charabanc


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charabanc

char·a·banc

 (shăr′ə-băng′)
n. Chiefly British
A bus typically used for sightseeing, originally open and pulled by horses.

[From French char à bancs : char, coach, carriage (from Old French, cart; see chariot) + à, with (from Latin ad, toward; see ad-) + bancs, benches, pl. of banc (from Old French; see bank3).]

charabanc

(ˈʃærəˌbæŋ; French ʃarabɑ̃)
n
(Automotive Engineering) obsolete Brit a motor coach, esp one used for sightseeing tours
[C19: from French char-à-bancs, wagon with seats]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.charabanc - a vehicle carrying many passengerscharabanc - a vehicle carrying many passengers; used for public transport; "he always rode the bus to work"
minibus - a light bus (4 to 10 passengers)
public transport - conveyance for passengers or mail or freight
roof - protective covering on top of a motor vehicle
school bus - a bus used to transport children to or from school
trackless trolley, trolley coach, trolleybus - a passenger bus with an electric motor that draws power from overhead wires
window - a transparent opening in a vehicle that allow vision out of the sides or back; usually is capable of being opened
fleet - group of motor vehicles operating together under the same ownership
passenger, rider - a traveler riding in a vehicle (a boat or bus or car or plane or train etc) who is not operating it
Translations

charabanc

(o.f.) [ˈʃærəbæŋ] N (Brit) → autobús m, autocar m (Sp)

charabanc

[ʃarabɑ̃] n (British)char m à bancs
References in periodicals archive ?
Cars on show on the day include a 1928 Austin 7 Gordon England, 1925 Morris Charabanc, 1938 Lagonda, 1930 Invicta 4.
Bruised and humiliated, the Old Etonian, not the state-educated boy, is struggling to keep the charabanc on the road.
On day one of the 1976 season, I was waiting for a charabanc to The Hawthorns, having just happily bitten the head off a pink sugar mouse.
And the coach and bus operator's recent acceleration has been more jump- jet than charabanc.
The first coach came in 1924 - a vehicle that worked as a lorry all week before becoming a charabanc at the weekends for pleasure trips.
It's from the 1920s that company archivist John Kelly has dug up the first photographs of Taveners' workforce, preparing to set out on a charabanc trip to Blackpool.
Not only that but I remember oh so clearly the trip to the Birmingham Town Hall in a charabanc provided by the church to see a Christmas show being staged for all us poor kids.
My chum Rupes - the only chap in the world smugger than me - says we will soon send that East End wheeler-dealer Redknapp on the charabanc back to Cockneyland and leave me in charge, where I belong.
Everybody and anybody with a clapped out charabanc hiding under a dust sheet in the garage was allowed to call themselves bus operators.
They went on a coach trip, which used to be called a charabanc, when Mam was about 17.
a womens' society outing in the first charabanc in 1924, famous Smiths Imperial coaches in their heyday in the 50s, and the founder William Smith Snr with his son, who took over the firm in 1970A TERROR raid has forced the boss of one of the best-known Midlands coach firms to call it a day.
Which is why spending an extra pounds 330,000 on a day-long grand finale to Liverpool's six-month World Expo charabanc to Shanghai cannot be justified, morally, politically or economically.