ceremonious


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Related to ceremonious: all-around

cer·e·mo·ni·ous

 (sĕr′ə-mō′nē-əs)
adj.
1. Strictly observant of or devoted to ceremony, ritual, or etiquette; punctilious: "borne on silvery trays by ceremonious world-weary waiters" (Financial Times).
2.
a. Characterized by ceremony.
b. In accord with prescribed or customary usage; rigidly formal.

cer′e·mo′ni·ous·ly adv.
cer′e·mo′ni·ous·ness n.

ceremonious

(ˌsɛrɪˈməʊnɪəs)
adj
1. especially or excessively polite or formal
2. observing ceremony; involving formalities
ˌcereˈmoniously adv
ˌcereˈmoniousness n

cer•e•mo•ni•ous

(ˌsɛr əˈmoʊ ni əs)

adj.
1. carefully observant of ceremony.
2. marked by or consisting of ceremony; formal.
[1545–55; « Late Latin]
cer`e•mo′ni•ous•ly, adv.
cer`e•mo′ni•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ceremonious - characterized by pomp and ceremony and stately display
2.ceremonious - rigidly formal or bound by convention; "their ceremonious greetings did not seem heartfelt"
formal - being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress); "pay one's formal respects"; "formal dress"; "a formal ball"; "the requirement was only formal and often ignored"; "a formal education"

ceremonious

adjective
1. Fond of or given to ceremony:
2. Of or characterized by ceremony:
Translations
رَسْمي جِدّا، طَقْسي
formálníobřadní
ceremonielhøjtideligifølge protokollen
formlega kurteis
obradný

ceremonious

[ˌserɪˈməʊnɪəs] ADJceremonioso

ceremonious

adjförmlich, zeremoniös (geh)

ceremonious

[ˌsɛrɪˈməʊnɪəs] adjformale; (slightly pej) → cerimonioso/a

ceremony

(ˈserəməni) , ((American) -mouni) plural ˈceremonies noun
1. a sacred or formal act, eg a wedding, funeral etc. a marriage ceremony.
2. solemn display and formality. pomp and ceremony.
ˌcereˈmonial (-ˈməu-) adjective
formal or official. a ceremonial occasion such as the opening of parliament.
ˌcereˈmonially adverb
ˌcereˈmonious (-ˈməu-) adjective
(negative unceremonious) carefully formal or polite.
ˌcereˈmoniously adverb
References in classic literature ?
Woodhouse, a long, civil, ceremonious note, to say, with Mr.
But Conseil had one fault: he was ceremonious to a degree, and would never speak to me but in the third person, which was sometimes provoking.
My mother was all American - no alkali-spider about HER, I can tell you; she was of the best blood of Kentucky, the bluest Blue-grass aristocracy, very proud and acrimonious - or maybe it is ceremonious.
He took a ceremonious leave of the Crow chieftain, and his vagabond warriors, and according to previous arrangements, consigned to their cherishing friendship and fraternal adoption, their worthy confederate Rose; who, having figured among the water pirates of the Mississippi, was well fitted to rise to distinction among the land pirates of the Rocky Mountains.
Mr Jones, being now returned to his own bed (but from whence he returned we must beg to be excused from relating), summoned Partridge from this agreeable company, who, after a ceremonious preface, having obtained leave to offer his advice, delivered himself as follows:--
In spite of all this, towards the end of that day, everyone except the princess, who could not pardon Levin's action, became extraordinarily lively and good humored, like children after a punishment or grown-up people after a dreary, ceremonious reception, so that by the evening Vassenka's dismissal was spoken of, in the absence of the princess, as though it were some remote event.
There were to be no ceremonious performances, everything was to be as natural and homelike as possible, so when Aunt March arrived, she was scandalized to see the bride come running to welcome and lead her in, to find the bridegroom fastening up a garland that had fallen down, and to catch a glimpse of the paternal minister marching upstairs with a grave countenance and a wine bottle under each arm.
This was not a very ceremonious way of rendering homage to a patron saint; but, I believe Old Clem stood in that relation towards smiths.
The French officer likewise represented, with evident satisfaction, that under their tuition the king and queen had imbibed proper notions of their elevated station, and on all ceremonious occasions conducted themselves with suitable dignity.
Likewise I knew that, up to the time of my journey to Paris, she and the Frenchman had been more ceremonious towards our party--they had stood on a much more precise and delicate footing with them; but that now their acquaintanceship--their friendship, their intimacy--had taken on a much more off-hand and rough-and-ready air.
He is ceremonious, stately, most polite on every occasion to my Lady, and holds her personal attractions in the highest estimation.
A week after his arrival, the young Polish count, Willarski, whom Pierre had known slightly in Petersburg society, came into his room one evening in the official and ceremonious manner in which Dolokhov's second had called on him, and, having closed the door behind him and satisfied himself that there was nobody else in the room, addressed Pierre.