necrosis

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Related to central necrosis: Frank necrosis, necroses, necrotized

ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv

necrosis

n necrosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Histologic examination revealed an intramural lesion composed entirely of spindle and epithelioid histiocytes arranged in a palisaded pattern, with central necrosis (Figure 1) similar to the features of a rheumatoid nodule.
Peripheral enhancement and central necrosis were noted (Figs la, b).
Microscopically, widespread central necrosis was present (figure 4).
Four patients were later found to have central necrosis and clinical deterioration.
By week 12, 30% of the treated tumors showed small areas of central necrosis.
The bulla ruptures and may exude a sort of bloody purulent material, followed by central necrosis, a dark brown or black eschar, and edema out of proportion to the size of the lesion.

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