celadon ware


Also found in: Wikipedia.

celadon ware

Pottery originating in China, with a pale gray-green glaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Thailand, celadon ware has long been given as a highly valued token of friendship among noble people.
Earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, and celadon ware, many decorated with inlay, incising, carving and graffito techniques, are excellent points of discussion and departure for ceramics classes.
He is particularly drawn to the work of Min, the most brilliant of the creators of the delicate, gray-green celadon ware the village is known for.
The beads, which are hollow and measure 4 cm long, were found with old ''hatomesen'' coins circulated in Okinawa before it became Japanese territory, as well as celadon ware apparently dating from China's Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), which the kingdom paid tribute to.
Near the potters' workrooms, the ceramic shop offers elegant (and expensive) celadon ware, known for its greenish glaze.
Ru Kiln celadon ware became a major source of inspiration for the young potter who had just stepped into his own world of ceramics.
Daly has continued to present his vases, platters and bowls that echo the Oriental traditions, particularly Song dynasty celadon ware, with smooth surfaces, glazed to perfection and rendered in lime greens, blues and blacks that contrast the gold and silver leafing.
Celadon wares are known in China as dong qing, or 'winter-green' (2).
Representative of Northern and Southern celadon wares, six porcelain, tripod censers (fig.
After Yoo died in 1993, Tani started exhibiting his own Koryo celadon wares, including an exhibition in October, when Tani held an exhibition in Vienna with the help of the Japanese Embassy in Austria.
The jarlet, which is about 2ins high, is an example of Longquan celadon wares, dating back to the late Southern Song or early Yue dynasties, about 1300 AD.
An accurate estimate of the total number of celadon wares produced at the Si Satchanalai kilns must await the results of further archeological investigation, but the discovery of substantial numbers of pieces among the cargoes of shipwrecked vessels in the Gulf of Thailand, the South China Sea and the Java Sea suggests that production was substantial.