century

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cen·tu·ry

 (sĕn′chə-rē)
n. pl. cen·tu·ries
1.
a. A period of 100 years.
b. Each of the successive periods of 100 years before or since the advent of the Christian era.
2.
a. A unit of the Roman army originally consisting of 100 men.
b. One of the 193 electoral divisions of the Roman people.
3. A group of 100 things.

[Latin centuria, a group of a hundred, from centum, hundred; see dekm̥ in Indo-European roots.]

cen·tu′ri·al adj.
cen′tu·ry·long′ adj.

century

(ˈsɛntʃərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. a period of 100 years
2. one of the successive periods of 100 years dated before or after an epoch or event, esp the birth of Christ
3.
a. a score or grouping of 100: to score a century in cricket.
b. chiefly US (as modifier): the basketball team passed the century mark in their last game.
4. (Military) (in ancient Rome) a unit of foot soldiers, originally 100 strong, later consisting of 60 to 80 men. See also maniple
5. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a unit of foot soldiers, originally 100 strong, later consisting of 60 to 80 men. See also maniple
6. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a division of the people for purposes of voting
7. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (often capital) a style of type
[C16: from Latin centuria, from centum hundred]

cen•tu•ry

(ˈsɛn tʃə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a period of 100 years.
2. one of the successive periods of 100 years reckoned forward or backward from a recognized chronological epoch, esp. from the assumed date of the birth of Jesus.
3. any group or collection of 100.
4. a subdivision of the Roman legion, orig. consisting of 100 men.
5. one of the voting divisions of the ancient Roman people, each division having one vote.
[1525–35; < Latin centuria, derivative of cent(um) hundred]

Century

 a group of a hundred things; a period of one hundred years; a body of one hundred men or troops.
Examples: century of copies, 1867; of sultrying passions, 1598; of prayers, 1611; of sonnets, 1855; of troops; of words, 1737; of years.

century

A measure of time equal to 100 years.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.century - a period of 100 yearscentury - a period of 100 years    
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
millennium, millenary - a span of 1000 years
decade, decennary, decennium - a period of 10 years
quattrocento - the 15th century in Italian art and literature
twentieth century - the century from 1901 to 2000
half-century - a period of 50 years
quarter-century - a period of 25 years
2.century - ten 10scentury - ten 10s        
large integer - an integer equal to or greater than ten
Translations
eeu
قَرْنمِئَةُ جَوْلَهمِئَةُ سَنَه
stoletístovka
århundredehundredårhundrede pointårhundred
JahrhundertZenturie
jarcento
vuosisata
शताब्दी
stoljećevijek
évszázadszázad
abad
öldhundraî stig
世紀
1 세기
amžiusšimtinėšimtmetis
gadsimtssimts skrējienu
eeuwcenturie
stuleciewiekcenturia
secolveac
storočiestotinastovka
stoletjestotnija
stotina
århundradesekel
ศตวรรษ
yüzyılasıryüz sayı
thế kỷ

century

[ˈsentjʊrɪ] N
1. (= 100 years) → siglo m
in the 20th centuryen el siglo veinte
2. (Cricket) → cien puntos mpl, cien carreras fpl

century

[ˈsɛntʃəri] n
(= one hundred years) → siècle m
the 20th century → le vingtième siècle
the 21st century → le vingt et unième siècle
in the twentieth century → au vingtième siècle
(CRICKET) (= one hundred runs) → série f de cent courses

century

n
Jahrhundert nt; in the twentieth centuryim zwanzigsten Jahrhundert; (written) → im 20. Jahrhundert
(Cricket) → Hundert f

century

[ˈsɛntjʊrɪ] nsecolo; (in cricket) → cento punti
in the twentieth century → nel ventesimo secolo

century

(ˈsentʃəri) nounplural ˈcenturies
1. a (period of a) hundred years. the 19th century; for more than a century.
2. in cricket, a hundred runs. He has just made his second century this year.

century

قَرْن století århundrede Jahrhundert αιώνας siglo vuosisata siècle stoljeće secolo 世紀 1 세기 eeuw århundre stulecie século век århundrade ศตวรรษ yüzyıl thế kỷ 世纪
References in classic literature ?
If we had leisure to examine with the reader, one by one, the diverse traces of destruction imprinted upon the old church, time's share would be the least, the share of men the most, especially the men of art, since there have been individuals who assumed the title of architects during the last two centuries.
Time has caused the staircase to disappear, by raising the soil of the city with a slow and irresistible progress; but, while thus causing the eleven steps which added to the majestic height of the edifice, to be devoured, one by one, by the rising tide of the pavements of Paris,--time has bestowed upon the church perhaps more than it has taken away, for it is time which has spread over the façade that sombre hue of the centuries which makes the old age of monuments the period of their beauty.
Anglo-Saxon Poetry, on the Continent in prehistoric times before the migration to England, and in England especially during the Northumbrian Period, seventh and eighth centuries A.
Seven centuries elapsed before the next notice is found of the Fables of Aesop.
During the interval of three centuries which has elapsed since the publication of this volume of Nevelet's, no book, with the exception of the Holy Scriptures, has had a wider circulation than Aesop's Fables.
I was a Unique; and glad to know that that fact could not be dislodged or chal- lenged for thirteen centuries and a half, for sure.
In two or three little centuries it had converted a nation of men to a nation of worms.
GRANDFATHER was struck by Laurence's idea that the historic chair should utter a voice, and thus pour forth the collected wisdom of two centuries.
During an existence of more than two centuries you have had a familiar intercourse with men who were esteemed the wisest of their day.
So for centuries the Gaels of Ireland told their tales and handed them on from father to son undisturbed, and in Ireland a great many old writings have been kept which tell of far-off times.
Looking back across the seven centuries that have lapsed since Avis Everhard completed her manuscript, events, and the bearings of events, that were confused and veiled to her, are clear to us.
Little did she realize that the tortuous and distorted evolution of the next three centuries would compel a Third Revolt and a Fourth Revolt, and many Revolts, all drowned in seas of blood, ere the world-movement of labor should come into its own.