cavelike

cavelike

(ˈkeɪvˌlaɪk)
adj
similar to or resembling a cave
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Staged in a cavelike space, the happening allowed visitors to pick fruit dangled from the ceiling, harvest carbs from bread-stuffed logs, and receive boiled potatoes from a man who repeated "Get 'em.
Cavelike spaces formed in bedrock B as the sugar cubes dissolved.
Another regaled me with tales of long evenings spent solving the world's problems over an endless succession of tender kebabs in one of the legendary restaurant's cavelike private rooms.
Thus it tends to break out of the cavelike perspective of pleonexia, which comes into focus as self-enclosed, dark, narrow, and sad.
The design uses less coveted park space than expected, while introducing a modern aesthetic that evokes Frank Gehry's museum in Bilbao, Spain, in its undulating exterior and Turkish underground city of Cappadocia in its cavelike interior.
The local high school is populated with a weird student body and even stranger teachers in a cavelike labyrinthine building.
But, more adventurous than Glazebrook, she then struck out first to Zelve and then to the underground city at Derinkuyu, where she reported that "the cavelike 'city' demands silence, the silence of wonder and not a little controlled fear.
Yet in the same novel, God communicates with her husband, the unfallen King, through a divine artifice, taking him deep below the earth to a cavelike theater and "showing [him] in a darkness what was happening to the Queen," thereby prompting him toward a secret moral choice regarding her (225).
All the windows are boarded up, so rooms are cavelike.
But the real problem was that my friend Kathe and I got caught up along the way in Yugoslavia, where we discovered coastal Montenegrin villages populated by my long-lost relatives, stunning beaches entirely free of dreaded American tourists, and a cavelike disco that thumped Technotronic's "Pump Up the Jam" into the wee hours.
O'Gorman's own house was a prime example: A cavelike structure built into the volcanic-rock ground, it also bore the influence of Mathias Goeritz's emotional architecture, Ferdinand Cheval's outrageous Palais style, the eccentric phytomorphism of Antoni Gaudi, and a heavy dose of pre-Hispanic iconography.
Nicknamed "the dungeon" by students, the room, at the end of a short hallway, has low lighting and feels cavelike with no windows.