changing


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change

 (chānj)
v. changed, chang·ing, chang·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to be different: change the spelling of a word.
b. To give a completely different form or appearance to; transform: changed the yard into a garden.
2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: change places.
3. To exchange for or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category: change one's name; a light that changes colors.
4.
a. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides.
b. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes.
5. To give or receive the equivalent of (money) in lower denominations or in foreign currency.
6. To put a fresh covering on: change a bed; change the baby.
v.intr.
1. To become different or undergo alteration: He changed as he matured.
2. To undergo transformation or transition: The music changed to a slow waltz.
3. To go from one phase to another, as the moon or the seasons.
4. To make an exchange: If you prefer this seat, I'll change with you.
5. To transfer from one conveyance to another: She changed in Chicago on her way to the coast.
6. To put on other clothing: We changed for dinner.
7. To become deeper in tone: His voice began to change at age 13.
n.
1. The act, process, or result of altering or modifying: a change in facial expression.
2. The replacing of one thing for another; substitution: a change of atmosphere; a change of ownership.
3. A transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another: the change of seasons.
4. Something different; variety: ate early for a change.
5. A different or fresh set of clothing.
6.
a. Money of smaller denomination given or received in exchange for money of higher denomination.
b. The balance of money returned when an amount given is more than what is due.
c. Coins: had change jingling in his pocket.
7. Music
a. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
b. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
8. A market or exchange where business is transacted.
Phrasal Verb:
change off
1. To alternate with another person in performing a task.
2. To perform two tasks at once by alternating or a single task by alternate means.
Idioms:
change hands
To pass from one owner to another.
change (one's) mind
To reverse a previously held opinion or an earlier decision.
change (one's) tune
To alter one's approach or attitude.

[Middle English changen, from Norman French chaunger, from Latin cambiāre, cambīre, to exchange, probably of Celtic origin.]

changing

(ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ)
adj
not remaining the same; transient
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.changing - marked by continuous change or effective action
dynamic, dynamical - characterized by action or forcefulness or force of personality; "a dynamic market"; "a dynamic speaker"; "the dynamic president of the firm"
Translations

changing

[ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ]
A. ADJcambiante
a changing worldun mundo en perpetua evolución
B. N the changing of the Guardel cambio or relevo de la Guardia
C. CPD changing room N (Brit) → vestuario m

changing

[ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] adjchangeant(e)changing room n (British)
(in shop)cabine f d'essayage
(for sports players)vestiaire m

changing

adjsich verändernd, wechselnd; the fast-changing marketder sich schnell ändernde Markt
n the changing of the Guarddie Wachablösung

changing

[ˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] adj (face, expression) → mutevole; (colours) → cangiante
References in classic literature ?
it tells us how the particle's motion is changing at each moment, not where the particle will be at some future moment.
So as time went on these well-known tales came to be told in many different ways, changing as the times changed.
Shall I ask you whether God is a magician, and of a nature to appear insidiously now in one shape, and now in another--sometimes himself changing and passing into many forms, sometimes deceiving us with the semblance of such transformations; or is he one and the same immutably fixed in his own proper image?
The massive walking-beam rose and fell above the deck; at one end a piston-rod worked up and down; and at the other was a connecting-rod which, in changing the rectilinear motion to a circular one, was directly connected with the shaft of the paddles.
A consolidated group member changing to or from a 52-53-week tax year is not eligible for automatic consent for such change, unless the requested year is identical to the consolidated group's tax year.
To mimic the characteristic of complexity theory, the written assignment was adapted to a three-phased process with a changing group format.
The key changes that will be evident on December 22nd include random pat down screenings of passengers and changing the prohibited items list to allow items that are currently banned.
20, which required that changes in accounting principle generally be recognized by including the cumulative effect of changing to a new accounting principle on the last line prior to net income (that is, a current-period approach).
They embody in practical terms the common denominators of how individuals actually go about successfully changing their behaviors.
These factors may explain some of the increase in predisposition to atopy, but any effects on asthma prevalence and morbidity could be compounded by changing pollen profiles.
Unlike other organizations that tend to focus on developing resident-centered approaches or changing the physical environment, Windsor Place puts its emphasis on caring for staff and promoting leadership training at all levels of the organization.
The prospect of changing physician compensation plans invariably leads to the classic quip about three compensation plans: last year's, this year's and next year's.