changing


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change

 (chānj)
v. changed, chang·ing, chang·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be different: change the spelling of a word.
b. To give a completely different form or appearance to; transform: changed the yard into a garden.
2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: change places.
3. To exchange for or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category: change one's name; a light that changes colors.
4.
a. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides.
b. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes.
5. To give or receive the equivalent of (money) in lower denominations or in foreign currency.
6. To put a fresh covering on: change a bed; change the baby.
v.intr.
1. To become different or undergo alteration: He changed as he matured.
2. To undergo transformation or transition: The music changed to a slow waltz.
3. To go from one phase to another, as the moon or the seasons.
4. To make an exchange: If you prefer this seat, I'll change with you.
5. To transfer from one conveyance to another: She changed in Chicago on her way to the coast.
6. To put on other clothing: We changed for dinner.
7. To become deeper in tone: His voice began to change at age 13.
n.
1. The act, process, or result of altering or modifying: a change in facial expression.
2. The replacing of one thing for another; substitution: a change of atmosphere; a change of ownership.
3. A transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another: the change of seasons.
4. Something different; variety: ate early for a change.
5. A different or fresh set of clothing.
6.
a. Money of smaller denomination given or received in exchange for money of higher denomination.
b. The balance of money returned when an amount given is more than what is due.
c. Coins: had change jingling in his pocket.
7. Music
a. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
b. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
8. A market or exchange where business is transacted.
Phrasal Verb:
change off
1. To alternate with another person in performing a task.
2. To perform two tasks at once by alternating or a single task by alternate means.
Idioms:
change hands
To pass from one owner to another.
change (one's) mind
To reverse a previously held opinion or an earlier decision.
change (one's) tune
To alter one's approach or attitude.

[Middle English changen, from Norman French chaunger, from Latin cambiāre, cambīre, to exchange, probably of Celtic origin.]

changing

(ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ)
adj
not remaining the same; transient
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.changing - marked by continuous change or effective action
dynamic, dynamical - characterized by action or forcefulness or force of personality; "a dynamic market"; "a dynamic speaker"; "the dynamic president of the firm"
Translations

changing

[ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ]
A. ADJcambiante
a changing worldun mundo en perpetua evolución
B. N the changing of the Guardel cambio or relevo de la Guardia
C. CPD changing room N (Brit) → vestuario m

changing

[ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] adjchangeant(e)changing room n (British)
(in shop)cabine f d'essayage
(for sports players)vestiaire m

changing

adjsich verändernd, wechselnd; the fast-changing marketder sich schnell ändernde Markt
n the changing of the Guarddie Wachablösung

changing

[ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] adj (face, expression) → mutevole; (colours) → cangiante
References in classic literature ?
But changing her mind once more she resumed the peignoir, and went outside and sat down before her door.
For a single instant his searching and yet wary glance met the wondering look of the other, and then changing its direction, partly in cunning, and partly in disdain, it remained fixed, as if penetrating the distant air.
The necessity of changing hands at times with their burdens brought a corresponding change of cavalier at the lady's side, although it was observed that the younger Kearney, for the sake of continuing a conversation with Miss Jessie, kept his grasp of the handle nearest the young lady until his hand was nearly cut through, and his arm worn out by exhaustion.
Homeless as he had been,--continually changing his whereabout, and, therefore, responsible neither to public opinion nor to individuals,--putting off one exterior, and snatching up another, to be soon shifted for a third,--he had never violated the innermost man, but had carried his conscience along with him.
Many a church member saw I, walking behind the music, that has danced in the same measure with me, when Somebody was fiddler, and, it might be, an Indian powwow or a Lapland wizard changing hands with us
The horizon was of a fine golden tint, changing gradually into a pure apple green, and from that into the deep blue of the mid- heaven.
This ended, in prolonged solemn tones, like the continual tolling of a bell in a ship that is foundering at sea in a fog --in such tones he commenced reading the following hymn; but changing his manner towards the concluding stanzas, burst forth with a pealing exultation and joy -- The ribs and terrors in the whale, Arched over me a dismal gloom, While all God's sun-lit waves rolled by, And lift me deepening down to doom.
Vitus' dance in your arm, and if it does not wear you out it wears your horse out; you know you are always changing your horses; and why?
True, there was another life,--a life which, once believed in, stands as a solemn, significant figure before the otherwise unmeaning ciphers of time, changing them to orders of mysterious, untold value.
And you had to be always changing hands, and passing your spear over to the other foot, it got so irksome for one hand to hold it long at a time.
The great cloud-barred disk of the sun stood just above a limitless expanse of tossing white-caps--so to speak--a billowy chaos of massy mountain domes and peaks draped in imperishable snow, and flooded with an opaline glory of changing and dissolving splendors, while through rifts in a black cloud-bank above the sun, radiating lances of diamond dust shot to the zenith.
I heard the whoop again; it was behind me yet, but in a different place; it kept coming, and kept changing its place, and I kept answering, till by and by it was in front of me again, and I knowed the current had swung the canoe's head down-stream, and I was all right if that was Jim and not some other raftsman hollering.