chapel


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chap·el

 (chăp′əl)
n.
1.
a. A place of worship that is smaller than and subordinate to a church.
b. A place of worship in an institution, such as a prison, college, or hospital.
c. A recess or room in a church set apart for special or small services.
d. A place of worship for those not belonging to an established church.
e. The services held at a chapel: Students attend chapel each morning.
2. Music A choir or orchestra connected with a place of worship at a royal court.
3.
a. A funeral home.
b. A room in a funeral home used for conducting funeral services.

[Middle English chapele, from Old French, from Medieval Latin capella, chapel, canopy, cape (perhaps from a shrine containing the cape of St. Martin of Tours), diminutive of capa, from Late Latin cappa, hooded cloak.]

chapel

(ˈtʃæpəl)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a place of Christian worship in a larger building, esp a place set apart, with a separate altar, in a church or cathedral
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a similar place of worship in or attached to a large house or institution, such as a college, hospital, or prison
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a church subordinate to a parish church
4. (Protestantism) (in Britain)
a. a Nonconformist place of worship
b. Nonconformist religious practices or doctrine
c. (as adjective): he is chapel, but his wife is church. Compare church8
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (in Scotland) a Roman Catholic church
6. (Journalism & Publishing) the members of a trade union in a particular newspaper office, printing house, etc
7. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a printing office
[C13: from Old French chapele, from Late Latin cappella, diminutive of cappa cloak (see cap); originally denoting the sanctuary where the cloak of St Martin of Tours was kept as a relic]

chap•el

(ˈtʃæp əl)
n.
1. a private or subordinate place of prayer or worship; oratory.
2. a separately dedicated part of a church, or a small independent churchlike edifice, devoted to special services.
3. a room or building for worship in an institution, palace, etc.
4. (in Great Britain) a place of worship for members of various dissenting Protestant churches, as Baptists or Methodists.
5. a separate place of public worship dependent on the church of a parish.
6. Chiefly Brit. the members of a trade union in a print shop.
[1175–1225; Middle English chapele < Old French < Late Latin cappella hooded cloak]

Chapel

 a choir or body of singers; an association of printers, 1688; a chapter of a printers’ union at a certain press [modern].

chapel

1. A small church which is not a parish church.
2. A Nonconformist church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chapel - a place of worship that has its own altarchapel - a place of worship that has its own altar
chantry - a chapel endowed for singing Masses for the soul of the donor
lady chapel - a small chapel in a church; dedicated to the Virgin Mary
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
side chapel - a small chapel off the side aisle of a church
2.chapel - a service conducted in a place of worship that has its own altarchapel - a service conducted in a place of worship that has its own altar; "he was late for chapel"
divine service, religious service, service - the act of public worship following prescribed rules; "the Sunday service"
Translations
كَنِيسَةٌ صَغِيرَةكَنيسَه داخِل مُؤَسَّسَهمَعْبَد، مَذْبَح
kaple
kapelkirke
kappeli
kapela
kápolna
kapellakapella; bænhús
礼拝堂
예배당
koplyčia
kapela
kaplnka
kapela
kapell
โบสถ์เล็กๆ
şapeldua odası
nhà nguyện

chapel

[ˈtʃæpəl] N
1. (= part of church) → capilla f; (= nonconformist church) → templo m
2. (as adj) it doesn't matter whether they're church or chapelno importa si son protestantes de la Iglesia Anglicana o de fuera de ella
3. [of union] → división f sindical

chapel

[ˈtʃæpəl]
n
(= church) → chapelle f
[union] → section f syndicale
modif [union] [meeting] → syndical(e)

chapel

n
Kapelle f; (Sch, Univ: = service) → Andacht f; chapel of rest Kapelle in einem Bestattungsunternehmen, wo Tote aufgebahrt werden
(= nonconformist church)Sektenkirche f
(Press, of union) Betriebsgruppe innerhalb der Gewerkschaft der Drucker und Journalisten

chapel

[ˈtʃæpl] n (of church, school) → cappella; (small church) → cappella, chiesetta

chapel

(ˈtʃӕpəl) noun
1. a place of Christian worship eg attached to an institution. a college chapel.
2. a part of a larger church, with its own altar.

chapel

كَنِيسَةٌ صَغِيرَة kaple kapel Kapelle παρεκκλήσι capilla kappeli chapelle kapela cappella 礼拝堂 예배당 kapel kapell kaplica capela часовня kapell โบสถ์เล็กๆ şapel nhà nguyện 小礼拜堂
References in classic literature ?
The chapel of the Syrians is not handsome; that of the Copts is the humblest of them all.
Rushworth, "we are coming to the chapel, which properly we ought to enter from above, and look down upon; but as we are quite among friends, I will take you in this way, if you will excuse me.
The little chapel situated opposite the marble table was selected for the scene of the grinning match.
There was such an affluence of military and other people that up to the place of the sepulture, which was a little chapel on the plain, the road from the city was filled with horsemen and pedestrians in mourning.
Then we stowed our fire- works in the chapel, locked up the place, and went home to bed.
Two yards from the door, at the head of this stair, is an opening nearly east, accessible by treading on the ledge of the wall, which diminishes eight inches each story ; and this last opening leads into a room or chapel ten feet by twelve, and fifteen or sixteen high, arched with free-stone, and supported by small circular columns of the same, the capitals and arches Saxon.
And so they whiled away the time until morning chapel.
It consisted of a high street in which were the shops, the bank, the doctor's house, and the houses of two or three coalship owners; round the little harbor were shabby streets in which lived fishermen and poor people; but since they went to chapel they were of no account.
At last, a gossip of Mrs Nubbles's, who had accompanied her to chapel on one or two occasions when a comfortable cup of tea had preceded her devotions, furnished the needful information, which Kit had no sooner obtained than he started off again.
In this same New Bedford there stands a Whaleman's Chapel, and few are the moody fishermen, shortly bound for the Indian Ocean or Pacific, who fail to make a Sunday visit to the spot.
Near the altar of the church at Bald Hills there was a chapel over the tomb of the little princess, and in this chapel was a marble monument brought from Italy, representing an angel with outspread wings ready to fly upwards.
I STOOD on the rocky eminence in front of the ruins of Saint Anthony's Chapel, and looked on the magnificent view of Edinburgh and of the old Palace of Holyrood, bathed in the light of the full moon.