chaotic


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cha·os

 (kā′ŏs′)
n.
1. A condition or place of great disorder or confusion.
2. A disorderly mass; a jumble: The desk was a chaos of papers and unopened letters.
3. often Chaos The disordered state of unformed matter and infinite space supposed in some cosmogonic views to have existed before the ordered universe.
4. Chaos theory.
5. Mathematics A dynamical system that has a sensitive dependence on its initial conditions.
6. Obsolete An abyss; a chasm.

[Middle English, formless primordial space, from Latin, from Greek khaos.]

cha·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.
cha·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

cha•ot•ic

(keɪˈɒt ɪk)

adj.
1. completely confused or disordered.
2. Physics, Math. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of chaos: a chaotic attractor.
[1705–15; chao (s) + -tic]
cha•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.chaotic - lacking a visible order or organization
disorganised, disorganized - lacking order or methodical arrangement or function; "a disorganized enterprise"; "a thousand pages of muddy and disorganized prose"; "she was too disorganized to be an agreeable roommate"
2.chaotic - completely unordered and unpredictable and confusing
wild - marked by extreme lack of restraint or control; "wild talk"; "wild parties"
3.chaotic - of or relating to a sensitive dependence on initial conditions
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"

chaotic

chaotic

adjective
Characterized by physical confusion:
Informal: mixed-up.
Translations
مُشَوَّشمُشَوَّش، فَوْضى، خَراب
caòtic
chaotický
kaotisk
sekasortoinen
kaotičan
zûrzavaros
óskipulegur
大混乱した
혼돈된
haotic
chaotický
kaotisk
ยุ่งเหยิง
hỗn loạn

chaotic

[keɪˈɒtɪk] ADJcaótico

chaotic

[keɪˈɒtɪk] adj [scene, situation] → chaotique; [traffic] → chaotique; [mess, pile] → en désordre

chaotic

adjchaotisch

chaotic

[keɪˈɒtɪk] adjcaotico/a, confuso/a

chaos

(ˈkeios) noun
complete disorder or confusion. The place was in utter chaos after the burglary.
chaˈotic (-tik) adjective
chaˈotically adverb

chaotic

مُشَوَّش chaotický kaotisk chaotisch χαοτικός caótico sekasortoinen chaotique kaotičan caotico 大混乱した 혼돈된 chaotisch kaotisk chaotyczny caótico хаотический kaotisk ยุ่งเหยิง karmakarışık hỗn loạn 混乱的

chaotic

n. caótico-a, desordenado-a.
References in classic literature ?
But the beginning of things, of a world especially, is necessarily vague, tangled, chaotic, and exceedingly disturbing.
The text of the poem is in a chaotic condition, and there are many interpolations, some of Byzantine date.
And yet sometimes one gets a hint of what the last scene may be like in the life of a ship and her crew, which resembles a drama in its struggle against a great force bearing it up, formless, ungraspable, chaotic and mysterious, as fate.
Yes, there is death in this business of whaling --a speechlessly quick chaotic bundling of a man into Eternity.
All the strange things he had heard from Sir Nathaniel, and all those, little and big, which he had himself noticed, crowded into his mind in a chaotic way.
He began to kick into the chaotic mass on the ground.
An observer endued with an infinite range of vision, and placed in that unknown center around which the entire world revolves, might have beheld myriads of atoms filling all space during the chaotic epoch of the universe.
Such work was far from exhilarating also, they must expect places where for miles at a time they must toil over chaotic ice-jams, where they would be fortunate if they made two miles an hour.
And Minnie wound up the conversation--if so chaotic a series of remarks deserves the name--with "Only think
Thus she proceeded mile after mile, ascending and descending till she came to Bulbarrow, and about midnight looked from that height into the abyss of chaotic shade which was all that revealed itself of the vale on whose further side she was born.
Elizabethan prose, all too chaotic in the beauty and force which overflowed into it from Elizabethan poetry, and incorrect with an incorrectness which leaves it scarcely legitimate prose at all: then, in reaction against that, the correctness of Dryden, and his followers through the eighteenth century, determining the standard of a prose in the proper sense, not inferior to the prose of the Augustan age in Latin, or of the "great age in France": and, again in reaction against this, the wild mixture of poetry and prose, in our wild nineteenth century, under the influence of such writers as Dickens and Carlyle: such are the three periods into which the story of our prose literature divides itself.
Looking back on the past six months, Margaret realized the chaotic nature of our daily life, and its difference from the orderly sequence that has been fabricated by historians.