change


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change

 (chānj)
v. changed, chang·ing, chang·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be different: change the spelling of a word.
b. To give a completely different form or appearance to; transform: changed the yard into a garden.
2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: change places.
3. To exchange for or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category: change one's name; a light that changes colors.
4.
a. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides.
b. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes.
5. To give or receive the equivalent of (money) in lower denominations or in foreign currency.
6. To put a fresh covering on: change a bed; change the baby.
v.intr.
1. To become different or undergo alteration: He changed as he matured.
2. To undergo transformation or transition: The music changed to a slow waltz.
3. To go from one phase to another, as the moon or the seasons.
4. To make an exchange: If you prefer this seat, I'll change with you.
5. To transfer from one conveyance to another: She changed in Chicago on her way to the coast.
6. To put on other clothing: We changed for dinner.
7. To become deeper in tone: His voice began to change at age 13.
n.
1. The act, process, or result of altering or modifying: a change in facial expression.
2. The replacing of one thing for another; substitution: a change of atmosphere; a change of ownership.
3. A transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another: the change of seasons.
4. Something different; variety: ate early for a change.
5. A different or fresh set of clothing.
6.
a. Money of smaller denomination given or received in exchange for money of higher denomination.
b. The balance of money returned when an amount given is more than what is due.
c. Coins: had change jingling in his pocket.
7. Music
a. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
b. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
8. A market or exchange where business is transacted.
Phrasal Verb:
change off
1. To alternate with another person in performing a task.
2. To perform two tasks at once by alternating or a single task by alternate means.
Idioms:
change hands
To pass from one owner to another.
change (one's) mind
To reverse a previously held opinion or an earlier decision.
change (one's) tune
To alter one's approach or attitude.

[Middle English changen, from Norman French chaunger, from Latin cambiāre, cambīre, to exchange, probably of Celtic origin.]

change

(tʃeɪndʒ)
vb
1. to make or become different; alter
2. (tr) to replace with or exchange for another: to change one's name.
3. (sometimes foll by: to or into) to transform or convert or be transformed or converted
4. to give and receive (something) in return; interchange: to change places with someone.
5. (tr) to give or receive (money) in exchange for the equivalent sum in a smaller denomination or different currency
6. (tr) to remove or replace the coverings of: to change a baby.
7. (when: intr, may be foll by into or out of) to put on other clothes
8. (Astronomy) (intr) (of the moon) to pass from one phase to the following one
9. (Automotive Engineering) to operate (the gear lever of a motor vehicle) in order to alter the gear ratio: to change gear.
10. to alight from (one bus, train, etc) and board another
11. (Surveying) change face to rotate the telescope of a surveying instrument through 180° horizontally and vertically, taking a second sighting of the same object in order to reduce error
12. change feet informal to put on different shoes, boots, etc
13. (Military) military to redeploy (a force in the field) so that its main weight of weapons points in another direction
14. to alter one's attitude, opinion, etc
15. change hands to pass from one owner to another
16. change one's mind to alter one's decision or opinion
17. change one's tune to alter one's attitude or tone of speech
n
18. the act or fact of changing or being changed
19. a variation, deviation, or modification
20. the substitution of one thing for another; exchange
21. anything that is or may be substituted for something else
22. variety or novelty (esp in the phrase for a change): I want to go to France for a change.
23. a different or fresh set, esp of clothes
24. (Commerce) money given or received in return for its equivalent in a larger denomination or in a different currency
25. (Commerce) the balance of money given or received when the amount tendered is larger than the amount due
26. coins of a small denomination regarded collectively
27. (Commerce) (often capital) archaic a place where merchants meet to transact business; exchange
28. the act of passing from one state or phase to another
29. (Astronomy) the transition from one phase of the moon to the next
30. (Music, other) the order in which a peal of bells may be rung
31. (Athletics (Track & Field)) sport short for changeover3b
32. slang desirable or useful information
33. obsolete fickleness or caprice
34. change of heart a profound change of outlook, opinion, etc
35. get no change out of someone slang not to be successful in attempts to exploit or extract information from someone
36. ring the changes to vary the manner or performance of an action that is often repeated
[C13: from Old French changier, from Latin cambīre to exchange, barter]
ˈchangeless adj
ˈchangelessly adv
ˈchangelessness n
ˈchanger n

change

(tʃeɪndʒ)

v. changed, chang•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to make different in form: to change one's name.
2. to transform (usu. fol. by into): The witch changed the prince into a toad.
3. to exchange for another or others: to change shoes.
4. to give and take reciprocally: to change places with someone.
5. to transfer from one (conveyance) to another.
6. to give or get smaller money in exchange for.
7. to give or get foreign money in exchange for.
8. to remove and replace the coverings or garments of: to change a bed; to change a baby.
v.i.
9. to become different: The nation's mood has changed.
10. to become altered or modified: Colors change when exposed to the sun.
11. to become transformed (usu. fol. by into): The toad changed back into a prince.
12. to pass gradually into (usu. fol. by to or into): Summer changed to autumn.
13. to make an exchange.
14. to transfer between conveyances.
15. to change one's clothes.
16. (of the moon) to pass from one phase to another.
17. (of the voice) to become deeper in tone.
18. change off,
a. to take turns with another, as at doing a task.
b. to alternate between two tasks or between a task and a rest break.
n.
19. the act of changing or the result of being changed.
20. a transformation or modification: a change of expression.
21. a variation or deviation: a change in one's routine.
22. the substitution of one thing for another.
23. a replacement or substitution.
24. a fresh set of clothes.
25. variety or novelty: He's not one who likes change.
26. the passing from one state, phase, etc., to another: social change.
27. a modulation in jazz.
28. the money returned when the sum offered in payment is larger than the sum due.
29. coins of low denomination.
30. any of the various sequences in which a peal of bells may be rung.
31. Brit. exchange (def. 9).
Idioms:
change one's mind, to modify or reverse one's opinions or intentions.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French changer < Late Latin cambiāre, Latin cambīre to exchange]
chang′er, n.
syn: change, alter both mean to make a difference in the state or condition of a thing. To change is to make a material or radical difference or to substitute one thing for another of the same kind: to change a lock; to change one's plans. To alter is to make some partial change, as in appearance, but usu. to preserve the identity: to alter a garment; to alter a contract.

