chammy


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Related to chammy: chammy leather

cham·ois

 (shăm′wä′, shăm′wä′, shăm′ē)
n. pl. cham·ois (shăm′wä′, shăm′wä′, shăm′ēz)
1. Either of two species of agile goat antelopes (Rupicapra rupicapra or R. pyrenaica) of mountainous regions of Europe and western Asia, having upright horns with backward-hooked tips.
2. (shăm′ē) also cham·my or sham·my pl. cham·mies
a. A soft leather made from the hide of these antelopes or of other animals such as deer or sheep.
b. A piece of such leather or of a fabric or material made to resemble it, used as a polishing or drying cloth or in shirts.
3. (shăm′wä′, shăm′wä′, shăm′ē) A moderate to grayish yellow.

[French, from Middle French, from Old French, from Late Latin camōx, of pre-Roman Alpine origin and perhaps ultimately from Celtic *kambo-, crooked (in reference to the hooked horns of the chamois; compare Old Irish and Middle Welsh camm, crooked).]

chammy

(ˈʃæmɪ)
n, pl -mies
informal a piece of chamois leather used for polishing

cham•ois

(ˈʃæm i; for 1 also ʃæmˈwɑ)

n., pl. cham•ois, cham•oix (ˈʃæm iz; for 1 also ʃæmˈwɑ) n.
1. an agile goat antelope, Rupicapra rupicapra, of high mountains of Europe.
2. a soft, pliable leather from any of various skins dressed with oil.
3. a piece of this leather.
4. a cotton cloth simulating this leather.
v.t.
5. to dress (a pelt) to produce chamois.
6. to rub or buff with a chamois.
Also, chammy , shammy (for defs. 2–4, 6, 7).
[1525–35; < Middle French < Late Latin camox]

chammy


Past participle: chammied
Gerund: chammying

Imperative
chammy
chammy
Present
I chammy
you chammy
he/she/it chammies
we chammy
you chammy
they chammy
Preterite
I chammied
you chammied
he/she/it chammied
we chammied
you chammied
they chammied
Present Continuous
I am chammying
you are chammying
he/she/it is chammying
we are chammying
you are chammying
they are chammying
Present Perfect
I have chammied
you have chammied
he/she/it has chammied
we have chammied
you have chammied
they have chammied
Past Continuous
I was chammying
you were chammying
he/she/it was chammying
we were chammying
you were chammying
they were chammying
Past Perfect
I had chammied
you had chammied
he/she/it had chammied
we had chammied
you had chammied
they had chammied
Future
I will chammy
you will chammy
he/she/it will chammy
we will chammy
you will chammy
they will chammy
Future Perfect
I will have chammied
you will have chammied
he/she/it will have chammied
we will have chammied
you will have chammied
they will have chammied
Future Continuous
I will be chammying
you will be chammying
he/she/it will be chammying
we will be chammying
you will be chammying
they will be chammying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chammying
you have been chammying
he/she/it has been chammying
we have been chammying
you have been chammying
they have been chammying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chammying
you will have been chammying
he/she/it will have been chammying
we will have been chammying
you will have been chammying
they will have been chammying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chammying
you had been chammying
he/she/it had been chammying
we had been chammying
you had been chammying
they had been chammying
Conditional
I would chammy
you would chammy
he/she/it would chammy
we would chammy
you would chammy
they would chammy
Past Conditional
I would have chammied
you would have chammied
he/she/it would have chammied
we would have chammied
you would have chammied
they would have chammied
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chammy - a soft suede leather formerly from the skin of the chamois antelope but now from sheepskinchammy - a soft suede leather formerly from the skin of the chamois antelope but now from sheepskin
leather - an animal skin made smooth and flexible by removing the hair and then tanning
wash leather - piece of chamois used for cleaning and polishing
Translations

chammy

[ˈʃæmɪ] Ngamuza f
References in periodicals archive ?
It's about as dexterous as driving through an automated car wash, rather than spending a Sunday morning polishing away with (oh, the excitement of it) a new chammy leather.
Dr Geoffrey Scott Carroll, the Scots-born business man in charge of this 'shoogle your chammy and waggle your wallies' event, has admitted that when it was launched two years ago it was only ever meant to be 'a one-off p**s-up'.
Just plug the special pack onto the end of your hose and you'll never have to chammy again.