cerebral palsy


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cerebral palsy

n.
Any of a group of disorders of varying severity caused by brain injury usually at or before birth, resulting in impairment of muscle movement that may include spasticity, involuntary movement, or problems maintaining balance.

cer′e·bral-pal′sied adj.

cerebral palsy

n
(Pathology) a nonprogressive impairment of muscular function and weakness of the limbs, caused by lack of oxygen to the brain immediately after birth, brain injury during birth, or viral infection

cere′bral pal′sy


n.
a condition of muscular weakness and difficulty in coordinating voluntary movement owing to developmental or congenital damage to the brain.
[1920–25]
cere′bral pal′sied, adj.

cerebral palsy

A disorder caused by brain injury usually at or before birth, having symptoms that include poor muscle control and that often involve paralysis or abnormal stiffness of the muscles. Other forms of disability, such as mental retardation, may also be present.

cerebral palsy

The poor control over, or paralysis of, voluntary (under conscious control) muscles resulting from damage to the developing brain. Categories of disability caused by cerebral palsy include: diplegia , in which all four limbs are affected but the legs more severely than the arms; hemiplegia , in which the limbs on only one side of the body are affected; and quadriplegia, in which both arms and legs are severely affected.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cerebral palsy - a loss or deficiency of motor control with involuntary spasms caused by permanent brain damage present at birth
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Translations
dětská mozková obrna
detská mozgová obrna

cerebral palsy

[ˌsɛrɪbrəlˈpɔːlzɪ] nparalisi f inv cerebrale
References in periodicals archive ?
The main objectives of Cerebral Palsy Midlands are to empower disabled people in their everyday lives, support them in attaining greater independence, and to help them develop their skills and talents, highlighting that disability is no barrier to success and achievement.
Several factors have been shown to either cause or increase the likelihood of developing cerebral palsy.
Furthermore they said impairment Cerebral palsy is nonlife threatening with the exception of children born with severe cases, cerebral palsy is considered to be a nonlifethreatening condition.
Across 10 different areas of life, adolescents with cerebral palsy only ranked their quality of friend and peer relationships as on average lower than adolescents in the general population, challenging the widespread perception that adolescents with disabilities have unhappy, unfulfilled lives.
Staff at Stick 'n' Step, in Wallasey, recorded 60-second clips with children from across the region who attend the charity, which supports young people with cerebral palsy.
These data "offer additional evidence that the underlying causes of cerebral palsy extend beyond the clinical management of delivery.
Cerebral palsy is an abnormality of movement and postural tone that is acquired at an early age, even before birth.
Cerebral palsy generally causes impaired movement, rigidity of the limbs, involuntary movements, uneven or unsteady walking, atypical posture, or some combination of these symptoms, according to the Mayo Clinic in the United States.
During the CP Challenge, mountains are being climbed, virtually and metaphorically as folks with a variety of disabilities take on the challenge of getting out into the community to get fit, increase Cerebral Palsy awareness and raise funds.
A snapshot of the global therapeutic scenario for Cerebral Palsy.
Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children.
Ruth Scott, director of policy and campaigns, said: "People with cerebral palsy and parents of children with cerebral palsy often tell us that they find it difficult to get access to the right services - such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy to manage their condition - through the NHS.

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