Change


constructive metabolism.
misoneism.
1. the metabolic process in which energy is liberated for use in work.
2. destructive metabolism.
the process of an agent that affects a chemical or other reaction without being itself changed or affected. See also decaying. — catalyst, n.
the chemical and physical processes in an organism by which protoplasm is produced, sustained, and then decomposed to make energy available. Also, Rare. metaboly. — metabolize, v.
change in form, structure, shape, appearance, etc. See also geology. — metamorphic, adj.
1. change in form, structure, appearance, etc.
2. magical transformation. — metamorphic, metamorphous, adj.
a change of form or type.
an abnormal dislike of novelty or innovation. Also called neophobia, cainotophobia, cainophobia.
misoneism.
1. the principle or concept of growth and change in nature.
2. nature considered as the source of growth and change.
3. something that grows or develops.
the process of complete and usually extreme or grotesque change from one state or form to another.
the process or act of change, especially from one thing to another, as the change from base metal to gold, pursued by the alchemists. — transmutationist, n. — transmutative, adj.

Change

 the order in which a peal of bells can be rung, hence, the collective sound of the bells; Mathematics. a permutation for a different order in which a set or series of things can be changed.
Examples: change or peal of bells; a change of clothing [modern].

Change

 

See Also: ENTRANCES/EXITS, PERMANENCE

  1. Anticipate change as though you had left it behind you —Rainer Maria Rilke
  2. Any essential reform must, like charity, begin at home —John Macy

    See Also: BELIEFS, CRITICISM, PEACE, SENSE

  3. Changeable as a baby’s diaper —Anon
  4. Changeable as the weather —American colloquialism, attributed to New England

    The variations this has sprouted typify the simple simile’s extension through more particularization. Some examples: “Changeable/unpredictable as April weather or as the sky in April” and “Changeable like Midwestern weather —violent and highly volatile.”

  5. (Her expression would) change as quickly as a sky with clouds racing across the moon —Madeleine L’Engle
  6. (Hopes) changed daily like the stock market —Margaret Millar

    In her novel, The Murder of Miranda Millar, expands the simile as follows: “Gaining a few points here, losing a few there.”

  7. Changed his mind regularly, like shirts —Anon
  8. Changed … like the shift of key in a musical score —Lawrence Durrell
  9. Changed moods like a strobe of shifting lights —Alvin Boretz
  10. Changeful as a creature of the tropical sea lying under a reef —Saul Bellow
  11. A change, like a shift of wind, overcame the judge —Truman Capote
  12. Change of attitude … like a fish gliding with a flick of its tail, now here, now there —Jean Rhys
  13. (Life) changed like fluffy clouds —Rita Mae Brown
  14. Changes … as breath-taking as a Celtics fast break —Larry McCoy, Wall Street Journal article about changes at CBS network, December 4, 1986
  15. Changes his mood like a wizard —Joan Chase
  16. Ever changing, like a joyless eye that finds no objects worth its constancy —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  17. Everything changed … like the rug, the one that gets pulled —Alberto Alvaor Rios
  18. Fickle as the sunlight —William Alfred
  19. Fickle as the wind —Horace
  20. Get used to [changes] … like listening to your own heart —Marguerite Duras
  21. In our changes we should move like a caterpillar, part of which is stationary in every advance, not like the toad —James A. Pike

    Reverend Pike’s advice was aimed at preventing anxiety.

  22. [Moving from slow to fast-paced life] it was like stepping from a gondola to an ocean steamer —Edith Wharton
  23. [Personality of a character] metamorphoses … like a butterfly bursting out of a cocoon —Frank Rich, New York Times, January 21, 1986
  24. Mood … swinging like an erratic pendulum from being hurt to hurting —Ross Macdonald
  25. Most reformers, like a pair of trousers on a windy clothesline, go through a vast deal of vehement motion but stay in the same place —Austin O’Malley
  26. Popped out and disappeared like a heat rash —George Garrett
  27. Sailing through change as effortlessly as gulls —Gail Godwin
  28. (And all the shapes of this grand scenery) shifted like restless clouds before the steadfast sun —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  29. (Streets) shift like dunes —Lisa Ress
  30. The switch is like going from Star Wars to stagecoaches —David “Doc” Livingston, commenting on enforced job switch (from controlling air traffic to controlling commuter trains), as quoted in New York Times article about fired air controllers by N. R. Kleinfield, September 28, 1986
  31. Up and down like mercury —May Sarton
  32. (Moods may) veer as erratically as the wind —Milton R. Sapirstein

