chalice


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chal·ice

 (chăl′ĭs)
n.
1. A cup or goblet.
2. A cup for the consecrated wine of the Eucharist.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin calix, calic-.]

chalice

(ˈtʃælɪs)
n
1. poetic a drinking cup; goblet
2. (Roman Catholic Church) Christianity a gold or silver cup containing the wine at Mass
3. (Botany) the calyx of a flower, esp a cup-shaped calyx
[C13: from Old French, from Latin calix cup; related to Greek kalux calyx]

chal•ice

(ˈtʃæl ɪs)

n.
1. a cup for the wine of the Eucharist.
2. a drinking cup or goblet.
3. a cuplike blossom.
[1350–1400; < Old French < Latin calicem < calix cup; compare early Middle English caliz < Anglo-French, Old English cælc, calic < Latin]

chalice

- From Latin calix, "cup," and Greek kalux, "pod."
See also related terms for pod.

chalice


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Used in modern witchcraft, this is a cup or goblet often associated with the element Water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chalice - a bowl-shaped drinking vesselchalice - a bowl-shaped drinking vessel; especially the Eucharistic cup
cup - a small open container usually used for drinking; usually has a handle; "he put the cup back in the saucer"; "the handle of the cup was missing"
Translations
كأسُ نَبيذ، كأسُ القُرْبان
kalichpohár
bægerkalk
kehely
bikar; kaleikur
taurė
biķerisvīna kauss
kalich
kelih

chalice

[ˈtʃælɪs] N (Rel) → cáliz m
see also poison B2

chalice

[ˈtʃælɪs] ncalice m poisoned chalice

chalice

n (poet, Eccl) → Kelch m

chalice

[ˈtʃælɪs] ncalice m

chalice

(ˈtʃӕlis) noun
a wine-cup, especially one used in religious services.
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of silverware, a crucifix, candle sticks, chalice and a communion set were taken, as well as the trolley used for the food bank had gone.
What was left behind is a landscape Chalice described as visually challenging --bleak, even.
Chalice Gold managing director Tim Goyder said the stock placement would give Chalice exposure to a relatively advanced, low-risk, open-pit gold mine in WA.
Chalice was left with a lumpy tum while Will emerged with "ridiculously hard" pecs which eventually turned fatty - while a cosmetic "six pack" turned into a sizeable pot.
For us Filipinos, celebrating the Holy Week in Valencia and the discovery of Christ's chalice proved an exhilarating and memorable experience
The Historical Novel Society, in a recent review, praised the literary historical novel The Golden Chalice of Hunahpu: A Novel of the Spanish Attack on the Maya (Full Court Press, 2014).
Abbey prior Father Joseph said the chalice, which contains the communion wine, had been used in every service and new monks' ordination since it was struck in 1861.
The chalice, kept in a velvet bag, is said to have been on loan to a sick woman due to its healing powers when it was stolen in Weston-under -Penyard, Herefordshire.
Police Community Support Officer Ben Hopson, from Dewsbury and Mirfield Neighbourhood Policing Team, said: "The suspect returns numerous times to steal from the charity/ collection box situated inside the main church and also a silver chalice has been stolen.
The chalice of the mother church of Santiago de Rio Meao is a good example of this description, "not very rich, practical, but already subject to a careful treatment" (24), which probably dates from the late fifteenth century and early sixteenth (Fig.
The unit to be acquired provides a high throughput screening (cHTS) platform, which, combined with the company's Chalice analysis platform, enables the discovery of specific combinations of drugs that have the potential to treat serious diseases.
The Spaniards, Margarita Torres and Jose Ortega del Rio, spent three years studying the history of the chalice and last week published a book, 'The Kings of the Grail,' making their case.