censor


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cen·sor

 (sĕn′sər)
n.
1. A person authorized to examine books, films, or other material and to remove or suppress what is considered morally, politically, or otherwise objectionable.
2. An official, as in the armed forces, who examines personal mail and official dispatches to remove information considered secret or a risk to security.
3. One that condemns or censures.
4. One of two officials in ancient Rome responsible for taking the public census and supervising public behavior and morals.
5. Psychology The component of the unconscious that is posited by psychoanalytic theory to be responsible for preventing certain thoughts or feelings from reaching the conscious mind.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·sor·ing, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

[Latin cēnsor, Roman censor, from cēnsēre, to assess; see kens- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.

censor

(ˈsɛnsə)
n
1. a person authorized to examine publications, theatrical presentations, films, letters, etc, in order to suppress in whole or part those considered obscene, politically unacceptable, etc
2. any person who controls or suppresses the behaviour of others, usually on moral grounds
3. (Historical Terms) (in republican Rome) either of two senior magistrates elected to keep the list of citizens up to date, control aspects of public finance, and supervise public morals
4. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal the postulated factor responsible for regulating the translation of ideas and desires from the unconscious to the conscious mind. See also superego
vb (tr)
5. to ban or cut portions of (a publication, film, letter, etc)
6. to act as a censor of (behaviour, etc)
[C16: from Latin, from cēnsēre to consider, assess]
ˈcensorable adj
censorial adj

cen•sor

(ˈsɛn sər)

n.
1. an official who examines literature, television programs, etc., for the purpose of suppressing or deleting parts deemed objectionable on moral, political, military, or other grounds.
2. an adverse critic; faultfinder.
3. (in the ancient Roman republic) either of two officials who kept the register or census of the citizens, awarded public contracts, and supervised manners and morals.
v.t.
4. to examine and act upon as a censor.
[1525–35; < Latin cēnsor, derivative of cēns(ēre) to give as one's opinion, recommend, assess]
cen•so′ri•al (-ˈsɔr i əl, -ˈsoʊr-) adj.

censor


Past participle: censored
Gerund: censoring

Imperative
censor
censor
Present
I censor
you censor
he/she/it censors
we censor
you censor
they censor
Preterite
I censored
you censored
he/she/it censored
we censored
you censored
they censored
Present Continuous
I am censoring
you are censoring
he/she/it is censoring
we are censoring
you are censoring
they are censoring
Present Perfect
I have censored
you have censored
he/she/it has censored
we have censored
you have censored
they have censored
Past Continuous
I was censoring
you were censoring
he/she/it was censoring
we were censoring
you were censoring
they were censoring
Past Perfect
I had censored
you had censored
he/she/it had censored
we had censored
you had censored
they had censored
Future
I will censor
you will censor
he/she/it will censor
we will censor
you will censor
they will censor
Future Perfect
I will have censored
you will have censored
he/she/it will have censored
we will have censored
you will have censored
they will have censored
Future Continuous
I will be censoring
you will be censoring
he/she/it will be censoring
we will be censoring
you will be censoring
they will be censoring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been censoring
you have been censoring
he/she/it has been censoring
we have been censoring
you have been censoring
they have been censoring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been censoring
you will have been censoring
he/she/it will have been censoring
we will have been censoring
you will have been censoring
they will have been censoring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been censoring
you had been censoring
he/she/it had been censoring
we had been censoring
you had been censoring
they had been censoring
Conditional
I would censor
you would censor
he/she/it would censor
we would censor
you would censor
they would censor
Past Conditional
I would have censored
you would have censored
he/she/it would have censored
we would have censored
you would have censored
they would have censored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.censor - someone who censures or condemns
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.censor - a person who is authorized to read publications or correspondence or to watch theatrical performances and suppress in whole or in part anything considered obscene or politically unacceptable
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
Verb1.censor - forbid the public distribution of ( a movie or a newspaper)censor - forbid the public distribution of ( a movie or a newspaper)
medium - an intervening substance through which signals can travel as a means for communication
criminalise, illegalise, illegalize, outlaw, criminalize - declare illegal; outlaw; "Marijuana is criminalized in the U.S."
embargo - ban the publication of (documents), as for security or copyright reasons; "embargoed publications"
2.censor - subject to political, religious, or moral censorship; "This magazine is censored by the government"
blue-pencil, delete, edit - cut or eliminate; "she edited the juiciest scenes"
appraise, assess, evaluate, valuate, value, measure - evaluate or estimate the nature, quality, ability, extent, or significance of; "I will have the family jewels appraised by a professional"; "access all the factors when taking a risk"