change


Past participle: changed
Gerund: changing

Imperative
change
change
Present
I change
you change
he/she/it changes
we change
you change
they change
Preterite
I changed
you changed
he/she/it changed
we changed
you changed
they changed
Present Continuous
I am changing
you are changing
he/she/it is changing
we are changing
you are changing
they are changing
Present Perfect
I have changed
you have changed
he/she/it has changed
we have changed
you have changed
they have changed
Past Continuous
I was changing
you were changing
he/she/it was changing
we were changing
you were changing
they were changing
Past Perfect
I had changed
you had changed
he/she/it had changed
we had changed
you had changed
they had changed
Future
I will change
you will change
he/she/it will change
we will change
you will change
they will change
Future Perfect
I will have changed
you will have changed
he/she/it will have changed
we will have changed
you will have changed
they will have changed
Future Continuous
I will be changing
you will be changing
he/she/it will be changing
we will be changing
you will be changing
they will be changing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been changing
you have been changing
he/she/it has been changing
we have been changing
you have been changing
they have been changing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been changing
you will have been changing
he/she/it will have been changing
we will have been changing
you will have been changing
they will have been changing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been changing
you had been changing
he/she/it had been changing
we had been changing
you had been changing
they had been changing
Conditional
I would change
you would change
he/she/it would change
we would change
you would change
they would change
Past Conditional
I would have changed
you would have changed
he/she/it would have changed
we would have changed
you would have changed
they would have changed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.change - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to anotherchange - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
acceleration - an increase in rate of change; "modern science caused an acceleration of cultural change"
deceleration, retardation, slowing - a decrease in rate of change; "the deceleration of the arms race"
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
avulsion - an abrupt change in the course of a stream that forms the boundary between two parcels of land resulting in the loss of part of the land of one landowner and a consequent increase in the land of another
break - an abrupt change in the tone or register of the voice (as at puberty or due to emotion); "then there was a break in her voice"
mutation - a change or alteration in form or qualities
sublimation - (psychology) modifying the natural expression of an impulse or instinct (especially a sexual one) to one that is socially acceptable
surprise - a sudden unexpected event
nascence, nascency, nativity, birth - the event of being born; "they celebrated the birth of their first child"
breakup, separation, detachment - coming apart
vagary - an unexpected and inexplicable change in something (in a situation or a person's behavior, etc.); "the vagaries of the weather"; "his wealth fluctuates with the vagaries of the stock market"; "he has dealt with human vagaries for many years"
variation, fluctuation - an instance of change; the rate or magnitude of change
conversion - a change of religion; "his conversion to the Catholic faith"
death, decease, expiry - the event of dying or departure from life; "her death came as a terrible shock"; "upon your decease the capital will pass to your grandchildren"
decrease, lessening, drop-off - a change downward; "there was a decrease in his temperature as the fever subsided"; "there was a sharp drop-off in sales"
destabilization - an event that causes a loss of equilibrium (as of a ship or aircraft)
increase - a change resulting in an increase; "the increase is scheduled for next month"
easing, moderation, relief - a change for the better
deformation - alteration in the shape or dimensions of an object as a result of the application of stress to it
transition - a change from one place or state or subject or stage to another
transformation, transmutation, shift - a qualitative change
sparkling, twinkle, scintillation - a rapid change in brightness; a brief spark or flash
shimmer, play - a weak and tremulous light; "the shimmer of colors on iridescent feathers"; "the play of light on the water"
transmutation - (physics) the change of one chemical element into another (as by nuclear decay or radioactive bombardment); "the transmutation of base metals into gold proved to be impossible"
damage, impairment, harm - the occurrence of a change for the worse
development - a recent event that has some relevance for the present situation; "recent developments in Iraq"; "what a revolting development!"
revolution - a drastic and far-reaching change in ways of thinking and behaving; "the industrial revolution was also a cultural revolution"
chromosomal mutation, genetic mutation, mutation - (genetics) any event that changes genetic structure; any alteration in the inherited nucleic acid sequence of the genotype of an organism
sex change - a change in a person's physical sexual characteristics (as by surgery and hormone treatments)
loss of consciousness - the occurrence of a loss of the ability to perceive and respond
2.change - a relational difference between states; especially between states before and after some event; "he attributed the change to their marriage"
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
difference - a significant change; "the difference in her is amazing"; "his support made a real difference"
gradient - a graded change in the magnitude of some physical quantity or dimension
3.change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
entail - the act of entailing property; the creation of a fee tail from a fee simple
policy change, volte-face, about-face, reversal - a major change in attitude or principle or point of view; "an about-face on foreign policy"
adulteration - the act of adulterating (especially the illicit substitution of one substance for another)
move, relocation - the act of changing your residence or place of business; "they say that three moves equal one fire"
downshift - a change to a lower gear in a car or bicycle
downshift - a change from a financially rewarding but stressful career to a less well paid but more fulfilling one
filtration - the act of changing a fluid by passing it through a filter
reduction, simplification - the act of reducing complexity
decimalisation, decimalization - the act of changing to a decimal system; "the decimalization of British currency"
metrication, metrification - the act of changing from imperial units of measurement to metric units: meters, grams, seconds
variation - the act of changing or altering something slightly but noticeably from the norm or standard; "who is responsible for these variations in taxation?"
turning - act of changing in practice or custom; "the law took many turnings over the years"
diversification, variegation - the act of introducing variety (especially in investments or in the variety of goods and services offered); "my broker recommended a greater diversification of my investments"; "he limited his losses by diversification of his product line"
flux - in constant change; "his opinions are in flux"; "the newness and flux of the computer industry"
switching, shift, switch - the act of changing one thing or position for another; "his switch on abortion cost him the election"
substitution, commutation, exchange - the act of putting one thing or person in the place of another: "he sent Smith in for Jones but the substitution came too late to help"
promotion - act of raising in rank or position
demotion - act of lowering in rank or position
change of state - the act of changing something into something different in essential characteristics
modification, adjustment, alteration - the act of making something different (as e.g. the size of a garment)
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
movement - the act of changing the location of something; "the movement of cargo onto the vessel"
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
change of direction, reorientation - the act of changing the direction in which something is oriented
