chalybeate


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cha·lyb·e·ate

 (kə-lĭb′ē-ĭt, -lē′bē-)
adj.
1. Impregnated with or containing salts of iron.
2. Tasting like iron, as water from a mineral spring.
n.
Water or medicine containing iron in solution.

[New Latin chalybeātus, from Latin chalybs, steel, from Greek khalups, khalub-, possibly from Khalups sing. of Khalubes, Chalybes, people of Asia Minor famous for their steel.]

chalybeate

(kəˈlɪbɪɪt)
adj
(Chemistry) containing or impregnated with iron salts
n
(Pharmacology) any drug containing or tasting of iron
[C17: from New Latin chalybēātus, ultimately from khalups iron]

cha•lyb•e•ate

(kəˈlɪb i ɪt, -ˌeɪt)

adj.
1. containing or impregnated with salts of iron, as a mineral spring or medicine.
n.
2. a chalybeate water, medicine, or the like.
[1625–35; < New Latin chalybēātus < Latin chalybē(ïus) of iron (< Greek s. chalyb- iron, steel, after the Chálybes people of Asia Minor famous for their steel)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.chalybeate - containing or impregnated with or tasting of iron
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I have been informed since, by various eminent medical gentlemen, that the alcohol must have entirely counteracted the effects of the chalybeate properties contained in the water.
I invented a name for the town, a code of laws for the inhabitants, productions, antiquities, chalybeate springs, population, statistics of crime, and so on, while I walked about the streets, looked in at the shop-windows, and attentively examined the Market-place and Town-hall.
Telephone 01443 772789 JONES Eileen Yn dawel ar ddydd Iau, y 15ed o Chwefror 2018 yn Ysbyty Bronglais, Eileen o 14 Chalybeate Gardens Aberaeron.
The Chalybeate (contains iron) spring in St James' cemetery was discovered in 1773 by a group of quarry men on the eastern side of the graveyard that is overlooked by Liverpool cathedral.
This historic village is mostly known for its traditional woollen mills and the chalybeate spa, whose iron rich waters were known to have first been used by the Romans.
Viduidae Vidua macroura Pin-tailed whydah Vidua orientalis Sahel paradise whydah Vidua chalybeate Village indigobird Euplectes spp Widow bird
As early as the 14th century, the town's chalybeate springs (iron-rich water) were recognised as a remedy for all manner of ailments.
Tunbridge Wells is a spa town and you can taste the water at Chalybeate Spring in The Pantiles.
Surprisingly, the Fish Sands were also the setting for a chalybeate spring - one rich in salts of iron.
It was built over the Engine Well, a chalybeate mineral spring, which from the 1820s helped establish Tynemouth as a heath resort.
These medicinal waters are of two sorts, the chalybeate and the sulphur; of the former, there are two springs at High-Harrogate, the most ancient of which, called the OLD SPAW, is near the Granby Inn.