censor

verb expurgate, cut, blue-pencil, bowdlerize Most TV companies tend to censor bad language in feature films.

censor

verb
1. To examine (material) and remove parts considered harmful or improper for publication or transmission:
2. To keep from being published or transmitted:
Translations
رَقيبُ الأفْلاممُراقِب مطبوعاتيُراقِب
cenzorcenzurovat
censorcensurere
arvostelijamoraalinvartijasensorisensuroidaydinminä
צינזרצנזור
cenzorcenzúráz
ritskoîaritskoîandi
cenzoriuscenzūracenzūruotilabai kritiškas
cenzētcenzors
cenzorcenzurovať
sansür memurusansür subayısansür yapmak/etmek

censor

[ˈsensəʳ]
A. Ncensor(a) m/f
B. VTcensurar

censor

[ˈsɛnsər]
ncenseur m
vt
[+ films, books, internet] → censurer; [+ letter] → censurer
(= edit) [+ news, replies] → censurer
(= cut) [+ picture, scene] → couper; [+ word] → supprimer

censor

nZensor m
vtzensieren; (= remove) chapterherausnehmen

censor

[ˈsɛnsəʳ]
1. ncensore m

censor

(ˈsensə) noun
1. an official who examines films etc and has the power to remove any of the contents which might offend people. Part of his film has been banned by the censor.
2. an official (eg in the army) who examines letters etc and removes information which the authorities do not wish to be made public for political reasons etc.
verb
This film has been censored; The soldiers' letters are censored.
cenˈsorious (-ˈsoː-) adjective
very critical. She is censorious about the behaviour of young people.
ˈcensorship noun
the policy of censoring. Some people disapprove of censorship.
References in classic literature ?
He was, moreover, Censor under the Emperor Su Tsung (A.
Moreover, he had in the audience, a pitiless censor of his deeds and gestures, in the person of our friend Jehan Frollo du Moulin, that little student of yesterday, that "stroller," whom one was sure of encountering all over Paris, anywhere except before the rostrums of the professors.
I made my application to the censor and you know the result.
The censor has no right to touch any letters addressed to them.
virtuous censor, but so charitable withal that he tolerates the
They suppose that when wishes are repressed they are repressed into the 'unconscious,' and that this mysterious censor stands at the trapdoor lying between the conscious and the unconscious.
He is a great teacher, a corrector of morals, a censor of vice, and a commender of virtue.
Then, the Analytical, perusing a scrap of paper lying on the salver, with the air of a literary Censor, adjusts it, takes his time about going to the table with it, and presents it to Mr Eugene Wrayburn.
The other State which I shall take for an example is Pennsylvania; and the other authority, the Council of Censors, which assembled in the years 1783 and 1784.
Then the first thing will be to establish a censorship of the writers of fiction, and let the censors receive any tale of fiction which is good, and reject the bad; and we will desire mothers and nurses to tell their children the authorised ones only.
It is scarcely the province of an author to refute the arguments of his censors and vindicate his own productions; but I may be allowed to make here a few observations with which I would have prefaced the first edition, had I foreseen the necessity of such precautions against the misapprehensions of those who would read it with a prejudiced mind or be content to judge it by a hasty glance.
But from these formidable censors I shall appeal to my seniors.