chaise

(redirected from chaises)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to chaises: IKEA

chaise

 (shāz)
n.
1. Any of various light open carriages, often with a collapsible hood, especially a two-wheeled carriage drawn by one horse.
2. A post chaise.
3. A chaise longue.

[French, chair, variant of Old French chaiere; see chair.]

chaise

(ʃeɪz)
n
1. a light open horse-drawn carriage, esp one with two wheels designed for two passengers
3. (Historical Terms) a gold coin first issued in France in the 14th century, depicting the king seated on a throne
[C18: from French, variant of Old French chaiere chair]

chaise

(ʃeɪz)

n.
1. a light, open carriage, usu. with a hood, esp. a one-horse, two-wheeled carriage for two persons; shay.
3. a chaise longue, esp. a light one used out of doors.
[1695–1705; < French: chair, dial. alter. (with assibilation of -r-) of chaire chair]

Chaise

A light vehicle for personal transportation. Originally two-wheeled, and pulled by one horse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chaise - a long chairchaise - a long chair; for reclining    
chair - a seat for one person, with a support for the back; "he put his coat over the back of the chair and sat down"
2.chaise - a carriage consisting of two wheels and a calash top; drawn by a single horse
calash top, caleche, calash - the folding hood of a horse-drawn carriage
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
Translations

chaise

n (Hist) → Einspänner m
References in classic literature ?
And he asked in an injured tone what had become of all those old square-topped chaises, with wings sticking out on either side, that used to be drawn by a plough-horse, and driven by a farmer's wife and daughter, peddling whortle-berries and blackberries about the town.
It is always good for young people to be put upon exerting themselves; and you know, my dear Catherine, you always were a sad little scatter-brained creature; but now you must have been forced to have your wits about you, with so much changing of chaises and so forth; and I hope it will appear that you have not left anything behind you in any of the pockets.
A heroine returning, at the close of her career, to her native village, in all the triumph of recovered reputation, and all the dignity of a countess, with a long train of noble relations in their several phaetons, and three waiting-maids in a travelling chaise and four, behind her, is an event on which the pen of the contriver may well delight to dwell; it gives credit to every conclusion, and the author must share in the glory she so liberally bestows.
Her coaches and chaises all went back, and the guards too; and I scoured into the marketplace for shelter.
There are farmers about here - and farmers have light carts, or chaises, or something of the sort.
I have ordered your chaise," he said; "and I can tell you what I propose doing on our way to the stable-yard.
It is surprising that they are caught here -- that in this deep and capacious spring, far beneath the rattling teams and chaises and tinkling sleighs that travel the Walden road, this great gold and emerald fish swims.
On the next Tuesday morning at four o'clock hot coffee was going on in the housekeeper's and matron's rooms; boys wrapped in great-coats and mufflers were swallowing hasty mouthfuls, rushing about, tumbling over luggage, and asking questions all at once of the matron; outside the School-gates were drawn up several chaises and the four-horse coach which Tom's party had chartered, the postboys in their best jackets and breeches, and a cornopean player, hired for the occasion, blowing away "A southerly wind and a cloudy sky," waking all peaceful inhabitants half-way down the High Street.
Pickwick also; and under the influence of which, that gentleman got himself into complicated entanglements with harness, and mixed up with horses and wheels of chaises, in the most surprising manner, firmly believing that by so doing he was materially forwarding the preparations for their resuming their journey.
The coming to a town--people busy in the markets; light carts and chaises round the tavern yard; tradesmen standing at their doors; men running horses up and down the street for sale; pigs plunging and grunting in the dirty distance, getting off with long strings at their legs, running into clean chemists' shops and being dislodged with brooms by 'prentices; the night coach changing horses--the passengers cheerless, cold, ugly, and discontented, with three months' growth of hair in one night--the coachman fresh as from a band-box, and exquisitely beautiful by contrast:--so much bustle, so many things in motion, such a variety of incidents--when was there a journey with so many delights as that journey in the waggon!
Pity and softened memory took place of the old antagonism, and in his busy thoughts about the future, as the chaise carried him rapidly along towards the home where he was now to be master, there was a continually recurring effort to remember anything by which he could show a regard for his grandfather's wishes, without counteracting his own cherished aims for the good of the tenants and the estate.
I am sorry, my dear, you have such an objection to the Maypole and old John, for otherways as it's a very fine morning, and Saturday's not a busy day with us, we might have all three gone to Chigwell in the chaise, and had quite a happy day of it.