celestial pole


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to celestial pole: celestial equator

celestial pole

n.
Either of two diametrically opposite points at which imaginary extensions of the earth's rotational axis intersect the celestial sphere.

celestial pole

n
(Astronomy) either of the two points at which the earth's axis, extended to infinity, would intersect the celestial sphere. Sometimes shortened to: pole

celes′tial pole′


n.
each of the two points in which the extended axis of the earth cuts the celestial sphere and about which the stars seem to revolve.
[1900–05]

celestial pole

Either of the points at which the extensions of the Earth's axis intersect the celestial sphere.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.celestial pole - one of two points of intersection of the Earth's axis and the celestial sphere
celestial point - a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
References in periodicals archive ?
But the Southern Cross served as a good omen to Christian navigators, and it was practical, too: its long shaft points to within a few degrees of the south celestial pole.
Polaris is an averagelooking star which just happens to appear close in the sky to the north celestial pole.
The VLBI data are represented by time series of celestial pole offset for the period 1989-2013.
Pole to celestial pole, through wind like desert sand, an adamantine
The south celestial pole can be found midway along the line joining Crux to Achernar.
3, in which the gnomon is once again pointing to the South Celestial pole, whose shadow is cast onto a plane inclined at 15 [degrees] to the horizon.
Immediately above the celestial pole is the faint constellation of Camelopardalus which, despite being the eighteenth largest by area in the sky, contains no stars brighter than fourth magnitude.
To compensate for your local latitude, your sundial's pointer, or gnomon, that casts the shadow on the hour marks should point towards the celestial pole (the north celestial pole if you're in the Northern Hemisphere, the south celestial pole if you're in the Southern Hemisphere).
This brings you close to Polaris, located just 2/3[degrees] from the north celestial pole.
For those of us living in the middle latitudes of Europe and North America, the lens of choice should be a wide-angle--24-35 millimetres--which will provide enough coverage in the frame to include the celestial pole as well as the horizon with its landform silhouetted against the sky.
If you draw an imaginary line from Achernar to the Southern Cross, then the South Celestial Pole lies at about halfway along this line.
The statement that the North Celestial Pole "lies within 0.