change of magnitude - the act of changing the amount or size of something
change of integrity - the act of changing the unity or wholeness of something
conversion - the act of changing from one use or function or purpose to another
updating - the act of changing something to bring it up to date (usually by adding something); "criminal records need regular updating"
change of shape - an action that changes the shape of something
satisfaction - act of fulfilling a desire or need or appetite; "the satisfaction of their demand for better services"
nationalisation, nationalization - the action of rendering national in character
communisation, communization - a change from private property to public property owned by the community
secularisation, secularization - the activity of changing something (art or education or society or morality etc.) so it is no longer under the control or influence of religion
rollover - the act of changing the institution that invests your pension plan without incurring a tax penalty
4.change - the result of alteration or modification; "there were marked changes in the lining of the lungs"; "there had been no change in the mountains"
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
depolarisation, depolarization - a loss of polarity or polarization
5.change - the balance of money received when the amount you tender is greater than the amount due; "I paid with a twenty and pocketed the change"
cash, hard cash, hard currency - money in the form of bills or coins; "there is a desperate shortage of hard cash"
6.change - a thing that is different; "he inspected several changes before selecting one"
thing - an entity that is not named specifically; "I couldn't tell what the thing was"
7.change - a different or fresh set of clothes; "she brought a change in her overnight bag"
article of clothing, clothing, habiliment, wearable, vesture, wear - a covering designed to be worn on a person's body
8.change - coins of small denomination regarded collectively; "he had a pocketful of change"
coin - a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as money
9.change - money received in return for its equivalent in a larger denomination or a different currency; "he got change for a twenty and used it to pay the taxi driver"
cash, hard cash, hard currency - money in the form of bills or coins; "there is a desperate shortage of hard cash"
10.change - a difference that is usually pleasantchange - a difference that is usually pleasant; "he goes to France for variety"; "it is a refreshing change to meet a woman mechanic"
difference - the quality of being unlike or dissimilar; "there are many differences between jazz and rock"
Verb1.change - cause to changechange - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
awaken, wake up, waken, rouse, wake, arouse - cause to become awake or conscious; "He was roused by the drunken men in the street"; "Please wake me at 6 AM."
cause to sleep - make fall asleep; "The soft music caused us to fall asleep"
affect - act physically on; have an effect upon; "the medicine affects my heart rate"
refreshen, freshen, refresh - make fresh again
fecundate, inseminate, fertilise, fertilize - introduce semen into (a female)
indispose - cause to feel unwell; "She was indisposed"
cry - bring into a particular state by crying; "The little boy cried himself to sleep"
etiolate - make pale or sickly; "alcohol etiolates your skin"
shade - vary slightly; "shade the meaning"
animalise, animalize, brutalise, brutalize - make brutal, unfeeling, or inhuman; "Life in the camps had brutalized him"
convert - change the nature, purpose, or function of something; "convert lead into gold"; "convert hotels into jails"; "convert slaves to laborers"
opalise, opalize - make opalescent
arterialise, arterialize - change venous blood into arterial blood
make, get - give certain properties to something; "get someone mad"; "She made us look silly"; "He made a fool of himself at the meeting"; "Don't make this into a big deal"; "This invention will make you a millionaire"; "Make yourself clear"
counterchange, interchange, transpose - cause to change places; "interchange this screw for one of a smaller size"
vascularise, vascularize - make vascular; "the yolk sac is gradually vascularized"
decrepitate - to roast or calcine so as to cause to crackle or until crackling stops; "decrepitate salts"
suburbanise, suburbanize - make suburban in character; "highly suburbanized cities"
revolutionize, revolutionise, overturn - change radically; "E-mail revolutionized communication in academe"
etiolate - bleach and alter the natural development of (a green plant) by excluding sunlight
barbarise, barbarize - make crude or savage in behavior or speech; "his years in prison have barbarized the young man"
alkalinise, alkalinize - make (a substance) alkaline; "The oxide is alkalized"
mythicise, mythicize, mythologise, mythologize - make into a myth; "The Europeans have mythicized Rte. 66"
allegorise, allegorize - make into an allegory; "The story was allegorized over time"
demythologise, demythologize - remove the mythical element from (writings); "the Bible should be demythologized and examined for its historical value"
land, bring - bring into a different state; "this may land you in jail"
coarsen - make less subtle or refined; "coarsen one's ideals"
affect, bear upon, impact, bear on, touch on, touch - have an effect upon; "Will the new rules affect me?"
alchemise, alchemize - alter (elements) by alchemy
alcoholise, alcoholize - make alcoholic, as by fermenting; "alcoholize prunes"
shape, form - give shape or form to; "shape the dough"; "form the young child's character"
round down, round off, round out, round - express as a round number; "round off the amount"
suspend - cause to be held in suspension in a fluid; "suspend the particles"
sober - cause to become sober; "A sobering thought"
reconstruct - cause somebody to adapt or reform socially or politically
increase - make bigger or more; "The boss finally increased her salary"; "The university increased the number of students it admitted"
ease off, let up, ease up - reduce pressure or intensity; "he eased off the gas pedal and the car slowed down"
assimilate - make similar; "This country assimilates immigrants very quickly"
dissimilate - make dissimilar; cause to become less similar
commute, exchange, convert - exchange a penalty for a less severe one
vitalise, vitalize - give life to; "The eggs are vitalized"
clear, unclutter - rid of obstructions; "Clear your desk"
activate - make active or more active; "activate an old file"
activate - make (substances) radioactive
aerate, activate - aerate (sewage) so as to favor the growth of organisms that decompose organic matter
2.change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
refreshen, freshen, freshen up, refresh - become or make oneself fresh again; "She freshened up after the tennis game"
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
acquire, develop, produce, grow, get - come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); "He grew a beard"; "The patient developed abdominal pains"; "I got funny spots all over my body"; "Well-developed breasts"
regenerate - undergo regeneration
shade - pass from one quality such as color to another by a slight degree; "the butterfly wings shade to yellow"
gel - become a gel; "The solid, when heated, gelled"
animalise, animalize, brutalise, brutalize - become brutal or insensitive and unfeeling
convert - change in nature, purpose, or function; undergo a chemical change; "The substance converts to an acid"
creolize - develop into a creole; "pidgins often creolize"
mutate - undergo mutation; "cells mutate"
experience, have - undergo; "The stocks had a fast run-up"
decrepitate - undergo decrepitation and crackle; "The salt decrepitated"
suburbanise, suburbanize - take on suburban character; "the city suburbanized"
roll up, roll - show certain properties when being rolled; "The carpet rolls unevenly"; "dried-out tobacco rolls badly"
glass over, glaze, glaze over, glass - become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance; "Her eyes glaze over when she is bored"
grow, turn - pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become; "The weather turned nasty"; "She grew angry"
barbarise, barbarize - become crude or savage or barbaric in behavior or language
alkalinise, alkalinize - become alkaline
change by reversal, reverse, turn - change to the contrary; "The trend was reversed"; "the tides turned against him"; "public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
