chancery


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chan·cer·y

 (chăn′sə-rē)
n. pl. chan·cer·ies
1. Law
a. A court of chancery.
b. The proceedings and practice of a court of chancery; equity.
c. A court of public record; an office of archives.
d. One of the five divisions of the High Court of Justice of Great Britain, presided over by the Lord High Chancellor.
2. The office or department of a chancellor; a chancellery.

[Middle English chancerie, alteration of chancelrie; see chancellery.]

chancery

(ˈtʃɑːnsərɪ)
n, pl -ceries
1. (Law) Also called: Chancery Division (in England) the Lord Chancellor's court, now a division of the High Court of Justice
2. (Law) Also called: court of chancery (in the US) a court of equity
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Brit the political section or offices of an embassy or legation
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for chancellery
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a court of public records; archives
6. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a diocesan office under the supervision of a bishop's chancellor, having custody of archives, issuing official enactments, etc
7. (Law) law (of a suit) pending in a court of equity
8. (Wrestling) wrestling boxing (of a competitor's head) locked under an opponent's arm
[C14: shortened from chancellery]

chan•cer•y

(ˈtʃæn sə ri, ˈtʃɑn-)

n., pl. -cer•ies.
1. the office or department of a chancellor; chancellery.
2. an office of public records.
3. Brit. the Lord Chancellor's court, a division of the High Court of Justice.
4.
a. a court of equity.
5. the administrative office of a diocese.
[1325–75; Middle English chancerie, variant of chancelrie, syncopated variant of chancellerie chancellery]

chancery

The building upon a diplomatic or consular compound which houses the offices of the chief of mission or principal officer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chancery - a court with jurisdiction in equity
court, judicature, tribunal - an assembly (including one or more judges) to conduct judicial business
2.chancery - an office of archives for public or ecclesiastic records; a court of public records
archive - a depository containing historical records and documents
Translations

chancery

[ˈtʃɑːnsərɪ] N
1. (Brit) (Jur) (also Chancery Division) sala del High Court que se ocupa de causas de derecho privado
ward in chancery pupilo/a bajo la protección del tribunal
2. (US) = chancellery
3. (US) (Jur) (also Court of Chancery) → tribunal m de equidad

Chancery

[ˈtʃɑːnsəri] ncour f de la chancellerie

chancery

n ward in chanceryMündel ntin Amtsvormundschaft
References in classic literature ?
It turned out to be Captain Bildad, who along with Captain Peleg was one of the largest owners of the vessel; the other shares, as is sometimes the case in these ports, being held by a crowd of old annuitants; widows, fatherless children, and chancery wards; each owning about the value of a timber head, or a foot of plank, or a nail or two in the ship.
Upon what I said in relation to our courts of justice, his majesty desired to be satisfied in several points: and this I was the better able to do, having been formerly almost ruined by a long suit in chancery, which was decreed for me with costs.
Some well-intentioned men in this State, deriving their notions from the language and forms which obtain in our courts, have been induced to consider it as an implied supersedure of the trial by jury, in favor of the civil-law mode of trial, which prevails in our courts of admiralty, probate, and chancery.
He was never seen on 'Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the "City"; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln's Inn, or Gray's Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen's Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts.
And there was also, I remember, a clergyman who wanted to be a lunatic, or a lunatic who wanted to be a clergyman, I forget which, but I know the Court of Chancery investigated the matter, and decided that he was quite sane.
Now and then he met an obstinate fellow who insisted on his money, and who talked of suits in chancery.
But at present one might fancy the house in the early stage of a chancery suit, and that the fruit from that grand double row of walnut-trees on the right hand of the enclosure would fall and rot among the grass, if it were not that we heard the booming bark of dogs echoing from great buildings at the back.
These, however, when they do take place, produce no unhappiness, and are preceded by no bickerings; for the simple reason, than an ill-used wife or a henpecked husband is not obliged to file a bill in Chancery to obtain a divorce.
Second man at Johnson and Merivale's, 41 Chancery Lane.
A Chancery judge once had the kindness to inform me, as one of a company of some hundred and fifty men and women not labouring under any suspicions of lunacy, that the Court of Chancery, though the shining subject of much popular prejudice (at which point I thought the judge's eye had a cast in my direction), was almost immaculate.
IT is said that the world is in a state of bankruptcy; that the world owes the world more than the world can pay, and ought to go into chancery and be sold.
She had made a success of her business, and now had an office in Chancery Lane; she did little typing herself, but spent her time correcting the work of the four girls she employed.