characterized


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char·ac·ter·ize

 (kăr′ək-tə-rīz′)
tr.v. character·ized, character·iz·ing, character·iz·es
1. To describe the qualities or peculiarities of: characterized the warden as ruthless.
2. To be a distinctive trait or mark of; distinguish: the rash and high fever that characterize this disease; a region that is characterized by its dikes and canals.

char′ac·ter·iz′er n.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
For this purpose, they divided the term of his life between them, and each endowed one portion of it with the qualities which chiefly characterized himself.
The same Celtic desultoriness characterized all the rest of his life, though it could not thwart his genius.
All Goldsmith's literary work is characterized by one main quality, a charming atmosphere of optimistic happiness which is the expression of the best side of his own nature.
South America is characterized by possessing many peculiar gnawers, a family of monkeys, the llama, peccari, tapir, opossums, and, especially, several genera of Edentata, the order which includes the sloths, ant-eaters, and armadilloes.
When I stand among these mighty Leviathan skeletons, skulls, tusks, jaws, ribs, and vertebrae, all characterized by partial resemblances to the existing breeds of sea-monsters; but at the same time bearing on the other hand similar affinities to the annihilated antichronical Leviathans, their incalculable seniors; I am, by a flood, borne back to that wondrous period, ere time itself can be said to have begun; for time began with man.
Then with the unerring official memory that characterized him he repeated from the opening words of the manifesto:
But we perhaps exaggerate the gray or sable tinge, which undoubtedly characterized the mood and manners of the age.
Were there not even these inducements to moderation, nothing could be more ill-judged than that intolerant spirit which has, at all times, characterized political parties.
Never once had he been out of the crate during the entire journey, and filthiness, as well as wretchedness, characterized his condition.
The fever pursued the ordinary course, and was characterized by the usual intervals of delirium and exhaustion succeeding each other.
Colonel Pyncheon, the claimant, as we gather from whatever traits of him are preserved, was characterized by an iron energy of purpose.
He was one of the martyrs to that terrible delusion, which should teach us, among its other morals, that the influential classes, and those who take upon themselves to be leaders of the people, are fully liable to all the passionate error that has ever characterized the maddest mob.