chanukiah


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chanukiah

(ˈhɑːnʊkɪə; Hebrew xanuˈkiːə)
n
(Judaism) a variant spelling of hanukiah
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In the Old City of Jerusalem, hundreds gathered to witness the lighting of a chanukiah, or menorah, using pure olive oil made to the precise specifications as the oil used to light the menorah in the ancient Jewish Temples.
This is likely the motive of the Chabad rabbis who opt for the most public display possible of the chanukiah on Chanukah, following the rabbinic dictum of pirsumeinisa--to publicize the miracle--to the entire world.
In other words, a nineteenth-century portrait of a Gentile sitter by German artist Moritz Daniel Oppenheim would be considered a "Jewish" work of art, just as much as objects with obvious Jewish content, such as a Holocaust memorial by American sculptor Louise Nevelson, a landscape scene of early twentieth-century Palestine by Israeli painter Reuven Rubin, or an eleventh-century German Chanukiah.
But what of the chanukiah, the nine-armed fire-holder that represents, in addition to Judaism's essential paradox, the assertion of a miraclean alleged interruption into our earthly landscape by the Divine?