cenote


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ce·no·te

 (sə-nō′tē)
n.
A water-filled limestone sinkhole of the Yucatán.

[American Spanish, from Yucatec ts'onot.]

cenote

(sɪˈnəʊteɪ)
n
1. (Geological Science) (esp in the Yucatán peninsula) a natural well formed by the collapse of an overlying limestone crust: often used as a sacrificial site by the Mayas
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (esp in the Yucatán peninsula) a natural well formed by the collapse of an overlying limestone crust: often used as a sacrificial site by the Mayas
[C19: via Mexican Spanish from Mayan conot]

ce•no•te

(səˈnoʊ ti)

n.
a deep natural well or sinkhole of the Yucatán Peninsula, formed by the collapse of surface limestone.
[1835–45; < Mexican Spanish < Yucatec Mayan]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the heat and humidity will soon wear you out so on the way back you should call in at a cenote.
Hundreds of pieces of copal, many shaped like maize ears or molded like maize kernels and placed among jade beads in offering dishes called "arrays," have been found in the cenote of sacrifice at Chichen Itza.
Beeker and several colleagues traveled to the site by helicopter last week to investigate the area around a cenote, or natural well, that the Indiana archeologist has been studying for several months.
Among other exceptional finds from the Sacred Cenote (sink hole) at Chichen Itza is the gold foil depicting combat in boats (difficult to make out even with Tatiana Proskouriakoff's drawing here) and, also from Chichen Itza, A.
It's a sight to behold, out-doing the old Maya ruins of Coba - another day trip that takes in the caves of Aktunchen and allowed us to swim in a cenote, enticing freshwater sinkholes that reflect a kaleidoscope of colour.
Also check out the Sacred Cenote (limestone sinkhole).
Not far from it is the Cenote Azul, the country's largest cenote (sinkhole), which the locals claim is the biggest in the known Maya world.
3]) of palygorskite had been removed from a mine at the bottom of the cenote in the centre of the town (Arnold & Bohor 1975; 1976), and informants reported that during the last third of the twentieth century, the cenote continued as a source of sak lu'um that was sold widely for medicinal purposes (Arnold 2005).
The excursion is built around the natural attractions of the ejido (communal land) like the lake, cave, cenote (sinkhole) and cliffs, all of which lend themselves to adventure activities.
He and his co-workers believe the cenote pattern formed as the crater rim collapsed over millions of years, causing cracks to develop in the overlying limestone rock.