change form, change shape, deform - assume a different shape or form
form - assume a form or shape; "the water formed little beads"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
adapt, conform, adjust - adapt or conform oneself to new or different conditions; "We must adjust to the bad economic situation"
climb up, jump, rise - rise in rank or status; "Her new novel jumped high on the bestseller list"
assimilate - become similar in sound; "The nasal assimilates to the following consonant"
dissimilate - become dissimilar or less similar; "These two related tribes of people gradually dissimilated over time"
dissimilate - become dissimilar by changing the sound qualities; "These consonants dissimilate"
change magnitude - change in size or magnitude
modify - make less severe or harsh or extreme; "please modify this letter to make it more polite"; "he modified his views on same-gender marriage"
deaden - become lifeless, less lively, intense, or active; lose life, force, or vigor
break - be broken in; "If the new teacher won't break, we'll add some stress"
decay, dilapidate, crumble - fall into decay or ruin; "The unoccupied house started to decay"
mildew, mold - become moldy; spoil due to humidity; "The furniture molded in the old house"
hydrate - become hydrated and combine with water
dry out, dry - become dry or drier; "The laundry dries in the sun"
strengthen - gain strength; "His body strengthened"
distill, distil - undergo the process of distillation
deoxidise, deoxidize, reduce - to remove oxygen from a compound, or cause to react with hydrogen or form a hydride, or to undergo an increase in the number of electrons
crack - break into simpler molecules by means of heat; "The petroleum cracked"
oxidise, oxidize, oxidate - add oxygen to or combine with oxygen
oxidate, oxidize, oxidise - enter into a combination with oxygen or become converted into an oxide; "This metal oxidizes easily"
grow - become attached by or as if by the process of growth; "The tree trunks had grown together"
mellow out, mellow, melt - become more relaxed, easygoing, or genial; "With age, he mellowed"
remain, stay, rest - stay the same; remain in a certain state; "The dress remained wet after repeated attempts to dry it"; "rest assured"; "stay alone"; "He remained unmoved by her tears"; "The bad weather continued for another week"
3.change - become different in some particular way, without permanently losing one's or its former characteristics or essence; "her mood changes in accordance with the weather"; "The supermarket's selection of vegetables varies according to the season"
alternate, jump - go back and forth; swing back and forth between two states or conditions
crackle - to become, or to cause to become, covered with a network of small cracks; "The blazing sun crackled the desert sand"
modulate - vary the frequency, amplitude, phase, or other characteristic of (electromagnetic waves)
avianise, avianize - to modify microorganisms by repeated culture in the developing chick embryo
move - go or proceed from one point to another; "the debate moved from family values to the economy"
adapt, accommodate - make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose; "Adapt our native cuisine to the available food resources of the new country"
widen, let out - make (clothes) larger; "Let out that dress--I gained a lot of weight"
take in - make (clothes) smaller; "Please take in this skirt--I've lost weight"
branch out, broaden, diversify - vary in order to spread risk or to expand; "The company diversified"
diversify, radiate - spread into new habitats and produce variety or variegate; "The plants on this island diversified"
specialize, narrow down, narrow, specialise - become more focus on an area of activity or field of study; "She specializes in Near Eastern history"
honeycomb - make full of cavities, like a honeycomb
break - vary or interrupt a uniformity or continuity; "The flat plain was broken by tall mesas"
4.change - lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; "switch to a different brand of beer"; "She switched psychiatrists"; "The car changed lanes"
exchange, convert, commute, change - exchange or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category; "Could you convert my dollars into pounds?"; "He changed his name"; "convert centimeters into inches"; "convert holdings into shares"
change - change clothes; put on different clothes; "Change before you go to the opera"
transition - make or undergo a transition (from one state or system to another); "The airline transitioned to more fuel-efficient jets"; "The adagio transitioned into an allegro"
shift - change gears; "you have to shift when you go down a steep hill"
break - change suddenly from one tone quality or register to another; "Her voice broke to a whisper when she started to talk about her children"
channel-surf, surf - switch channels, on television
leap, jump - pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion"; "jump from one thing to another"
diphthongise, diphthongize - change from a simple vowel to a diphthong; "This vowel diphthongized in Germanic"
cut - make an abrupt change of image or sound; "cut from one scene to another"
break - change directions suddenly
5.change - change clothes; put on different clothes; "Change before you go to the opera"
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
switch, change, shift - lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; "switch to a different brand of beer"; "She switched psychiatrists"; "The car changed lanes"
6.change - exchange or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category; "Could you convert my dollars into pounds?"; "He changed his name"; "convert centimeters into inches"; "convert holdings into shares"
rectify - convert into direct current; "rectify alternating current"
utilize - convert (from an investment trust to a unit trust)
capitalise, capitalize - convert (a company's reserve funds) into capital
replace - substitute a person or thing for (another that is broken or inefficient or lost or no longer working or yielding what is expected); "He replaced the old razor blade"; "We need to replace the secretary that left a month ago"; "the insurance will replace the lost income"; "This antique vase can never be replaced"
launder - convert illegally obtained funds into legal ones
switch, change, shift - lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; "switch to a different brand of beer"; "She switched psychiatrists"; "The car changed lanes"
break - exchange for smaller units of money; "I had to break a $100 bill just to buy the candy"
7.change - give to, and receive from, one another; "Would you change places with me?"; "We have been exchanging letters for a year"
transfer - cause to change ownership; "I transferred my stock holdings to my children"
sell - exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent; "He sold his house in January"; "She sells her body to survive and support her drug habit"
cash, cash in - exchange for cash; "I cashed the check as soon as it arrived in the mail"
ransom, redeem - exchange or buy back for money; under threat
redeem - to turn in (vouchers or coupons) and receive something in exchange
stand in, sub, substitute, fill in - be a substitute; "The young teacher had to substitute for the sick colleague"; "The skim milk substitutes for cream--we are on a strict diet"
swap, swop, switch, trade - exchange or give (something) in exchange for
barter - exchange goods without involving money
trade in, trade - turn in as payment or part payment for a purchase; "trade in an old car for a new one"
8.change - change from one vehicle or transportation line to anotherchange - change from one vehicle or transportation line to another; "She changed in Chicago on her way to the East coast"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
9.change - become deeper in tone; "His voice began to change when he was 12 years old"; "Her voice deepened when she whispered the password"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
10.change - remove or replace the coverings of; "Father had to learn how to change the baby"; "After each guest we changed the bed linens"
replace - substitute a person or thing for (another that is broken or inefficient or lost or no longer working or yielding what is expected); "He replaced the old razor blade"; "We need to replace the secretary that left a month ago"; "the insurance will replace the lost income"; "This antique vase can never be replaced"

