chamberlain


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Related to chamberlain: Lord Chamberlain, Joseph Chamberlain

cham·ber·lain

 (chām′bər-lən)
n.
1.
a. An officer who manages the household of a sovereign or noble; a chief steward.
b. A high-ranking official in various royal courts.
2. An official who receives the rents and fees of a municipality; a treasurer.
3. Roman Catholic Church
a. A papal gentleman. No longer in use.
b. A camerlengo.

[Middle English chaumberlein, from Old French chamberlenc, from Frankish *kamerling : Late Latin camera, chamber; see chamber + Germanic *-linga-, one connected with; see -ling1.]

chamberlain

(ˈtʃeɪmbəlɪn)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an officer who manages the household of a king
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the steward of a nobleman or landowner
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the treasurer of a municipal corporation
[C13: from Old French chamberlayn, of Frankish origin; related to Old High German chamarling chamberlain, Latin camera chamber]
ˈchamberlainˌship n

Chamberlain

(ˈtʃeɪmbəlɪn)
n
1. (Biography) Sir (Joseph) Austen. 1863–1937, British Conservative statesman; foreign secretary (1924–29); awarded a Nobel peace prize for his negotiation of the Locarno Pact (1925)
2. (Biography) his father, Joseph. 1836–1914, British statesman; originally a Liberal, he resigned in 1886 over Home Rule for Ireland and became leader of the Liberal Unionists; a leading advocate of preferential trading agreements with members of the British Empire
3. (Biography) his son, (Arthur) Neville. 1869–1940, British Conservative statesman; prime minister (1937–40): pursued a policy of appeasement towards Germany; following the German invasion of Poland, he declared war on Germany on Sept 3, 1939
4. (Biography) Owen. 1920–2006, US physicist, who discovered the antiproton. Nobel prize for physics jointly with Emilio Segré 1959

cham•ber•lain

(ˈtʃeɪm bər lɪn)

n.
1. an official who manages the living quarters of a sovereign or member of the nobility.
2. the high steward or factor of a member of the nobility.
3. a high official of a royal court.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French, variant of chamberlenc < Frankish *kamerling=kamer (< Latin camera room; see chamber) + -ling -ling1]

Cham•ber•lain

(ˈtʃeɪm bər lɪn)

n.
1. (Arthur) Neville, 1869–1940, British prime minister 1937–40.
2. Sir (Joseph) Austen, 1863–1937, British statesman: Nobel peace prize 1925.
3. Wilt(on Norman) ( “Wilt the Stilt” ), 1936–99, U.S. basketball player.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chamberlain - British statesman who as Prime Minister pursued a policy of appeasement toward fascist Germany (1869-1940)Chamberlain - British statesman who as Prime Minister pursued a policy of appeasement toward fascist Germany (1869-1940)
2.chamberlain - the treasurer of a municipal corporation
financial officer, treasurer - an officer charged with receiving and disbursing funds
3.chamberlain - an officer who manages the household of a king or nobleman
steward - someone who manages property or other affairs for someone else
Translations

chamberlain

[ˈtʃeɪmbəlɪn] Nchambelán m, gentilhombre m de cámara

chamberlain

nKammerherr m

chamberlain

[ˈtʃeɪmbəlɪn] nciambellano
References in classic literature ?
You gave him a cool nod, and just now you bowed and smiled in the politest way to Tommy Chamberlain, whose father keeps a grocery store.
In those times a bed was always to be got there at any hour of the night, and the chamberlain, letting me in at his ready wicket, lighted the candle next in order on his shelf, and showed me straight into the bedroom next in order on his list.
He called upon his chamberlain as he gave the signal for retiring from the lists, and commanded him instantly to gallop to Ashby, and seek out Isaac the Jew.
And she was far stricter on that point than the Lord Chamberlain, who had, she held, betrayed his trust by practically turning Leveller.
This lord, in conjunction with Flimnap the high-treasurer, whose enmity against you is notorious on account of his lady, Limtoc the general, Lalcon the chamberlain, and Balmuff the grand justiciary, have prepared articles of impeachment against you, for treason and other capital crimes.
de Saint-Meran's oldest friends, and chamberlain to the Comte d'Artois, "that the Holy Alliance purpose removing him from thence?
she cried to an old servant who, dressed in a frock coat and white waistcoat, had a bald, red head (he was the chamberlain who always accompanied her on her journeys).
Indeed, it is by no means certain that the occupation would ever have been successful had not one of the three brothers, Paul, despicably, but very decisively declined to abide these things any longer, and, by surrendering all the secrets of the insurrection, ensured its overthrow and his own ultimate promotion to the post of chamberlain to Prince Otto.
At last the princess agreed, but she told her chamberlain to give the prince a sleeping draught, that he might not hear or see her.
On whom even the fine arts, attending in powder and walking backward like the Lord Chamberlain, must array themselves in the milliners' and tailors' patterns of past generations and be particularly careful not to be in earnest or to receive any impress from the moving age.
Chamberlain, take these people over to my brother, the Grand Duke's, and give them a square meal.
Messire Louis de Graville, chevalier, councillor, and chamberlain of the king, admiral of France, keeper of the Forest of Vincennes