cervical cancer


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Related to cervical cancer: Ovarian cancer, Uterine cancer

cervical cancer

Cancer of the cervix (neck of the uterus).
Translations

cervical cancer

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References in periodicals archive ?
Growing prevalence of cervical cancer coupled with favorable government initiatives to drive global cervical cancer vaccine market through 2020
2014 marks a century since the husband-and-wife team of Dr George and Lady Andromache Papanicolaou first started their research at Cornell Medical College, New York, which ultimately led to the development of the Pap (Papanicolaou) test for early detection of cervical cancer.
Summary: Cervical cancer prevention should be a top priority for all women.
That means local women are putting themselves at greater risk of cervical cancer.
Abu Dhabi Up to 750 women die of cervical cancer each day across the world and the disease is among the leading causes of death amongst women in the UAE, according to Jala' Taha, head of the Department of Oncology at the Abu Dhabi Health Authority.
This article reviews the latest guidelines for cervical cancer screening published in 2009 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
Cervical cancer is preventable with early detection through regular screening.
These reflect the balance between providing enough screening to reduce cervical cancer and avoiding unnecessary costs of overtesting and of treatment due to false-positive results.
Addressing a seminar on inroads into the world of cervical cancer prevention as part of 13th biennial scientific conference organized by Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecologist of Pakistan, medical experts said that the second most fatal cancer amongst women, cervical cancer, can easily be prevented through vaccination.
Risk patterns since stopping the pill were largely reassuring, although some excess risk of cervical cancer persisted 10-15 years after stopping, and risk of brain or pituitary cancer persisted 20 or more years after stopping, a finding which could be due to prescription bias.
Analyses using pooled data from 24 studies conducted around the world have confirmed that pill users have an increased risk of developing cervical cancer but that the risk differential declines, and eventually disappears, when women stop using the method.
The link between oral contraceptive use and the risk of cervical cancer is already well-known, but this is the first time research has shown how long the effect lasts after the use of the Pill has stopped as well as quantifying the risks.