change

noun
2. variety, break (informal), departure, variation, novelty, diversion, whole new ball game (informal) It makes a nice change to see you in a good mood for once.
variety stability, uniformity, permanence, monotony, constancy, invariability
3. exchange, trade, conversion, swap, substitution, interchange He stuffed a bag with a few changes of clothing.
4. coins, money, small change, loose change, wonga (slang) Do you have any change for the phone?
verb
1. alter, reform, transform, adjust, moderate, revise, modify, remodel, reorganize, restyle, convert They should change the law to make it illegal to own replica weapons.
alter keep, hold
2. shift, vary, transform, alter, modify, diversify, fluctuate, mutate, metamorphose, transmute We are trying to detect and understand how the climate changes.
shift remain, stay
3. exchange, trade, replace, substitute, swap, interchange Can we change it for another if it doesn't work properly?
Quotations
"A state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation" [Edmund Burke Reflections on the Revolution in France]
"Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots?" Bible: Jeremiah
"The more things change, the more they are the same" [Alphonse Karr Les Guêpes]
"Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better" [Dr. Johnson Dictionary of the English Language]
"The old order changeth, yielding place to new" [Alfred, Lord Tennyson The Passing of Arthur]
"Philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; the point, however, is to change it" [Karl Marx Theses on Feuerbach]
"When it is not necessary to change, it is necessary not to change" [Lucius Cary Discourses of Infallibility]
Proverbs
"Don't change horses in midstream"
"A change is as good as a rest"
"A new broom sweeps clean"
Usage: Climatic is sometimes wrongly used where climactic is meant. Climatic should be used to talk about things relating to climate; climactic is used to describe something which forms a climax: the climactic moment of the Revolution.

change

verb
1. To make or become different:
2. To give up in return for something else:
Informal: swap.
3. To leave or discard for another:
noun
1. The process or result of making or becoming different:
2. The act of exchanging or substituting:
Informal: swap.
3. The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
4. The process or an instance of passing from one form, state, or stage to another:
Translations
اسْتِراحَه، عُطْلَهالبَاقيتَبْديل، تَغْييرتغييرتَغْيير
drobnézměnazměnitnazpětpřevléci se
ændrebyttepengeforandringforvandleskifte
ŝanĝiŝanĝo
muutosmuuttaamuuttuavaihtaavaihtoraha
promjenasitnišpresvući sepromijeniti
átöltözikátváltozikvisszajáró pénz
gantitukarubah
afgangur, skiptimyntbreytabreyta íbreytinghvíld; tilbreyting
変える変わる変化おつり
...을 바꾸다거스름돈(...으로) 변하다변화
cambiare
aplinkos pakeitimasapsigalvotidėl įvairumodėmesio sumažėjimasgrąža
apmainītapstākļu maiņaatlikumsizdotā naudaizmaiņas
modificareschimbschimbare
prezliecť sa
drobižspremembaspremenitizamenjatiostanek denarja
promenazamena
ändraförändringväxeländrasbyta
เงินทอนเปลี่ยน แลกเปลี่ยน แลกเปลี่ยนการเปลี่ยนแปลง
thay đổithay quần áotiền lẻ

change

[tʃeɪndʒ]
A. N
1. (gen) → cambio m; (= transformation) → transformación f; (= alteration) → modificación f; (= variation) → variación f; [of skin] → muda f
the day out made a refreshing changeel día fuera de casa nos dio un buen cambio de aire
to resist changeresistirse a las innovaciones
change of addresscambio m de domicilio
to have a change of aircambiar de aires
the change of air has done me goodel cambio de aires me ha sentado bien
a change for the betterun cambio para bien
a change of clothesropa para cambiarse; (= underclothes) → una muda
just for a changepara variar
change of heartcambio m de idea
he's had a change of heartha cambiado de idea
change of horsesrelevo m de los tiros
a change in policyun cambio de política
the change of life (Med) → la menopausia
change of ownershipcambio m de dueño
change of scenecambio m de aires
a change for the worseun cambio para mal
to get no change out of sbno conseguir sacar nada a algn
a change is as good as a restun cambio de aires da fuerzas para seguir
see also ring 2 B1
2. (= small coins) → cambio m, suelto m, sencillo m, feria f (Mex) ; (for a larger coin) → cambio m; (= money returned) → vuelta f, vuelto m (LAm)
can you give me change for one pound?¿tiene cambio de una libra?, ¿puede cambiarme una moneda de una libra?
keep the changequédese con la vuelta
you won't get much change out of a pound if you buy sugarcon una libra no te va a sobrar mucho si compras azúcar
B. VT
1. (by substitution) [+ address, name etc] → cambiar; [+ clothes, colour] → cambiar de
to change trains/buses/planes (at)hacer transbordo (en), cambiar de tren/autobús/avión (en)
to change gear (Aut) → cambiar de marcha
to get changedcambiarse
to change handscambiar de mano or de dueño
he wants to change his jobquiere cambiar de trabajo
to change one's mindcambiar de opinión or idea
to change placescambiar de sitio
I'm going to change my shoesvoy a cambiarme de zapatos
let's change the subjectcambiemos de tema
2. (= exchange) (in shop) → cambiar (for por) can I change this dress for a larger size?¿puedo cambiar este vestido por otro de una talla mayor?
3. (= alter) [+ person] → cambiar (fig) → evolucionar; (= transform) → transformar (into en) I find him much changedle veo muy cambiado
the prince was changed into a frogel príncipe se transformó en rana
4. [+ money] → cambiar
to change pounds into dollarscambiar libras en dólares
can you change this note for me?¿me hace el favor de cambiar este billete?
5. (= put fresh nappy on) [+ baby] → cambiar (el pañal de)
C. VI
1. (= alter) → cambiar
you've changed!¡cómo has cambiado!, ¡pareces otro!
you haven't changed a bit!¡no has cambiado en lo más mínimo!
2. (= be transformed) → transformarse (into en)
3. (= change clothes) → cambiarse, mudarse
she changed into an old skirtse cambió y se puso una falda vieja
4. (= change trains) → hacer transbordo, cambiar de tren; (= change buses) → hacer transbordo, cambiar de autobús
all change!¡fin de trayecto!
D. CPD change machine Nmáquina f de cambio
change purse N (US) → monedero m
change around
A. VT + ADV (= rearrange) → cambiar de posición
B. VI + ADVcambiar
change down VI + ADV (Brit) (Aut) → cambiar a una velocidad inferior
change over
A. VI + ADV (from sth to sth) → cambiar (to a) [players etc] → cambiar(se)
B. VT + ADVcambiar
change round
see change around
change up VI + ADV (Brit) (Aut) → cambiar a una velocidad superior

