cephalopod


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ceph·a·lo·pod

 (sĕf′ə-lə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of various carnivorous marine mollusks of the class Cephalopoda, having a large head, a mouth with a chitinous beak surrounded by arms or tentacles, and in most species, an ink sac containing a dark fluid used for defense, and including the octopuses, squids, cuttlefishes, and nautiluses.

[From New Latin Cephalopoda, class name : cephalo- + -poda, -pod.]

ceph·a·lo·pod′ adj.

cephalopod

(ˈsɛfələˌpɒd)
n
(Animals) any marine mollusc of the class Cephalopoda, characterized by well-developed head and eyes and a ring of sucker-bearing tentacles. The group also includes the octopuses, squids, cuttlefish, and pearly nautilus
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Cephalopoda
ˌcephaˈlopodan adj, n

ceph•a•lo•pod

(ˈsɛf ə ləˌpɒd)

n.
any mollusk of the class Cephalopoda, having tentacles attached to the head, including the squid, octopus, and nautilus.
[1820–30; < New Latin Cephalopoda; see cephalo-, -pod]

ceph·a·lo·pod

(sĕf′ə-lə-pŏd′)
Any of various ocean mollusks, such as the octopus, squid, and nautilus, having long tentacles around the mouth, a large head, a pair of large eyes, and a sharp beak. Cephalopods have the most highly developed nervous system of all invertebrates. If attacked, they squirt a cloud of dark inky liquid to confuse predators and make their escape.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cephalopod - marine mollusk characterized by well-developed head and eyes and sucker-bearing tentaclescephalopod - marine mollusk characterized by well-developed head and eyes and sucker-bearing tentacles
mollusc, mollusk, shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
Cephalopoda, class Cephalopoda - octopuses; squids; cuttlefish; pearly nautilus
chambered nautilus, pearly nautilus, nautilus - cephalopod of the Indian and Pacific oceans having a spiral shell with pale pearly partitions
dibranch, dibranchiate, dibranchiate mollusk - cephalopods having two gills
octopod - a cephalopod with eight arms but lacking an internal shell
decapod - cephalopods having eight short tentacles plus two long ones
Adj.1.cephalopod - relating or belonging to the class Cephalopoda
Translations
hlavonožec
pääjalkainen
頭足類
References in classic literature ?
said Conseil; "cuttlefish, real cuttlefish of the cephalopod class?
Its eight arms, or rather feet, fixed to its head, that have given the name of cephalopod to these animals, were twice as long as its body, and were twisted like the furies' hair.
Yet if we compare the older Reptiles and Batrachians, the older Fish, the older Cephalopods, and the eocene Mammals, with the more recent members of the same classes, we must admit that there is some truth in the remark.
ABSTRACT The Correct cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis (Ehrenberg, 1831) is an abundant cephalopod in Persian Gulf and Oman Sea.
Tests of fresh skin samples from California two-spot octopuses (Octopus bimaculoides) show this ability clearly for the first time in any cephalopod, says Todd Oakley of the University of California, Santa Barbara.
They occurred in the brachiopod-trilobite-dominant biofacies and adjacent cephalopod limestone biofacies of the Kosov type according to Ferretti & Kriz (1995) (see Manda & Fryda 2014).
Ought not to forget that they enjoyed small jacks and blue runners, along with the occasional cephalopod, most likely squid.
Yu also went on to add that there is so much to learn from the cephalopod on the cellular level.
The report adds that while the soothsaying cephalopod correctly predicted the results of every match Germany played at the last FIFA World Cup, along with the result of the final, he developed a cult following in the process.
Figure 7 shows that mean intake of lead for the Vietnamesn population due to shellfish consumption estimated in our study is lower than the one for the population in Holland due to crab, shrimp, lobster, mussel, and cephalopod consumption (Sorkina, Bakker, van Donkersgoed, & van Klaveren, 2003).
We estimated the number of individual cephalopod prey from the maximum number of either upper or lower beaks (Table 4).