celandine


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Related to celandine: Chelidonium majus, greater celandine

cel·an·dine

 (sĕl′ən-dīn′, -dēn′)
n.
1. A perennial Eurasian herb (Chelidonium majus) having deeply divided leaves, showy yellow flowers, and yellow-orange latex. Also called swallowwort.
2. The lesser celandine.

[Middle English celidoine, from Old French, from Medieval Latin celidōnia, from Latin chelīdonia, feminine of chelīdonium, from Greek khelīdonion, from khelīdōn, swallow (from the association by ancient writers of the blossoming of the plant with the return of the swallows in spring); see ghel- in Indo-European roots.]

celandine

(ˈsɛlənˌdaɪn)
n
(Plants) either of two unrelated plants, Chelidonium majus (greater celandine) or Ranunculus ficaria (lesser celandine). See greater celandine, lesser celandine
[C13: earlier celydon, from Latin chelīdonia (the plant), from chelīdonius of the swallow, from Greek khelidōn swallow; the plant's season was believed to parallel the migration of swallows]

cel•an•dine

(ˈsɛl ənˌdaɪn, -ˌdin)

n.
1. an Old World plant, Chelidonium majus, of the poppy family, having yellow flowers.
2. an Old World plant, Ranunculus ficaria, of the buttercup family, having fleshy, heart-shaped leaves and solitary yellow flowers.
[1275–1325; Middle English selandyne, variant of celydon < Latin chelīdonium < Greek chelīdónion, derivative of chelīdṓn swallow]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celandine - North American annual plant with usually yellow or orange flowerscelandine - North American annual plant with usually yellow or orange flowers; grows chiefly on wet rather acid soil
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Impatiens - annual or perennial herbs with stems more or less succulent; cosmopolitan except for South America, Australia, and New Zealand
2.celandine - perennial herb with branched woody stock and bright yellow flowerscelandine - perennial herb with branched woody stock and bright yellow flowers
poppy - annual or biennial or perennial herbs having showy flowers
Chelidonium, genus Chelidonium - one species: greater celandine
Translations

celandine

[ˈseləndaɪn] Ncelidonia f

celandine

n
(= greater celandine)Schöllkraut nt
(= lesser celandine)Scharbockskraut nt

celandine

[ˈsɛlənˌdaɪn] n (Bot) → celidonia
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, there was a wretched fellow, preparing with celandine and beef's blood, his "leg of God," for the next day.
The dandelions carpeted the three lawns,-- they used to be lawns, but have long since blossomed out into meadows filled with every sort of pretty weed,-- and under and among the groups of leafless oaks and beeches were blue hepaticas, white anemones, violets, and celandines in sheets.
Celandines grew on its banks, lords and ladies and primroses in the defended hollows; the wild rose-bushes, still bearing their withered hips, showed also the promise of blossom.
SALENDINE NOOK | |Thieves entered a garden on Celandine Avenue and broke into the garage and shed, making off with machine tools and a chain saw on September 23 at 6.
00pm Venue: Minnowburn car park Discover the first flush of flowers adding colour to Minnowburn with lesser celandine, wood sorrel, bluebells, violets and hopefully the yellow primrose among others.
William Wordsworth's favourite flower wasn't the daffodil - it was the humble lesser celandine, Ranunculus ficaria.
Dandelion, plantain, coltsfoot, stinging nettle, greater celandine and dozens of other plants were used medicinally.
4 Celandine Way, Windy Nook, Gateshead, is available to rent part-furnished through Fraser Lake at pounds 550pcm, tel: 0191 478 3456.
Primroses are right up there, along with monkshood, Peruvian lily, anthurium, arum, asparagus, greater celandine, leylandii, daphne, weeping fig, ivy, hyacinth, iris, lobelia, daffodil and tulip.
White juice from a dandelion stem, or Greater celandine, applied daily will also work.
Other legal, non-prescription remedies that can sicken or kill are aconite, chaparral, colloidal silver, coltsfoot, comfrey, germanium, greater celandine, kava and lobelia.