centripetal force

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centripetal force

centripetal force

n.
The component of force acting on a body in curvilinear motion that is directed toward the center of curvature or axis of rotation. Centripetal force is necessary for an object to move with circular motion.

centripetal force

n
(General Physics) a force that acts inwards on any body that rotates or moves along a curved path and is directed towards the centre of curvature of the path or the axis of rotation. Compare centrifugal force

centrip′etal force′


n.
the force, acting upon a body moving along a curved path, that is directed toward the center of curvature of the path and constrains the body to the path.
[1700–10]
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centripetal force
Centripetal force causes the ball being whirled at the end of a string to move in a circle about the person, and not to fly out and away along the path of inertia.

cen·trip·e·tal force

(sĕn-trĭp′ĭ-tl)
The force that pulls an object moving in a circle toward the center of the circle and causes the object to follow a curving path. Earth's gravity acts as a centripetal force on the moon.
Did You Know? In one popular carnival ride, people stand with their backs against the wall of a cylindrical chamber. The chamber spins rapidly and then the floor drops out, but the riders remain pressed against the wall and don't fall down. Why? Most people would say that the reason people "stick" to the wall is because a centrifugal, or outward, force is pushing them against it. In actuality, there is no outward force, no matter how strongly the people on the ride may think they feel one. In fact, it's just the opposite: the riders are really subject to an inward, or centripetal, force. As the ride spins, it forces the riders to travel in a circle. Objects (including people) in motion tend to travel in a straight line at constant speed unless they're acted on by some external force. To make an object travel along a curved path, you have to keep forcing it toward the "inside" of the curve. The walls of the ride do just that, pushing the riders toward the center; the friction between the riders and the wall holds them up, so they seem to defy gravity.

centripetal force

A force that acts radially inward on an object moving in a circular path.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.centripetal force - the inward force on a body moving in a curved path around another body
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
centrifugal force - the outward force on a body moving in a curved path around another body
Translations
dostředivá síla
centripetalkraft
References in classic literature ?
It is not enough that we should have matter, we must also have a single impulse, one shove to launch the mass and generate the harmony of the centrifugal and centripetal forces.
As the air I breathe is drawn from the great repositories of nature, as the light on my book is yielded by a star a hundred millions of miles distant, as the poise of my body depends on the equilibrium of centrifugal and centripetal forces, so the hours should be instructed by the ages and the ages explained by the hours.
Under the centripetal force, the base of the projectile tended toward the moon; but the centrifugal still prevailed; and it was probable that its rectilineal course would be changed to a curve of some sort, the nature of which they could not at present determine.
What I think of on this point is, when self is the fixed point the centripetal force is balanced with the centrifugal.
Only countries with a stable equilibrium between its centrifugal and centripetal forces stay afloat in comity of nations.
GenePOCs groundbreaking infectious disease MDx system, the revogene, combines a smart design with centripetal forces and cutting-edge micro technologies to deliver simple, rapid, and tailored microbial testing at the point-of-care (POC).
The centripetal forces of the West--the ultra-nationalist Marine Le Pen in France, or the extreme anti-Semitic left in British Labor, or Central European conservative populists--could spell geo-strategic, economic and systemic disaster.
Friedman analyzes the weaknesses of the EU and the sources of conflict throughout Europe, particularly in a situation in which NATO's perceived importance has diminished, and concludes that the centripetal forces of geopolitics are just too strong.
At the same time, however, there were centripetal forces at work creating a larger, if sporadic, Panhellenic cultural identity: the Greek language (despite dialectical variations), the pantheon of Greek deities, the Homeric poems as a common cultural possession, and the great religious festivals with the most famous, of course, being Olympia--for which the Greeks would call a sacred truce in order to send representatives to compete in the musical and athletic contests.
For a variety of reasons this is an era where there are tremendous centripetal forces at work within major nation-states and within the institutions of international order that developed in the post-World War II era.
More fundamentally, the centripetal forces that draw in wealth and talent to drive the London economy are hard to discern and may be harder for civic leaders to accept if they don't centre on their city.
Others will participate indirectly to protect their borders, until they too are drawn in by the centripetal forces of war.