celestial globe


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celestial globe

n.
A model of the celestial sphere showing the positions of the stars and other celestial bodies as well as circles of right ascension, declination, the celestial equator, and the ecliptic.

celestial globe

n
(Astronomy) a spherical model of the celestial sphere showing the relative positions of stars, constellations, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celestial globe - a globe that is a spherical model of the heavens
armilla, armillary sphere - a celestial globe consisting of metal hoops; used by early astronomers to determine the positions of stars
globe - a sphere on which a map (especially of the earth) is represented
References in classic literature ?
In an apartment of the great temple of Denderah, some fifty years ago, there was discovered upon the granite ceiling a sculptured and painted planisphere, abounding in centaurs, griffins, and dolphins, similar to the grotesque figures on the celestial globe of the moderns.
Edwin Drood is waiting in Miss Twinkleton's own parlour: a dainty room, with nothing more directly scholastic in it than a terrestrial and a celestial globe.
Highlights include the Waldseemuller replica made by the author, Molyneux's celestial globe whose depiction of the constellation Crux (the Southern Cross) is near the dedication to Elizabeth I, the very rare pocket globe of Moxon who in the 1650s reintroduced globe-making to England, the Coronelli terrestrial globe which carries a note within declaring it was made in Vienna in the mid eighteenth century, and how the rediscovery of Mercator gores in the later nineteenth century led to recognition that around forty sixteenth-century Mercator globes once thought entirely lost are now known to have survived.
A cosmographer and teacher of mathematics in Nurnberg, Schoner (1477-1547) made a celestial globe and a terrestrial globe in 1515, and it is the latter that is under study here by independent cartographer Chet Van Duzer.
The terrestrial globe is decorated with cartouches, descriptive texts, ships, animals and detailed descriptions of the latest discoveries in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, while the celestial globe is adorned with constellations and the zodiac, showing animals and mythological figures with stars picked out in gold.
Among the sculptures are an armillary sphere, used to pinpoint the position of heavenly bodies, and a sextant, used to measure distances between stars and a celestial globe.
The Romans made a celestial globe called the Farnese globe in 25 AD.