censorious

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cen·so·ri·ous

 (sĕn-sôr′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Tending to censure; critical.
2. Expressing censure.

[Latin cēnsōrius, of a censor, from cēnsor, Roman censor; see censor.]

cen·so′ri·ous·ly adv.
cen·so′ri·ous·ness n.

censorious

(sɛnˈsɔːrɪəs)
adj
harshly critical; fault-finding
cenˈsoriously adv
cenˈsoriousness n

cen•so•ri•ous

(sɛnˈsɔr i əs, -ˈsoʊr-)

adj.
severely critical; faultfinding; carping.
[1530–40; < Latin cēnsōrius of a censor; see censor, -tory1, -ous]
cen•so′ri•ous•ly, adv.
cen•so′ri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.censorious - harshly critical or expressing censure; "was censorious of petty failings"
critical - marked by a tendency to find and call attention to errors and flaws; "a critical attitude"

censorious

adjective critical, severe, carping, disapproving, scathing, disparaging, judgmental, cavilling, condemnatory, fault-finding, captious He is too judgmental and censorious for my liking.

censorious

adjective
Inclined to judge too severely:
Translations
قاسٍ في نَقْدِهِ
kritickýodsuzující
fordømmendekritisk
bírál ó
gagnrÿninn, dómharîur
eleştirici/tenkitçi

censorious

[senˈsɔːrɪəs] ADJ (frm) → hipercrítico

censorious

[sɛnˈsɔːrɪəs] adj (formal) (= critical) → sévère

censorious

adj remark, glancestrafend; he was very censorious of the new policyer kritisierte die neue Politik scharf

censorious

[ˌsɛnˈsɔːrɪəs] adjcritico/a

censor

(ˈsensə) noun
1. an official who examines films etc and has the power to remove any of the contents which might offend people. Part of his film has been banned by the censor.
2. an official (eg in the army) who examines letters etc and removes information which the authorities do not wish to be made public for political reasons etc.
verb
This film has been censored; The soldiers' letters are censored.
cenˈsorious (-ˈsoː-) adjective
very critical. She is censorious about the behaviour of young people.
ˈcensorship noun
the policy of censoring. Some people disapprove of censorship.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Henry Chadwick writes, "Sanctity could easily merge into separation and censoriousness.
its cause by the same means we judge and we shall in no (way) entertain feelings of censoriousness toward those who may differ from us in opinions as to the prime cause of this disturbance.
senseriousnes B1 | sensoriousnes B2 | censoriousness B3 (c) brings] B1, B2 | bring[begin strikethrough]s[end strikethrough] B3 (d) the] the same B2, B3 (e) excites Mens passions and] Excites Men passions to B2 | excite[begin strikethrough]s[end strikethrough] mens passions and B3 (f) transports] B1, B2 | transport[begin strikethrough]s[end strikethrough] B3 (g) conversation] em.
The course of their conversation is eminently conventional: the rabbis attack Allen for his long-standing lack of serf-restraint; Allen blames the rabbis' censoriousness for driving him away from the religion.
Dr Waiton deals assiduously with the issue, particularly the elitism, faux anti-racism and censoriousness that have much wider implications for society.
And so it is symptomatic of endgame thinking with regard to nineteenth-as well as twentieth-century art that Clark himself, who has done so much to invigorate the study of the period, should betray an air of fatigued censoriousness concerning recent writing about Cezanne.
He nevertheless suffered humiliation and rage at the climate of censoriousness within which he worked.
Yet by the end of the century, a new level of censoriousness had developed, born of a now extraordinarily tight embrace between central authority and local elites.
There is neither pleading here, nor any censoriousness.
as a matter of social comfort, I like much better a little meaningless courtesy, than an excess of that Anglo-Saxon bluntness, which quite as often proceeds from arrogance and censoriousness, as from a love of truth.
The people of Camden were churchgoing," Reid recalls, "but their attitude toward religion might be described as an easy familiarity in contrast to the strict censoriousness of New England.