chap


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chap 1

 (chăp)
v. chapped, chap·ping, chaps
v.tr.
To cause (the skin) to roughen, redden, or crack, especially as a result of cold or exposure: The headwind chapped the cyclist's lips.
v.intr.
To split or become rough and sore: skin that chaps easily in winter.
n.
A sore roughening or splitting of the skin, caused especially by cold or exposure.

[Middle English chappen.]

chap 2

 (chăp)
n. Chiefly British
A man or boy; a fellow.

[Short for chapman.]

chap

(tʃæp)
vb, chaps, chapping or chapped
1. (Medicine) (of the skin) to make or become raw and cracked, esp by exposure to cold
2. Scot (of a clock) to strike (the hour)
3. Scot to knock (at a door, window, etc)
n
4. (Medicine) (usually plural) a cracked or sore patch on the skin caused by chapping
5. Scot a knock
[C14: probably of Germanic origin; compare Middle Dutch, German kappen to chop off]

chap

(tʃæp) or

chappy

n, pl chaps or chappies
informal a man or boy; fellow
[C16 (in the sense: buyer): shortened from chapman]

chap

(tʃɒp; tʃæp)
n
a less common word for chop3

chap1

(tʃæp)

v. chapped, chap•ping,
n. v.t.
1. to crack, roughen, and redden (the skin).
2. to cause (the ground, wood, etc.) to split or crack.
v.i.
3. to become chapped.
n.
4. a fissure or crack, esp. in the skin.
[1275–1325; Middle English chappen; akin to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German kappen to cut]

chap2

(tʃæp)

n.
Informal. fellow; guy.
[1570–80; short for chapman]

chap3

(tʃɒp, tʃæp)

n.
[1325–75; Middle English; of uncertain orig.]

chap.

or Chap.,

1. Chaplain.
2. chapter.

chap


Past participle: chapped
Gerund: chapping

Imperative
chap
chap
Present
I chap
you chap
he/she/it chaps
we chap
you chap
they chap
Preterite
I chapped
you chapped
he/she/it chapped
we chapped
you chapped
they chapped
Present Continuous
I am chapping
you are chapping
he/she/it is chapping
we are chapping
you are chapping
they are chapping
Present Perfect
I have chapped
you have chapped
he/she/it has chapped
we have chapped
you have chapped
they have chapped
Past Continuous
I was chapping
you were chapping
he/she/it was chapping
we were chapping
you were chapping
they were chapping
Past Perfect
I had chapped
you had chapped
he/she/it had chapped
we had chapped
you had chapped
they had chapped
Future
I will chap
you will chap
he/she/it will chap
we will chap
you will chap
they will chap
Future Perfect
I will have chapped
you will have chapped
he/she/it will have chapped
we will have chapped
you will have chapped
they will have chapped
Future Continuous
I will be chapping
you will be chapping
he/she/it will be chapping
we will be chapping
you will be chapping
they will be chapping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chapping
you have been chapping
he/she/it has been chapping
we have been chapping
you have been chapping
they have been chapping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chapping
you will have been chapping
he/she/it will have been chapping
we will have been chapping
you will have been chapping
they will have been chapping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chapping
you had been chapping
he/she/it had been chapping
we had been chapping
you had been chapping
they had been chapping
Conditional
I would chap
you would chap
he/she/it would chap
we would chap
you would chap
they would chap
Past Conditional
I would have chapped
you would have chapped
he/she/it would have chapped
we would have chapped
you would have chapped
they would have chapped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chap - a boy or manchap - a boy or man; "that chap is your host"; "there's a fellow at the door"; "he's a likable cuss"; "he's a good bloke"
male person, male - a person who belongs to the sex that cannot have babies
dog - informal term for a man; "you lucky dog"
2.chap - a long narrow depression in a surfacechap - a long narrow depression in a surface
imprint, impression, depression - a concavity in a surface produced by pressing; "he left the impression of his fingers in the soft mud"
3.chap - a crack in a lip caused usually by cold
crack, scissure, cleft, crevice, fissure - a long narrow opening
4.chap - (usually in the plural) leather leggings without a seat; joined by a belt; often have flared outer flaps; worn over trousers by cowboys to protect their legs
leg covering, legging, leging - a garment covering the leg (usually extending from the knee to the ankle)
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Verb1.chap - crack due to dehydration; "My lips chap in this dry weather"
crack - break partially but keep its integrity; "The glass cracked"

chap

noun (Informal) fellow, man, person, individual, type, sort, customer (informal), character, guy (informal), bloke (Brit. informal), cove (slang), dude (U.S. & Canad. informal) Her husband's a very decent chap.

