celestial equator


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Related to celestial equator: celestial poles

celestial equator

n.
A great circle on the celestial sphere in the same plane as the earth's equator. Also called equinoctial, equinoctial circle.

celestial equator

n
(Astronomy) the great circle lying on the celestial sphere, the plane of which is perpendicular to the line joining the north and south celestial poles. Also called: equinoctial or equinoctial circle

celes′tial equa′tor


n.
the great circle of the celestial sphere, lying in the same plane as the earth's equator.
[1870–75]

celestial equator

A great circle on the celestial sphere in the same plane as the Earth's equator.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celestial equator - the great circle on the celestial sphere midway between the celestial poles
great circle - a circular line on the surface of a sphere formed by intersecting it with a plane passing through the center
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
declination The angular distance above (positive) or below (negative) the celestial equator.
Earth's axis is inclined at approximately 23 degrees to the Sun's celestial equator changing the altitude of the Sun during the year.
By the time of dichotomy in late October the planet's declination will be well south of the celestial equator.
In the northern hemisphere, the Sun crosses the celestial equator moving southward.
It is also the one constellation that is viewable all over the world, as it lies on the celestial equator.
So why have the days been outstripping nights, even if the sun hasn't crossed the celestial equator yet?
As the sun crosses the celestial equator, the axis of the Earth points neither toward nor away from the sun, resulting in 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness.
The galaxies lie within a continuous ribbon of sky known as SDSS Stripe 82, lying along the celestial equator and encompassing 275 square degrees.
Using the 6-meter Atacama telescope, astronomers analyzed the temperature of the afterglow in a narrow strip of sky along the celestial equator.
The true equinox moments and the equivalent moments when the Moon, Mars, Venus or Mercury intersect the celestial equator (called here, by analogy, "planetary equinoxes") were determined by nonlinear interpolation of the data tabulated in the annual astronomy tables [4]; the residual error of this interpolation was much within the time resolution of our observations.
Nowrouz occurs when the sun crosses the celestial equator and equalises night and day, which is calculated exactly every year, hence the change in the time at which it is celebrated every year.