charabanc


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char·a·banc

 (shăr′ə-băng′)
n. Chiefly British
A bus typically used for sightseeing, originally open and pulled by horses.

[From French char à bancs : char, coach, carriage (from Old French, cart; see chariot) + à, with (from Latin ad, toward; see ad-) + bancs, benches, pl. of banc (from Old French; see bank3).]

charabanc

(ˈʃærəˌbæŋ; French ʃarabɑ̃)
n
(Automotive Engineering) obsolete Brit a motor coach, esp one used for sightseeing tours
[C19: from French char-à-bancs, wagon with seats]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.charabanc - a vehicle carrying many passengerscharabanc - a vehicle carrying many passengers; used for public transport; "he always rode the bus to work"
minibus - a light bus (4 to 10 passengers)
public transport - conveyance for passengers or mail or freight
roof - protective covering on top of a motor vehicle
school bus - a bus used to transport children to or from school
trackless trolley, trolley coach, trolleybus - a passenger bus with an electric motor that draws power from overhead wires
window - a transparent opening in a vehicle that allow vision out of the sides or back; usually is capable of being opened
fleet - group of motor vehicles operating together under the same ownership
passenger, rider - a traveler riding in a vehicle (a boat or bus or car or plane or train etc) who is not operating it
Translations

charabanc

(o.f.) [ˈʃærəbæŋ] N (Brit) → autobús m, autocar m (Sp)

charabanc

[ʃarabɑ̃] n (British)char m à bancs
References in periodicals archive ?
Who today can identify a charabanc, a dos-a-dos or even a phaeton?
Brenda Winter, along with Jones one of the founders of the Charabanc theatre company, rather pleasingly notes that at a production of their first play Lay Up Your Ends, one newspaper reviewer really did not know what to say or how to categorize the play to begin his analysis: "He was unable to fit the play into any recognisable matrix of Irish literary drama.
Now Raphael Morris has come up with this evocative picture of Poets Corner Inn, showing what looks to be a charabanc trip, waiting to leave the hostelry.
And it was also respected old women who would arrange the charabanc trips to the country or the seaside and the street parties that celebrated the great events in the life of the nation, like VE Day and the coronation of the Queen.
Those judged to be the tastiest will win two places on The Elephant's Grand Charabanc to Portmeirion, in North Wales, along with other prizes for the runners-up.
Visitors will be able to take a trip on a charabanc or a late 1800s London omnibus, and watch pit ponies at work.
In Victorian times Cardiffians could take a tram to Pierhead, sail over to Weston and take a charabanc to Cheddar Gorge.
Booked to appear, like ghosts from the past, area vintage 1890s carousel, a steam roller, veteran canal boats, several horses, a model rural workshop entirely powered by steam, a charabanc and costumed re-enactors.
It could be that all these people were employed by the business they are standing in front of possibly while they waited for the charabanc.
A charabanc took us from Cardiff on a scenic tour of Port Talbot and the valleys before setting us down in a lovely wee country pub for a full Welsh breakfast washed down by several bottles of Magners.
London, August 22 (ANI): A new research from Collins Dictionary has indicated that words like aerodrome, charabanc, wittol, drysalter, alienism and many others are no longer used by people.