cellarman

cellarman

(ˈsɛləmən)
n, pl -men
a person in charge of a cellar where wine or beer is stored
References in classic literature ?
Yet, on the other hand, I cannot but think it shame that a man should turn God's mercy on and off, as a cellarman doth wine with a spigot.
And its brewery, Fullers, have awarded the pub a Master Cellarman award for brilliant beer keeping each year ever since it could first qualify in 2009.
Goose Island lead cellarman Patrick Reisch was recently in New York for the roll-out of the new Goose Island Four Star Pils.
Brian Jackson, bar cellarman at the Lazenby Social Club takes pride in his beer.
After meeting some of the 40 or so volunteer barman and pot washers, the royal visitors joined cellarman Doug Macpherson behind the bar.
The ale choice is a result of Small World's sponsorship of part of the acreage at Yorkshire Hops, based on the banks of the Humber, near Brough, East Yorkshire, and the enthusiasm of David Woodhead, cellarman at The Woodman Inn, Thunderbridge, and the pub's manager, Chris McHugh, to provide customers with a beer that can claim to be truly grown and brewed in Yorkshire.
And beers can taste different depending on how good the cellarman is.
I am greeted by former Bersham miner Peter Jones, now 64, who works part-time as a barman and cellarman.
1682: Champagne was invented by Dom Perignon, a blind Benedictine cellarman at Hautevilliers Abbey.
In a scene that played out at Bonterra shortly after fermentation of the white wines and after malolactic fermentation for the red wines, a cellarman pumped the pressed fraction for the white wine or the entire pressing of the red past a reverse osmosis filter.