cetacean


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Related to cetacean: whale

ce·ta·cean

 (sĭ-tā′shən)
n.
Any of various marine mammals of the order Cetacea, including the whales, dolphins, and porpoises, having the general shape of a fish with forelimbs modified to form flippers, a tail with horizontal flukes, and one or two blowholes for breathing.

[From New Latin Cētācea, order name, from Latin cētus, whale; see Cetus.]

ce·ta′cean, ce·ta′ceous (-shəs) adj.

cetacean

(sɪˈteɪʃən)
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Cetacea, an order of aquatic placental mammals having no hind limbs and a blowhole for breathing: includes toothed whales (dolphins, porpoises, etc) and whalebone whales (rorquals, right whales, etc)
n
(Animals) a whale
[C19: from New Latin Cētācea, ultimately from Latin cētus whale, from Greek kētos]

ce•ta•cean

(sɪˈteɪ ʃən)

adj.
1. belonging to the Cetacea, an order of aquatic, chiefly marine mammals, including the whales and dolphins.
n.
2. a cetacean mammal.
[1830–40; < New Latin Cetace(a) (Latin cēt(us) whale, cetacean (< Greek kêtos)]
ce•ta′ceous, adj.

ce·ta·cean

(sĭ-tā′shən)
Any of various, often very large marine mammals having an almost hairless body that resembles that of a fish. Cetaceans have a flat, horizontal tail and forelimbs modified into broad flippers. Whales, dolphins, and porpoises are cetaceans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cetacean - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whalescetacean - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whales; dolphins; porpoises; narwhals
aquatic mammal - whales and dolphins; manatees and dugongs; walruses; seals
Cetacea, order Cetacea - an order of Eutheria
whale - any of the larger cetacean mammals having a streamlined body and breathing through a blowhole on the head
fluke - either of the two lobes of the tail of a cetacean
blowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skull
pod - a group of aquatic mammals
Adj.1.cetacean - of or relating to whales and dolphins etc
Translations

cetacean

[sɪˈteɪʃɪən]
A. ADJcetáceo
B. Ncetáceo m

cetacean

[sɪˈteɪʃən] ncétacé m

cetacean

nWal m, → Zetazee f (spec)
adjWal(fisch)-, Zetazeen- (spec)
References in classic literature ?
In plain prose, here are four whales as well known to the students of Cetacean History as Marius or Sylla to the classic scholar.
And though none of them precisely answer to any known species of the present time, they are yet sufficiently akin to them in general respects, to justify their taking ranks as Cetacean fossils.
The public demanded sharply that the seas should at any price be relieved from this formidable cetacean.
We can also understand the apparent paradox, that the very same characters are analogical when one class or order is compared with another, but give true affinities when the members of the same class or order are compared one with another: thus the shape of the body and fin-like limbs are only analogical when whales are compared with fishes, being adaptations in both classes for swimming through the water; but the shape of the body and fin-like limbs serve as characters exhibiting true affinity between the several members of the whale family; for these cetaceans agree in so many characters, great and small, that we cannot doubt that they have inherited their general shape of body and structure of limbs from a common ancestor.
The Southern California region represents the convergence of warm- and cold-water masses and supports populations of both warm- and cold-water, small cetacean species (Forney and Barlow, 1998).
1) None of Sea Shepherd's conflicts have caused more disputes about the role of international law, piracy, and international treaties than its attacks against the Institute of Cetacean Research (Institute), a collection of Japanese scientific researchers whose hunting methods ultimately kill whales.
Official authorities were alerted immediately after finding the Cetacean animal washed up near an islet "Fisht" to the north of Bahrain", said the daily quoting an official source.
Euthanasia is a tricky subject and often we will get an angry response from the public about having to put such magnificent creatures down, but the reasons are complex and often by launching a cetacean back into the water you are effectively prolonging its suffering.
The Royal Society for Wildlife Trusts' Marine Fighting Fund has given the money to Northumberland Wildlife Trust, working with the North East Cetacean Project, to carry out dolphin surveys along the county's shoreline, twice a week for the next 12 months.
The Ruth DeLynn Cetacean Ontological Collection at Mote Marine Laboratory has received accreditation by the American Society of Mammalogists (ASM), a nationwide mammal research society.
Harbour porpoises are the most common cetacean (whales and dolphin) found around British shores and the smallest cetacean.
Harbour porpoise are the most common cetacean (whales and dolphin) found around British shores and the smallest cetacean.