chagrin


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cha·grin

 (shə-grĭn′)
n.
A keen feeling of mental unease, as of annoyance or embarrassment, caused by failure, disappointment, or a disconcerting event: To her chagrin, the party ended just as she arrived.
tr.v. cha·grined, cha·grin·ing, cha·grins
To cause to feel chagrin; mortify or discomfit: He was chagrined at the poor sales of his book. See Synonyms at embarrass.

[French, possibly from dialectal French chagraigner, to distress, become gloomy, from Old French graim, sorrowful, gloomy, of Germanic origin.]

chagrin

(ˈʃæɡrɪn)
n
a feeling of annoyance or mortification
vb (tr)
to embarrass and annoy; mortify
[C17: from French chagrin, chagriner, of unknown origin]
ˈchagrined, ˈchagrinned adj

cha•grin

(ʃəˈgrɪn)

n., v. -grined -grinned, -grin•ing -grin•ning. n.
1. a feeling of vexation marked by disappointment or humiliation.
v.t.
2. to vex by disappointment or humiliation.
[1650–60; < French, Middle French, n. derivative of chagriner to upset]
syn: See shame.

chagrin


Past participle: chagrined
Gerund: chagrining

Imperative
chagrin
chagrin
Present
I chagrin
you chagrin
he/she/it chagrins
we chagrin
you chagrin
they chagrin
Preterite
I chagrined
you chagrined
he/she/it chagrined
we chagrined
you chagrined
they chagrined
Present Continuous
I am chagrining
you are chagrining
he/she/it is chagrining
we are chagrining
you are chagrining
they are chagrining
Present Perfect
I have chagrined
you have chagrined
he/she/it has chagrined
we have chagrined
you have chagrined
they have chagrined
Past Continuous
I was chagrining
you were chagrining
he/she/it was chagrining
we were chagrining
you were chagrining
they were chagrining
Past Perfect
I had chagrined
you had chagrined
he/she/it had chagrined
we had chagrined
you had chagrined
they had chagrined
Future
I will chagrin
you will chagrin
he/she/it will chagrin
we will chagrin
you will chagrin
they will chagrin
Future Perfect
I will have chagrined
you will have chagrined
he/she/it will have chagrined
we will have chagrined
you will have chagrined
they will have chagrined
Future Continuous
I will be chagrining
you will be chagrining
he/she/it will be chagrining
we will be chagrining
you will be chagrining
they will be chagrining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chagrining
you have been chagrining
he/she/it has been chagrining
we have been chagrining
you have been chagrining
they have been chagrining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chagrining
you will have been chagrining
he/she/it will have been chagrining
we will have been chagrining
you will have been chagrining
they will have been chagrining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chagrining
you had been chagrining
he/she/it had been chagrining
we had been chagrining
you had been chagrining
they had been chagrining
Conditional
I would chagrin
you would chagrin
he/she/it would chagrin
we would chagrin
you would chagrin
they would chagrin
Past Conditional
I would have chagrined
you would have chagrined
he/she/it would have chagrined
we would have chagrined
you would have chagrined
they would have chagrined
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chagrin - strong feelings of embarrassmentchagrin - strong feelings of embarrassment  
embarrassment - the shame you feel when your inadequacy or guilt is made public
Verb1.chagrin - cause to feel shamechagrin - cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of; "He humiliated his colleague by criticising him in front of the boss"
spite, wound, bruise, injure, offend, hurt - hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"
demolish, smash, crush - humiliate or depress completely; "She was crushed by his refusal of her invitation"; "The death of her son smashed her"
demean, disgrace, degrade, take down, put down - reduce in worth or character, usually verbally; "She tends to put down younger women colleagues"; "His critics took him down after the lecture"

chagrin

noun
verb
1. annoy, embarrass, humiliate, disquiet, vex, displease, mortify, discomfit, dissatisfy, discompose He was chagrined at missing such an easy goal.

chagrin

nounverb
To cause (a person) to be self-consciously distressed:
Translations
غَمٌّ، كَدَرٌ
zklamánízlost
ærgrelse
skapraun, vonbrigîi, gremja
graužatisnusivylimas
sarūgtinājumsvilšanās

chagrin

[ˈʃægrɪn]
A. N (= anger) → disgusto m; (= disappointment) → desilusión f, desazón f
to my chagrincon gran disgusto mío

chagrin

[ˈʃægrɪn] n (= annoyance) → contrariété f (= disappointment) → déception f
to sb's chagrin → à la déception de qn

chagrin

nÄrger m, → Verdruss m (geh)
vtärgern, verdrießen (geh); he was much chagrined by the newsdie Nachricht bekümmerte or verdross (geh)ihn sehr

chagrin

[ˈʃægrɪn] n (frm) → disappunto, dispiacere m

chagrin

(ˈʃӕgrin) , ((American) ʃəˈgrin) noun
disappointment and annoyance.
References in classic literature ?
But he could not take root in any of these; with chagrin, he found his masters invariably whimsical and irregular, constantly running about the country, or on the look-out for adventure.
French Frank, who, unknown to me, had swallowed his chagrin since the day before, now that the money for the Razzle Dazzle was in his pocket, began to behave curiously toward me.
Werper, with better success, traveled slowly onward until dawn, when, to his chagrin, he discovered a mounted Arab upon his trail.
The viceroy, hearing that I was returned to my residence, did not discover any concern or chagrin as at a disappointment, for such was his privacy and dissimulation that the most penetrating could never form any conjecture that could be depended on, about his designs, till everything was ready for the execution of them.
In her own past behaviour, there was a constant source of vexation and regret; and in the unhappy defects of her family, a constant source of vexation and regret; and in the unhappy defects of her family, a subject of yet heavier chagrin.
Nothing could equal the chagrin of Fitzpatrick and Bridger at being dogged by their inexperienced rivals, especially after their offer to divide the country with them.
Your Majesty,' but who, to his chagrin, got no title from me
Meantime, I searched, with great interest, the advertising columns of the newspapers, and wrote answers to every 'Wanted a Governess' that appeared at all eligible; but all my letters, as well as the replies, when I got any, were dutifully shown to my mother; and she, to my chagrin, made me reject the situations one after another: these were low people, these were too exacting in their demands, and these too niggardly in their remuneration.
The chagrin Wolf Larsen felt from being ignored by Maud Brewster and me in the conversation at table had to express itself in some fashion, and it fell to Thomas Mugridge to be the victim.
Kitty was distressed, as she always was, at parting for a couple of days from her husband, but when she saw his eager figure, looking big and strong in his shooting-boots and his white blouse, and a sort of sportsman elation and excitement incomprehensible to her, she forgot her own chagrin for the sake of his pleasure, and said good-bye to him cheerfully.
The bullet passed Numabo to lodge in the breast of a warrior behind him and as the fellow lunged forward with a scream the others turned and retreated, but to the lieutenant's chagrin they ran in the direction of the plane instead of back toward the forest so that he was still cut off from reaching his machine.
When we arrived within a short distance of the ridge, we were stopped by a mass of tall yellow reeds, growing together as thickly as they could stand, and as tough and stubborn as so many rods of steel; and we perceived, to our chagrin, that they extended midway up the elevation we proposed to ascend.