cavefish


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cave·fish

 (kāv′fĭsh′)
n. pl. cavefish or cave·fish·es
Any of various North American freshwater fishes of the family Amblyopsidae, found in subterranean waters and having rudimentary nonfunctioning eyes.

cavefish

(ˈkeɪvˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
(Animals) any of various small freshwater cyprinodont fishes of the genera Amblyopsis, Chologaster, etc, living in subterranean and other waters in S North America. See also blindfish
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In March, another group of scientists discovered Cryptotora thamicola, a type of waterfall cavefish, in Thailand.
Geological Survey and Louisiana State University have identified a new genus and species of cavefish from Mexico, the Oaxaca Cave Sleeper, which is the first cave-adapted sleeper goby to be found in the Western Hemisphere.
Borowsky, "The Population Genomics of Repeated Evolution in the Blind Cavefish Astyanax mexicanus," Molecular Biology and Evolution 30, no.
This percentage supports the idea that energy cost-cutting helps explain how cavefish go blind.
The Tabin and Lindquist labs devised a complex set of experiments with cavefish and surface fish of the same species.
Despite the toxic conditions, the cave harbors a diverse fauna of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Summers Engel, 2007), including a unique population of cavefish (cave mollies, Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae).
The cave lakes have a genetically blind and albinic cavefish.
That potential change to traffic patterns is somewhere out in the future and dependent on, among other things, the potential impact of stormwater drainage on the habitat of the Ozark Cavefish.
Washington, Jan 23 ( ANI ): Several populations of cavefish have constantly and independently, lost their eyesight and pigmentation, which is a remarkable example of convergent evolution, researchers say.
For example, Reif (1985) investigated the morphogenesis and function of the squamation of sharks, Hill (1971) the appearance of scales and patterns of squamation on an actinopterygian, the spring cavefish (Forbesichthys agassizii (Putnam)), Sire & Akimenko (2004) scale development and squamation pattern in another actinopterygian zebra danio (Danio rerio (Hamilton)).
Cave biologists spotlight the most obvious adaptations by distinguishing among three types of cave animals: Troglobites (or troglobionts) like tiny cavefish dwell in caves and nowhere else; troglophiles may live in caves most of the time or in similar environments outside; trogloxenes spend time inside and outside caves.