cavefish


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cave·fish

 (kāv′fĭsh′)
n. pl. cavefish or cave·fish·es
Any of various North American freshwater fishes of the family Amblyopsidae, found in subterranean waters and having rudimentary nonfunctioning eyes.

cavefish

(ˈkeɪvˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
(Animals) any of various small freshwater cyprinodont fishes of the genera Amblyopsis, Chologaster, etc, living in subterranean and other waters in S North America. See also blindfish
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The Tabin and Lindquist labs devised a complex set of experiments with cavefish and surface fish of the same species.
Despite the toxic conditions, the cave harbors a diverse fauna of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Summers Engel, 2007), including a unique population of cavefish (cave mollies, Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae).
The cave lakes have a genetically blind and albinic cavefish.
That potential change to traffic patterns is somewhere out in the future and dependent on, among other things, the potential impact of stormwater drainage on the habitat of the Ozark Cavefish.
Washington, Jan 23 ( ANI ): Several populations of cavefish have constantly and independently, lost their eyesight and pigmentation, which is a remarkable example of convergent evolution, researchers say.
For example, Reif (1985) investigated the morphogenesis and function of the squamation of sharks, Hill (1971) the appearance of scales and patterns of squamation on an actinopterygian, the spring cavefish (Forbesichthys agassizii (Putnam)), Sire & Akimenko (2004) scale development and squamation pattern in another actinopterygian zebra danio (Danio rerio (Hamilton)).
Cave biologists spotlight the most obvious adaptations by distinguishing among three types of cave animals: Troglobites (or troglobionts) like tiny cavefish dwell in caves and nowhere else; troglophiles may live in caves most of the time or in similar environments outside; trogloxenes spend time inside and outside caves.
Topics include geographic distribution of cavefish, biology of cavefish including cellular mechanisms of eye degeneration, reproduction timing, male mating behavior, migratory neural crest cells, gut contents in relation to prey densities, conservation of subterranean fishes, and genetic diversity of cavefish populations.
It is unknown what specific host life cycle is followed in this cave environment since other potential second intermediate hosts are found within, including southern two-lined salamanders, Eurycea cirrigera, northern green frogs, Lithobates (Rana) clamitans melanota, American bullfrogs, Lithobates (Rana) catesbeianus, and the southern cavefish, Typhlichthys subterraneus.
Last year, researchers raised the possibility that Mexican blind cavefish once could see but traded in their vision for bigger jaws and teeth (SN: 8/23/03, p.
One acute pollution event, even if detected by proposed monitoring stations, could not be stopped from reaching Key Cave, and could lead to the death of Alabama cavefish.
Federally listed threatened or endangered species and species of concern that benefit from the refuge are the endangered Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens), gray bat (Myotis grisescens), and Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis); the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae); and species of concern like the eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii), southeastern bat (Myotis austroriparius), southeastern big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii), longnose darter (Percina nasuta), Ozark cave crayfish (Cambarus aculabrum), Bowman's cave amphipod (Stygobromus bowmani), Ozark cave amphipod (Stygobromus ozarkensis), bat cave isopod (Caecidotea macropoda), and Ozark chinquapin (Castanea pumila var.