change

[ˈtʃeɪndʒ]
vt
[+ money] → changer
I'd like to change £50 → Je voudrais changer cinquante livres.
(= alter) [+ character, life, world] → changer
to change one's mind → changer d'avis
I've changed my mind → J'ai changé d'avis.
(= switch, substitute) [+ one's name, one's job] → changer de; [+ shoes, clothes] → changer de; [+ gear] → changer de
I'm going to change my shoes → Je vais changer de chaussures.
to get changed (= change clothes) → se changer
I'm going to get changed → Je vais me changer.
to change a bulb → changer une ampoule
to change trains → changer de train
You have to change trains in Paris → Il faut changer de train à Paris.
to change a baby → changer un bébé
to change a baby's nappy → changer les couches d'un bébé
(= exchange) [+ purchase] → échanger
Can I change this sweater? It's too small → Est-ce que je peux échanger ce pull? Il est trop petit.
to change sth for sth → échanger qch contre qch
(= transform) to change sb/sth into → changer qch/qn en, transformer qch/qn en
to change hands (= be sold) → changer de mains
vi
(gen)changer
The town has changed a lot → La ville a beaucoup changé.
to change to sth [traffic lights] → passer à qch
(= change clothes) → se changer
She's changing to go out → Elle est en train de se changer pour sortir.
to change into sth [+ clothes] → se changer et mettre qch
She changed into an old skirt → Elle s'est changée et a mis une vieille jupe., Elle a mis une vieille jupe.
(= be transformed) to change into → se changer en, se transformer en
n
(gen)changement m
There's been a change of plan → Il y a eu un changement de programme.
a change of scene → un changement de décor
for a change → pour changer
Let's play tennis for a change → Si on jouait au tennis pour changer?
(= money) → monnaie f
I haven't got any change → Je n'ai pas de monnaie.
to give sb change for £10, to give sb change of £10 → faire à qn la monnaie de 10 livres
keep the change! → gardez la monnaie! small change
a change of clothes → des vêtements de rechange
a change of underwear → des sous-vêtements de rechange

change

n
(= alteration)Veränderung f; (= modification also)Änderung f (→ to +gen); a change for the betterein Fortschritt m, → eine Verbesserung; a change for the worseein Rückschritt m, → eine Verschlechterung; change of addressAdressen- or Anschriftenänderung f; a change in the weathereine Wetterveränderung; a change of aireine Luftveränderung; a change is as good as a rest (prov) → Abwechslung wirkt or tut Wunder; no changeunverändert; I need a change of sceneich brauche Tapetenwechsel; to make changes (to something) (→ an etw dat) → (Ver)änderungen plvornehmen; to make a change/a major change in somethingetw ändern/bedeutend verändern; save changes (Comput) → Änderungen speichern; the change of lifedie Wechseljahre; he needs a change of clotheser müsste sich mal wieder umziehen; I didn’t have a change of clothes with meich hatte nichts zum Wechseln mit; a change of jobein Stellenwechsel m
(= variety)Abwechslung f; (just) for a changezur Abwechslung (mal); that makes a changedas ist mal was anderes; (iro)das ist ja was ganz Neues!; it’ll make a nice changedas wäre eine nette Abwechslung ? ring
no pl (= changing)Veränderung f; those who are against changediejenigen, die gegen jegliche Veränderung sind; the constant change will only confuse peopleder ständige Wechsel verwirrt die Leute nur
(of one thing for another)Wechsel m; change of careerBerufswechsel m; a change of governmentein Regierungswechsel m, → ein Wechsel min der Regierung; a wheel changeein Radwechsel m
no pl (= money)Wechselgeld nt; (= small change)Kleingeld nt; can you give me change for a pound?können Sie mir ein Pfund wechseln?; I haven’t got any changeich habe kein Kleingeld; I haven’t got change for £5ich kann auf £ 5 nicht rausgeben or £ 5 nicht wechseln; you won’t get much change out of £5von £ 5 wird wohl nicht viel übrig bleiben; keep the changeder Rest ist für Sie; you won’t get much change out of him (fig)aus ihm wirst du nicht viel rauskriegen
(St Ex) ChangeBörse f
vt
(by substitution) → wechseln; address, nameändern; to change trains/buses etcumsteigen; to change one’s clothessich umziehen; to change a wheel/the oileinen Rad-/Ölwechsel vornehmen, ein Rad/das Öl wechseln; to change a baby’s nappy (Brit) or diaper (US), to change a baby(bei einem Baby) die Windeln wechseln, ein Baby wickeln; to change the sheets or the beddie Bettwäsche wechseln, das Bett neu beziehen; to change one’s seatden Platz wechseln, sich woanders hinsetzen; to change handsden Besitzer wechseln; would you change the record? (lit, fig)kannst du (mal) eine andere Platte auflegen?; to change places with somebodymit jdm den Platz tauschen; she changed places with him/Mrs Browner/Frau Brown und sie tauschten die Plätze; I wouldn’t change places with him for the worldich möchte or würde um nichts in der Welt mit ihm tauschen
(= alter)(ver)ändern; person, ideasändern; (= transform)verwandeln; to change somebody/something into somethingjdn/etw in etw (acc)verwandeln; you won’t be able to change herdu kannst sie nicht ändern; a chameleon can change its colourdas Chamäleon kann seine Farbe wechseln
(= exchange: in shop etc) → umtauschen; she changed the dress for one of a different coloursie tauschte das Kleid gegen ein andersfarbiges um; he changed his Rolls Royce for a Jaguarer vertauschte seinen Rolls Royce mit einem Mini ? guard
money (into smaller money) → wechseln; (into other currency) → (ein)wechseln, (um)tauschen
(Brit Aut) to change gearschalten
vi
(= alter)sich ändern; (town, person also)sich verändern; you’ve changed!du hast dich aber verändert!; he will never changeer wird sich nie ändern, der ändert sich nie!; to change from something into …sich aus etw in … (acc)verwandeln
(= change clothes)sich umziehen; she changed into an old skirtsie zog sich einen alten Rock an; I’ll just change out of these old clothesich muss mir noch die alten Sachen ausziehen
(= change trains etc)umsteigen; you change at Yorkin York müssen Sie umsteigen; all change!Endstation!, alle aussteigen!
(Brit Aut: = change gear) → schalten; (traffic lights)umspringen (→ to auf +acc)
(from one thing to another) (seasons)wechseln; to change to a different systemauf ein anderes System umstellen, zu einem anderen System übergehen; I changed to philosophy from chemistryich habe von Chemie zu Philosophie gewechselt; do you want to change with me? (places) → möchten Sie mit mir tauschen?

