptor, buyer.]

caveat emptor

(ˈɛmptɔː)
n
(Law) the principle that the buyer must bear the risk for the quality of goods purchased unless they are covered by the seller's warranty
[Latin: let the buyer beware]

ca′veat emp′tor

(ˈɛmp tɔr)
let the buyer beware: the principle that the seller of a product cannot be held responsible for its quality unless it is guaranteed in a warranty.
[1515–25; < Latin]

caveat emptor

A Latin phrase meaning let the buyer beware, used to mean the idea that a buyer must not assume that the quality of a purchase is guaranteed .
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caveat emptor - a commercial principle that without a warranty the buyer takes upon himself the risk of quality
precept, principle - rule of personal conduct
Translations

caveat emptor

n (Jur) → Ausschluss mder Gewährleistung
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References in periodicals archive ?
While the Company still has the designation of caveat emptor, it is committed to securing the removal of this status.
The phrase caveat emptor - buyer beware - is crucial to remember.
In the absence of stringent consumer protection agencies, the only useful advice for consumers in the region is the principle of "Buyer Beware" or caveat emptor.
When it comes to technology, we, as a society, and as individuals, have failed to heed the age-old admonitions of caveat emptor and moderation in all things.
A In common with much of the business world, one of the guiding principles of the property market has always been the concept of caveat emptor, or "let the buyer beware".
In the commercial world, caveat emptor means that the buyer bears the risk for the quality of goods purchased unless they are covered by the seller's warranty.
Now that the statute of limitations on these crimes has expired, CAVEAT EMPTOR is participant author Ken Perenyi's confession, and basically tells how he pulled it off.
By spelling out the rights and remedies of the consumers in a market so far dominated by organized manufacturers and traders of goods and providers of various types of services, the Act makes the dictum, caveat emptor ('buyer beware') a thing of the past.
Caveat emptor, "let the buyer beware," is a caution that has taken on new relevance in the horticultural press.
Consumer rights were summed up in one Latin phrase, caveat emptor.
The final two means of slave transfer listed in table 1 are commercial auctions involving sales with warranty and those involving caveat emptor.
Because of this, the courts have developed the legal doctrine known as caveat emptor or, translated, let the buyer beware.