celebrity


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ce·leb·ri·ty

 (sə-lĕb′rĭ-tē)
n. pl. ce·leb·ri·ties
1. One who is widely known and of great popular interest.
2. Fame or popular renown.

[Middle English celebrite, fame, from Old French, from Latin celebritās, from celeber, celebr-, famous.]

ce·leb′ri·ty·hood′ n.
Synonyms: celebrity, hero, luminary, name, notable, personage
These nouns refer to a widely known person: a social celebrity; the heroes of science; a theatrical luminary; a big name in sports; a notable of the concert stage; a personage in the field of philosophy.

celebrity

(sɪˈlɛbrɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. a famous person: a show-business celebrity.
2. fame or notoriety

ce•leb•ri•ty

(səˈlɛb rɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a famous or well-known person.
2. fame; renown.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin celebritās]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celebrity - a widely known personcelebrity - a widely known person; "he was a baseball celebrity"
immortal - a person (such as an author) of enduring fame; "Shakespeare is one of the immortals"
important person, influential person, personage - a person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events
social lion, lion - a celebrity who is lionized (much sought after)
guiding light, leading light, luminary, notability, notable - a celebrity who is an inspiration to others; "he was host to a large gathering of luminaries"
personality - a person of considerable prominence; "she is a Hollywood personality"
toast - a celebrity who receives much acclaim and attention; "he was the toast of the town"
2.celebrity - the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimedcelebrity - the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimed
honour, laurels, honor - the state of being honored

celebrity

noun
1. personality, name, star, lion, superstar, big name, dignitary, luminary, bigwig (informal), celeb (informal), face (informal), big shot (informal), personage, megastar (informal), V.I.P. At the age of twelve, he was already a celebrity.
personality has-been, nobody, unknown, non-person
2. fame, reputation, honour, glory, popularity, distinction, prestige, prominence, stardom, renown, pre-eminence, repute, éclat, notability She has finally achieved celebrity after 25 years as an actress.
fame obscurity
Quotations
"A celebrity is a person who works hard all his life to become known, then wears dark glasses to avoid being recognized" [Fred Allen Treadmill to Oblivion]
"The celebrity is a person who is known for his well-knownness" [Daniel Boorstin The Image]
"Celebrity: the advantage of being known by those who don't know you" [Chamfort Maximes et pensées]

celebrity

noun
1. A famous person:
Informal: big name.
2. Wide recognition for one's deeds:
Translations
شَخصٌ شَهير ، ذائِعِ الصّيتشُهْرَة
celebritahvězdaznámá osobnost
berømthedkendt personstjerne
julkkis
ידועןסלבסלבריטי
slavna osoba
híres emberhírességsztár
nafntogaîur
有名人
유명 인사
slávna osobnosť
kändis
ผู้มีชื่อเสียง
meşhur kimseünlüünlü kişi
người nổi tiếng

celebrity

[sɪˈlebrɪtɪ] N (= fame, person) → celebridad f

celebrity

[sɪˈlɛbrɪti]
n (= person) → célébrité f
modif [chef, hairdresser] → célèbrecelebrity status n (= prominence) → statut m de célébritécelebrity wedding nmariage m de célébrités

celebrity

nBerühmtheit f; (= person also)berühmte Persönlichkeit

celebrity

[sɪˈlɛbrɪtɪ] ncelebrità f inv

celebrate

(ˈseləbreit) verb
to mark by giving a party etc in honour of (a happy or important event). I'm celebrating (my birthday) today.
ˈcelebrated adjective
famous. a celebrated actress.
ˌceleˈbration noun
birthday celebrations.
ceˈlebrity (-ˈle-) plural ceˈlebrities noun
a well-known person. celebrities from the world of entertainment.

celebrity

شُهْرَة známá osobnost berømthed Prominenter διασημότητα celebridad, famoso julkkis célébrité slavna osoba celebrità 有名人 유명 인사 beroemdheid berømthet sława celebridade знаменитость kändis ผู้มีชื่อเสียง ünlü người nổi tiếng 名人
References in classic literature ?
The two or three men who had tried to take advantage of her in a deal acquired celebrity by their defeat.
But not only did each of these famous whales enjoy great individual celebrity --nay, you may call it an ocean-wide renown; not only was he famous in life and now is immortal in forecastle stories after death, but he was admitted into all the rights, privileges, and distinctions of a name; had as much a name indeed as Cambyses or Caesar.
His chief celebrity rested upon the events of an excursion like this one of mine, which he had once made with a damsel named Maledisant, who was as handy with her tongue as was Sandy, though in a different way, for her tongue churned forth only rail- ings and insult, whereas Sandy's music was of a kindlier sort.
He had a noble new skeleton--the skeleton of the late and only local celebrity, Jimmy Finn, the village drunkard--a grisly piece of property which he had bought of Jimmy Finn himself, at auction, for fifty dollars, under great competition, when Jimmy lay very sick in the tan-yard a fortnight before his death.
After years of successful self-dependence, the penalties of celebrity are beginning to attach to me.
They reminded him of the illustrious operatic queens of his early days, whose celebrity was European during a good third of the eighteenth century.
Among resident artists he enjoyed celebrity of a non- professional sort.
The house of the Duke of Bracciano is one of the most delightful in Rome, the duchess, one of the last heiresses of the Colonnas, does its honors with the most consummate grace, and thus their fetes have a European celebrity.
My friend, since I killed Chatillon, adored of the ladies of Saint Germain, I am too great a celebrity not to fear a prison doubly.
Henri's real welfare makes me desirous of screening her from annoyances of this sort; besides, monsieur, as I have before hinted to you, the sentiment of AMOUR-PROPRE has a somewhat marked preponderance in her character; celebrity has a tendency to foster this sentiment, and in her it should be rather repressed--she rather needs keeping down than bringing forward; and then I think, monsieur--it appears to me that ambition, LITERARY ambition especially, is not a feeling to be cherished in the mind of a woman: would not Mdlle.
The celebrity of the bread-fruit tree, and the conspicuous place it occupies in a Typee bill of fare, induces me to give at some length a general description of the tree, and the various modes in which the fruit is prepared.
The celebrity of the isle did not date from yesterday; its name, or rather its qualification, is traced back to the remotest antiquity.