chagrined


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Related to chagrined: Cotise, interestingly, Quave

cha·grin

 (shə-grĭn′)
n.
A keen feeling of mental unease, as of annoyance or embarrassment, caused by failure, disappointment, or a disconcerting event: To her chagrin, the party ended just as she arrived.
tr.v. cha·grined, cha·grin·ing, cha·grins
To cause to feel chagrin; mortify or discomfit: He was chagrined at the poor sales of his book. See Synonyms at embarrass.

[French, possibly from dialectal French chagraigner, to distress, become gloomy, from Old French graim, sorrowful, gloomy, of Germanic origin.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.chagrined - feeling or caused to feel uneasy and self-consciouschagrined - feeling or caused to feel uneasy and self-conscious; "felt abashed at the extravagant praise"; "chagrined at the poor sales of his book"; "was embarrassed by her child's tantrums"
discomposed - having your composure disturbed; "looked about with a wandering and discomposed air"
Translations

chagrined

[ˈʃægrɪnd] adj (= upset) → contrarié(e)
References in classic literature ?
But the Madagonians were unsuccessful, which so chagrined them that never thereafter in all their land was a Novakatkan secure in property or life.
With a look of disgust and chagrined disappointment on his face, Professor Beecher turned to the other scientists and said:
Professor Beecher, young and foolish, would not consent to delve into the riches of the ancient city, being too much chagrined over the loss of the idol.
The following morning Abdul Mourak was enraged and chagrined to discover that this huge, black prisoner had escaped during the night, while Werper was terrified for the same reason, until his trembling fingers discovered the pouch still in its place beneath his shirt, and within it the hard outlines of its contents.
Chagrined and surprised, they were obliged, though unwillingly, to turn back, for no shelter was nearer than their own house.
Could Go-lat have known what passed through her mind, he must have been terribly chagrined, though the chances are that he would have attributed it to a lack of discernment on her part.
You will observe, monsieur, and tell me what you think; I could so much better rely on your opinion than on my own; women cannot judge of these things as men can, and, excuse my pertinacity, monsieur, but it is natural I should feel interested about this poor little girl (pauvre petite); she has scarcely any relations, her own efforts are all she has to look to, her acquirements must be her sole fortune; her present position has once been mine, or nearly so; it is then but natural I should sympathize with her; and sometimes when I see the difficulty she has in managing pupils, I reel quite chagrined.
I was chagrined, and then I insisted stoutly with myself that, as it was not Mary, it must be Mary's jacket.