censure


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cen·sure

 (sĕn′shər)
n.
1. An expression of strong disapproval or harsh criticism.
2. An official rebuke, as by a legislature of one of its members.
tr.v. cen·sured, cen·sur·ing, cen·sures
To express strong disapproval of or criticize severely, especially in an official capacity: "whether the Senate will censure one of its members for conflict of interest" (Washington Post). See Synonyms at criticize.

[Middle English, from Latin cēnsūra, censorship, from cēnsor, Roman censor; see censor.]

cen′sur·a·ble adj.
cen′sur·a·bly adv.
cen′sur·er n.

censure

(ˈsɛnʃə)
n
severe disapproval; harsh criticism
vb
to criticize (someone or something) severely; condemn
[C14: from Latin cēnsūra, from cēnsēre to consider, assess]
ˈcensurer n

cen•sure

(ˈsɛn ʃər)

n., v. -sured, -sur•ing. n.
1. strong or vehement expression of disapproval.
2. an official reprimand, as by a legislative body or one of its members.
v.t.
3. to criticize or reproach in a harsh manner.
v.i.
4. to give censure.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin cēnsūra censor's office, assessment]
cen′sur•a•ble, adj.
cen′sur•er, n.
syn: See abuse. See also reprimand.

censure


Past participle: censured
Gerund: censuring

Imperative
censure
censure
Present
I censure
you censure
he/she/it censures
we censure
you censure
they censure
Preterite
I censured
you censured
he/she/it censured
we censured
you censured
they censured
Present Continuous
I am censuring
you are censuring
he/she/it is censuring
we are censuring
you are censuring
they are censuring
Present Perfect
I have censured
you have censured
he/she/it has censured
we have censured
you have censured
they have censured
Past Continuous
I was censuring
you were censuring
he/she/it was censuring
we were censuring
you were censuring
they were censuring
Past Perfect
I had censured
you had censured
he/she/it had censured
we had censured
you had censured
they had censured
Future
I will censure
you will censure
he/she/it will censure
we will censure
you will censure
they will censure
Future Perfect
I will have censured
you will have censured
he/she/it will have censured
we will have censured
you will have censured
they will have censured
Future Continuous
I will be censuring
you will be censuring
he/she/it will be censuring
we will be censuring
you will be censuring
they will be censuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been censuring
you have been censuring
he/she/it has been censuring
we have been censuring
you have been censuring
they have been censuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been censuring
you will have been censuring
he/she/it will have been censuring
we will have been censuring
you will have been censuring
they will have been censuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been censuring
you had been censuring
he/she/it had been censuring
we had been censuring
you had been censuring
they had been censuring
Conditional
I would censure
you would censure
he/she/it would censure
we would censure
you would censure
they would censure
Past Conditional
I would have censured
you would have censured
he/she/it would have censured
we would have censured
you would have censured
they would have censured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.censure - harsh criticism or disapprovalcensure - harsh criticism or disapproval  
condemnation, disapprobation - an expression of strong disapproval; pronouncing as wrong or morally culpable; "his uncompromising condemnation of racism"
interdict - an ecclesiastical censure by the Roman Catholic Church withdrawing certain sacraments and Christian burial from a person or all persons in a particular district
2.censure - the state of being excommunicatedcensure - the state of being excommunicated  
rejection - the state of being rejected
Verb1.censure - rebuke formally
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"
animadvert - express blame or censure or make a harshly critical remark

censure

verb
1. criticize, blame, abuse, condemn, carpet (informal), flame (informal), denounce, put down, slate (informal, chiefly U.S.), rebuke, reprimand, reproach, scold, berate, castigate, chide, tear into (informal), diss (slang, chiefly U.S.), blast, read the riot act, reprove, upbraid, slap on the wrist, lambast(e), bawl out (informal), excoriate, rap over the knuckles, chew out (U.S. & Canad. informal), tear (someone) off a strip (Brit. informal), give (someone) a rocket (Brit. & N.Z. informal), reprehend I would not presume to censure him for his views.
criticize applaud, compliment, commend, laud (literary)
noun
1. disapproval, criticism, blame, condemnation, rebuke, reprimand, reproach, dressing down (informal), stick (slang), stricture, reproof, sideswipe, castigation, obloquy, remonstrance It is a controversial policy which has attracted international censure.
disapproval approval, encouragement, compliment, commendation