chap

noun
Informal. A grown man referred to familiarly, jokingly, or as a member of one's set or group:
Informal: boy.
Translations
رَجُلفَتى، غُلام، شابٌ صَغير
chlapíkmladíkmuž
fyr
kundi
čovjek
náungi
녀석
vaikinasvyrukas
lāga zēnspuisis
karl
ผู้ชาย
thằng cha

chap

1 [tʃæp]
A. N (on lip) → grieta f
B. VTagrietar
C. VIagrietarse

chap

2 [tʃæp] N (= man) → tío m, tipo m
a chap I knowun tío que conozco
he's a nice chapes buen chico, es buena persona
he's very deaf, poor chapes muy sordo, el pobre
how are you, old chap?¿qué tal, amigo or (S. Cone) viejo?
be a good chap and say nothingbuen chico y no digas nada
poor little chappobrecito m

chap

3 [tʃæp] N (Anat) → mandíbula f; (= cheek) → mejilla f

chap

[ˈtʃæp]
n
(British) (= man) → type m
He's a nice chap → C'est un type sympa.
(= term of address) old chap → mon vieux
vt [+ skin] → gercer, crevasser

chap

1
n (Med, of skin) he’s got chaps on his handsseine Hände sind aufgesprungen or rau
vi (skin)aufspringen
vtspröde machen; chapped lipsaufgesprungene or raue Lippen pl

chap

2
n (Brit inf: = man) → Kerl m (inf), → Typ m (inf); old chapalter Junge (inf)or Knabe (inf); poor little chaparmer Kleiner!, armes Kerlchen!; now look here (you) chapshört mal zu, Jungs (inf)

chap

3 abbr of chapterKap.

chap

1 [tʃæp] n (Brit) (fam) (man) → tipo, tizio
he's the sort of chap everyone likes → è il tipo di persona che piace a tutti
old chap → vecchio mio
poor little chap → povero piccolo

chap

2 [tʃæp]
1. n (on lip) → screpolatura
2. vt (skin) → screpolare

chap

(tʃӕp) noun
a man. He's a nice chap.

chap

رَجُل chlapík fyr Typ φιλαράκος tipo kundi gars čovjek tipo 녀석 kerel kar facet camarada парень karl ผู้ชาย ahbap thằng cha 伙伴

chap

n. hendidura, raja, grieta.

chap

vi (pret & pp chapped) agrietarse, partirse (la piel o los labios)
References in classic literature ?
If a chap gives me one black eye, that's enough for me; I sha'n't ax him for another afore I sarve him out; an' a good turn's worth as much as a bad un, anyhow.
That chap, sir,' said John, taking it out again after a time, and pointing at him with the stem, 'though he's got all his faculties about him--bottled up and corked down, if I may say so, somewheres or another--'
And it's said very well, and I like to hear a chap talk up that way; you are just the man for him --the likes of ye.
It's true, the Monsons will give me connections, and connections are almost--not quite--as good as money to get a chap along with--but, the d l of the matter is, that connections eat and drink.
He has been coming over to Europe now and then, and though he was a good, steady chap enough, he liked his fling when he was over here, and between you and me, he was the greatest crank I ever struck.
That chap was obviously listening intently to the conversation.
An' I says, `Could a delicate chap make himself stronger with 'em, Bob?
And last of all, Pip - and this I want to say very serious to you, old chap - I see so much in my poor mother, of a woman drudging and slaving and breaking her honest hart and never getting no peace in her mortal days, that I'm dead afeerd of going wrong in the way of not doing what's right by a woman, and I'd fur rather of the two go wrong the t'other way, and be a little ill-conwenienced myself.
We was six mile from the town, when we meets an old square-headed gray-haired yeoman chap, a-jogging along quite quiet.
Dead chap back there wants burying," he said, jerking a thumb over his shoulder.
I'm not a particular chap, wasn't brought up to it - no, nor squeamish either, but this is a bit thicker than anything I've ever knocked up against.
You recollect, down to the south'ard last year, a chap named Hawkins was lost in his whaleboat running the Arli Passage?