charitableness


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char·i·ta·ble

 (chăr′ĭ-tə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Generous in giving money or other help to the needy: "found her way to a charitable family, the kind who take in babies left on their front porch" (Rachel Simon).
b. Of, for, or concerned with charity: a charitable donation. See Synonyms at benevolent.
2.
a. Lenient or forbearing in judging others.
b. Characterized by lenient or forbearing judgment: a charitable interpretation of the politician's remarks.

char′i·ta·ble·ness n.
char′i·ta·bly adv.

Charitableness

 

cast one’s bread upon the waters To act charitably or generously without thought of return or personal profit. The reference is to Ecclesiastes 11:1:

Cast thy bread upon the waters; for thou shalt find it after many days.

sprout wings To do an act of charity; to perform a good deed. This expression is based on the conventional depiction of angels as winged beings. It is usually used jocularly to suggest that one is progressing toward a more angelic nature. The expression is occasionally extended to mean death, perhaps as an assumption that those bound for eternal bliss develop the wings of angels.

widow’s mite A small amount of money, especially a small contribution that represents a great sacrifice from one with limited financial resources. This expression is Biblical in origin, mite referring to a coin of very little value, less than an eighth of a penny.

And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing. … [And Christ said] this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury: for all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living. (Mark 12:42-44)

A commonly used variation is mite.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.charitableness - generosity as manifested by practicing charity (as for the poor or unfortunate)
generosity, generousness - the trait of being willing to give your money or time

charitableness

noun
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The female Bullock, aunt of Georgy, although despoiled by that little monster of one-half of the sum which she expected from her father, nevertheless showed her charitableness of spirit by being reconciled to the mother and the boy.
The study, carried out by One4all Gift Cards UK, found that almost 80% of those from the region consider charitableness and generosity as important qualities in lovers, which is 4% than the national average.
The study, carried out by One4all Gift Cards UK, found that almost 80% of those from the North East consider charitableness and generosity as important qualities in lovers, which is 4% more than the national average.
Will it foster a sense of civic vibrancy and charitableness that Tocqueville found in emerging America?
More than that, they embodied an integrity, a charitableness and an independent spirit that long will be admired and remembered.
If this new report on the Catholic Campaign for Human Development shows anything, it is that an integral part of Catholic identity is concern for the poor--not just for individual charitableness, but for an integral approach to achieving justice for all.
it might enable our enemies to question the charitableness of our motives' (quoted in Cockett, 1995, 131).