censure

noun
A comment expressing fault:
Informal: pan.
Slang: knock.
verb
1. To find fault with:
Informal: cut up, pan.
Slang: knock.
2. To feel or express strong disapproval of:
Translations
لوْم، نَقْد، تَوْبيخيَلومُ، يَنْتَقِد، يُوَبِّخ
kritikakritizovatobsouzeníodsuzovat
fordømmefordømmelsekritikkritisere
megrómegrovás
ámæla, áteljaámæli, átölur
kritikuotipasmerkimaspasmerktismerkimassmerkti
kritizētnopēlumspelt

censure

[ˈsenʃəʳ]
A. Ncensura f
vote of censurevoto m de censura
B. VTcensurar

censure

[ˈsɛnʃər]
n (= official rebuke) → réprimande f
to escape censure → échapper à la critique motion of censure

censure

vttadeln
nTadel m; vote of censureTadelsantrag m

censure

[ˈsɛnʃəʳ]
1. nbiasimo, censura
2. vtbiasimare, censurare

censure

(ˈsenʃə) verb
to criticize or blame. He was censured for staying away from work.
noun
criticism or blame.
References in classic literature ?
It is--we say it without censure, nor in diminution of the claim which it indefeasibly possesses on beings of another mould--it is always selfish in its essence; and we must give it leave to be so, and heap up our heroic and disinterested love upon it so much the more, without a recompense.
To the former her raillery was probably, as far as it regarded only himself, perfectly indifferent; but to the latter it was at first incomprehensible; and when its object was understood, she hardly knew whether most to laugh at its absurdity, or censure its impertinence, for she considered it as an unfeeling reflection on the colonel's advanced years, and on his forlorn condition as an old bachelor.
Raveloe was not a place where moral censure was severe, but it was thought a weakness in the Squire that he had kept all his sons at home in idleness; and though some licence was to be allowed to young men whose fathers could afford it, people shook their heads at the courses of the second son, Dunstan, commonly called Dunsey Cass, whose taste for swopping and betting might turn out to be a sowing of something worse than wild oats.
On the contrary, I fear I shall incur the censure of presumption in placing the venerable name of Dr Jonas Dryasdust at the head of a publication, which the more grave antiquary will perhaps class with the idle novels and romances of the day.
I made my acknowledgements by prostrating myself at his majesty's feet: but he commanded me to rise; and after many gracious expressions, which, to avoid the censure of vanity, I shall not repeat, he added, "that he hoped I should prove a useful servant, and well deserve all the favours he had already conferred upon me, or might do for the future.
Compared to what he saw in it of censure or rebuke, how shallow Basil's reproaches about Sibyl Vane had been
Responsibility is of two kinds -- to censure and to punishment.
In the first place, a distant prospect of public censure would be a very feeble restraint on power from those excesses to which it might be urged by the force of present motives.
Hence they are in error who censure Euripides just because he follows this principle in his plays, many of which end unhappily.
If my sister, in the security of retirement, with as little opportunity as inclination to do evil, could not avoid censure, we must not rashly condemn those who, living in the world and surrounded with temptations, should be accused of errors which they are known to have the power of committing.
To be governed (as we call it) by one is not safe; for it shows softness, and gives a freedom, to scandal and disreputation; for those, that would not censure or speak ill of a man immediately, will talk more boldly of those that are so great with them, and thereby wound their honor.
Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel-writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding -- joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets on such works, and scarcely ever permitting them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she accidentally take up a novel, is sure to turn over its insipid pages with disgust.