change

[tʃeɪndʒ]
1. n
a.cambiamento
a change for the better/worse → un miglioramento/peggioramento, un mutamento per il meglio/peggio
just for a change → tanto per cambiare
he likes a change → gli piace cambiare
change of address → cambiamento di indirizzo
a change of clothes → un cambio (di vestiti)
to have a change of heart → cambiare idea
to have a change of scene → cambiare aria
there's been a change in the weather → il tempo è cambiato
b. (small coins) → moneta, spiccioli mpl; (money returned) → resto
small or loose change → spiccioli mpl
can you give me change for £1? → mi può cambiare una sterlina?
you don't get much change out of £5 → non avanza molto da 5 sterline
keep the change → tenga il resto
2. vt
a. (by substitution) → cambiare
to change hands → cambiare padrone, passare di mano
a sum of money changed hands → c'è stato un movimento di denaro
to change gear (Aut) → cambiare (marcia)
to change places (two people) → scambiarsi di posto
I changed places with him → ho scambiato il mio posto con il suo
to change trains/buses (at) → cambiare treno/autobus (a)
to change the rein (Horse-riding) → cambiare di mano
to change sides (Pol) → cambiare bandiera
let's change the subject → cambiamo argomento
b. (exchange, in shop) → cambiare
to change ends (Tennis, Ftbl) → effettuare il cambio di campo
c. (alter, person, idea) → cambiare; (transform, person) → trasformare; (thing) → tramutare
to change one's mind → cambiare idea
d. (money) → cambiare
3. vi
a. (alter) → cambiare, mutare
you've changed! → come sei cambiato!
b. (change clothes) → cambiarsi
c. (Rail) → cambiare
all change! → si cambia!
change down vi + adv (Aut) → scalare (la marcia)
change into
1. vi + prep
a. (become) → trasformarsi in
b. (different clothes) she changed into an old skirtsi è cambiata e ha messo una vecchia gonna
2. vt + prep to change sb/sth intotrasformare qn/qc in
change over vi + adv (make complete change) to change over from sth to sthpassare da qc a qc; (players) → scambiarsi (di posto o di campo)
change up vi + adv (Aut) → cambiare, mettere una marcia superiore

change

(tʃeindʒ) verb
1. to make or become different. They have changed the time of the train; He has changed since I saw him last.
2. to give or leave (one thing etc for another). She changed my library books for me.
3. (sometimes with into) to remove (clothes etc) and replace them by clean or different ones. I'm just going to change (my shirt); I'll change into an old pair of trousers.
4. (with into) to make into or become (something different). The prince was changed into a frog.
5. to give or receive (one kind of money for another). Could you change this bank-note for cash?
noun
1. the process of becoming or making different. The town is undergoing change.
2. an instance of this. a change in the programme.
3. a substitution of one thing for another. a change of clothes.
4. coins rather than paper money. I'll have to give you a note – I have no change.
5. money left over or given back from the amount given in payment. He paid with a dollar and got 20 cents change.
6. a holiday, rest etc. He has been ill – the change will do him good.
ˈchangeable adjective
changing often; liable to change often. changeable moods.
change hands
to pass into different ownership. This car has changed hands three times.
a change of heart
a change in attitude.
the change of life
the menopause.
change one's mind
to alter one's intention or opinion (about something). He was going to go to France but he changed his mind.
for a change
to be different; for variety. We're tired of the car, so we'll walk for a change.

change

البَاقي, تغيير, يَتَغَيَّرُ, يُغَيِّرُ drobné, převléci se, změna, změnit (se) ændre (sig), byttepenge, forandre, forandring ändern (sich), Änderung, Wechselgeld, wechseln αλλαγή, αλλάζω, συνάλλαγμα cambiar, cambiarse, cambio, convertir, vuelta muutos, muuttaa, muuttua, vaihtoraha changement, changer, monnaie presvući se, promijeniti, promjena, sitniš cambiamento, cambiare, cambiarsi, resto おつり, 変える, 変わる, 変化 ...을 바꾸다, 거스름돈, (...으로) 변하다, 변화 omkleden, veranderen, verandering, wisselgeld endring, forandre, veksel reszta, zmiana, zmienić, zmienić się mudança, mudar-se, trocar, troco изменение, меняться, переодевать, сдача ändra, byta om, förändring, växel เงินทอน, เปลี่ยน แลก, เปลี่ยน แลกเปลี่ยน, การเปลี่ยนแปลง bozuk para, değişiklik, değişmek, değiştirmek thay đổi, thay quần áo, tiền lẻ 变化, 改变, 零钱

change

n. cambio, alteración;
___ of lifemenopausia;
vt. cambiar, mudar.

change

n cambio; bandage — cambio de vendaje; — of life (ant) menopausia; sex — (fam) reasignación f de sexo or género, cambio de sexo (fam); vt, vi cambiar
References in classic literature ?
I only meant to change the little bottle for a big one, and I gave all my money to get it, and I'm truly trying not to be selfish any more.
The servant takes Hugo aside to tell him something, and Hagar changes the cups for two others which are harmless.
First there was an uneasy desire for change, for some big defi- nite movement to her life.
exclaimed Tom, and there was such a change in his manner that his friends could not help noticing it.
he added, while Ned and the others wondered at the sudden change in their friend's manner.
This change came about from an adventure we had together.
She must feel very lonely without her son," said Edna, desiring to change the subject.
An S corporation seeking automatic approval to change its accounting period should follow Rev.
These times have produced rapid change and complexity (Modis, 2003) and have resulted in an environment of unpredictability (Homer-Dixon, 2001).
We know that many factors caused climate change in the past.
In his remarks, Hawley admitted that the changes to the prohibited items list might attract the most attention, but considered this change less important than the fact that the TSA was focusing on higher threat areas like explosives.
Ideological efforts to control change may have influenced the functions family life, but "Westernization" and industrialization continued to define and shape the forces of culture including the way families are defined and how they interact with other societal structures.